August 13, 2013 15:50

Socko wins Riga Technical University Open on tiebreak

Socko wins Riga Technical University Open on tiebreak

The strong Riga Technical University Open was won by Polish grandmaster Bartosz Socko, who scored 7/9 and edged out Dutch GM Robin van Kampen on tiebreak. 183 players from 28 federations competed in the main event, making it the biggest chess festival in the Baltic States and one of the biggest in Northern Europe.

The strong Open tournament “Riga Technical University Open” has ended in Riga, Latvia on Sunday. 183 players from 28 federations competed in the main event, making it the biggest chess festival in the Baltic States and one of the biggest in Northern Europe. There where 27 grandmasters among the participants, including six rated over 2600 – Igor Kovalenko (Latvia, 2646), Bartosz Socko (Poland, 2646), Aleksej Alksandrov (Belarus, 2626), Jaan Ehlvest (USA, 2606), Yuri Vovk (Ukraine, 2608) and Robin van Kampen (Netherlands, 2606).

By Matiss Silis

Grandmaster Bartosz Socko won the event with 7 points out of 9 games, edging out grandmaster Robin van Kampen on tiebreaks.

After the first four rounds two unexpected leaders emerged – Lithuanian GM Aloyzas Kveinys (2491, ranked 25th in the starting list) and the young Russian IM Mikhail Antipov (2488, ranked 27th in the starting list). Kveinys beat IM Bjorn Thorfinnsson in a nice 3rd round game.

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Aloyzas Kveinys

Both leaders played great games in round four – Kveinys crushed IM Vilka Sipila with black, while Antipov won against IM Daniel Naroditsky.

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Only after the 6th round did GM Robin van Kampen manage to catch up with the leaders by beating IM Cyril Ponizil in an impressive game.

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Robin van Kampen

After the seventh round Czech GM Igor Rausis and American IM Daniel Naroditsky joined the leaders.  Before the final round leaders group had grown to six people, with the rating favorites Igor Kovalenko (who won an instructive game against GM Evgeniy Solozhenkin) and Bartosz Socko (who made chess seem a simple game in his win over IM Bjorn Ahlander) among others catching up.

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In the last round Bartosz Socko beat Kveinys by capitalizing on the latter's tactical mistake.

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Bartosz Socko

Robin van Kampen outplayed Sakalauskas on the black side of King's Indian and joined Socko in the lead.

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As the other leaders drew their games, the eventual winner was decided on tiebreak between Socko and van Kampen. 

Several GM norms where achieved in the event. Mikhail Antipov scored his second GM norm, while Daniel Naroditsky, Helgi Dam Ziska and Mindaugas Beinoras scored their first. [In fact Naroditsky had scored three GM norms already, and we also wonder if it was Helgi Dam Ziska's first - CV]

A lot of IM norms where achieved as well – the young Norwegian Tari Aryan scored a norm as did Russians Maxim Lugoskoy and David Paravyan, as well as Alan B Merry from England, Ido Be Azri from Israel, Ilja Sirosh from Estonia and Tomas Tvarijonas from Lithuania. Also two local players – Matiss Mustaps and Kristaps Kretainis – scored their third and second IM norms respectively.

Riga Technical University Open 2013 | Final standings (top 30)

Rk. Naam FED Rtg Pts. TB1 TB2 TB3 Rp rtg+/-
1 Socko Bartosz POL 2646 7 40 50 2608 2608 -1,3
2 Van Kampen Robin NED 2606 7 39,5 50,5 2644 2644 4,2
3 Antipov Mikhail Al. RUS 2488 6,5 40,5 51 2640 2640 18,9
4 Burmakin Vladimir RUS 2565 6,5 40 51 2565 2565 0,7
5 Kovalenko Igor LAT 2646 6,5 39 50 2620 2620 -1,7
6 Naroditsky Daniel USA 2503 6,5 38,5 49,5 2601 2601 12,5
7 Collins Sam E. IRL 2463 6,5 38 48,5 2553 2553 12,3
8 Lugovskoy Maxim RUS 2372 6,5 37 47 2563 2563 24
9 Rausis Igors CZE 2552 6,5 37 46,5 2525 2525 -0,7
10 Vovk Yuri UKR 2608 6,5 36,5 46 2553 2553 -4,1
11 Kulaots Kaido EST 2581 6,5 36 46,5 2519 2519 -3,4
12 Hera Imre Jr. HUN 2567 6,5 35 45 2515 2515 -4,2
13 Dragun Kamil POL 2546 6,5 33,5 43 2495 2495 -4,4
14 Kveinys Aloyzas LTU 2491 6 41 52,5 2604 2604 14,3
15 Vovk Andrey UKR 2581 6 39 49,5 2513 2513 -6,8
16 Gleizerov Evgeny RUS 2567 6 38,5 49,5 2483 2483 -6,9
17 Baghdasaryan Vahe ARM 2414 6 37,5 48 2477 2477 8,7
18 Carlstedt Jonathan GER 2387 6 37 47 2545 2545 19,3
19 Boruchovsky Avital ISR 2441 6 37 45,5 2490 2490 7,7
20 Neiksans Arturs LAT 2557 6 36,5 46,5 2503 2503 -5,6
21 Vysochin Spartak UKR 2531 6 36,5 46,5 2491 2491 -4,1
22 Yemelin Vasily RUS 2564 6 36,5 45,5 2516 2516 -4,8
23 Paravyan David RUS 2426 6 36 46,5 2568 2568 17,6
24 Berzinsh Roland LAT 2400 6 34,5 45 2476 2476 10,8
25 Ben Artzi Ido ISR 2341 6 33,5 41,5 2501 2501 29,3
26 Mustaps Matiss LAT 2261 6 32 41,5 2411 2411 30,8
27 Sakalauskas Vaidas LTU 2399 6 30 39,5 2423 2423 4,8
28 Beinoras Mindaugas LTU 2378 5,5 41 51,5 2597 2597 26,4
29 Dastan Muhammed Batuhan TUR 2417 5,5 41 51 2522 2522 13,5
30 Ziska Helgi Dam FAI 2468 5,5 40,5 50,5 2600 2600 16,8

Full final standings here | Thanks to Matiss Silis of the Latvian Chess Federation, who provided the report & photos.

Editors's picture
Author: Editors
Chess.com

Comments

Matiss Silis's picture

"Several GM norms where achieved in the event. Mikhail Antipov scored his second GM norm, while Daniel Naroditsky, Helgi Dam Ziska and Mindaugas Beinoras scored their first. [In fact Naroditsky had scored three GM norms already, and we also wonder if it was Helgi Dam Ziska's first - CV]"

According to the FIDE site it's first for Naroditsky, but FIDE is not the most reliable of sources. I asked Ziska about his norms personally and he confirmed that this is his first.

Sarunas's picture

A well laid-out organization makes RTU Open stand out way above other Baltic tourneys. As it runs in the very heart of Riga, it leans back comfortably onto amazing city's heritage, reflected in ancient cathedrals, piercing the sky. Daugava river is just a stone throw away, so rounding off a double round day on a ship with a pint of Latvian beer or a drop of Rigas Balzams is an advice to consider. Riga is also a harbour city therefore it takes only half an hour ride by electric train to reach Jurmala beach with its white sand shore. The train will take you across Daugava and then you can get off at Majori where Latvians held last 2 V.Petrov Memorials. At Uzbek restaurant they serve most genuine, highly savorious pilaf.

anti f's's picture

Id say kveinys knows some iffy characters. Don't be surprised if Bosko turns up in a dumpster next week after beating him!

Flovin's picture

It was not only Helgi Dam Ziska's first GM-norm. It was also the first GM-norm ever scored by a chess player from the Faroe Islands! :-)

Anonymous's picture

http://www.uschess.org/content/view/12280/719/

If you take two seconds and Google 'naroditsky' this is one of the first things that pops up.

Who gets paid to do this report without research

Johan's picture

Robin Van Kampen stays one of the cutest chessplayer. If we don't speak about MC body ;)
His chess improvements are also impressive

Sarunas's picture

True, Rigas Opens has established itself as a highest profile Baltic tournament. I think its success story leans back comfortably on remarkable Riga‘s heritage, reflected well in Old Town cathedrals, piercing the skies. Daugava river is just a stone cast away from playing venue, so after a double round day you may board a ship with friends where a pint of Latvian beer or a shot of Rigas Balzams are options worth consideration.
As in August it may get hot even in Riga, the visitor may hop on a train in Railroad Station which having crossed Daugava bridge will bring him in just half an hour to Jurmala, which is a well acclaimed white sanded resort on a Baltic shore. You may get off at Majori where recent 2 editions of Petrov Memorial have been contested at City‘s Museum. After refreshing sea swim I can reccomend you an Uzbek restaurant on Jomas street where they serve most genuine pilaf. Also all sorts of summer fruits are great there out on Jomas street –you can wash them in a fountain nearby.

Tarjei's picture

"the young Norwegian Tari Aryan scored a norm"

Yes, but Aryan Tari didn't need it as it was his 5th. The 14 year old is already getting his IM title in the end of September.

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