May 14, 2013 16:34

FIDE dress code: no more beach slips, torn pants or sport caps

FIDE dress code: no more beach-wear slips, torn pants or sport caps

Earlier today FIDE published a proposal of one of its Vice Presidents, Ms. Beatriz Marinello, regarding a dress code for FIDE events. At the recent Presidential Board meeting in Baku, it was decided that this proposal would be published online so that federations could comment on it. We decided to publish it here as well, because FIDE might also be interested in the opinion of the average chess fan. (And if not, we certainly are.)

FIDE DRESS CODE POLICY: HELP CHESS BY WEARING PROPER ATTIRE

Objective:

It is important to promote a good and positive image of chess. Attire worn during all phases of the championships and events should be in good taste and appropriate to such a prestigious chess event.

Regulations

1 Events regulated by the Dress Code

1a World Events for Adult Players (over 21 years old)
      World Championship Match
      Candidates Tournament
      Women's World Championship Match
      Chess Olympiad
      World Team Championship
      Women's World Team Championship
      World Cup
      FIDE Grand Prix Series
      Women's FIDE Grand Prix Series
      World Amateur Championships
      World Rapid and Blitz Championships
      Women's World Rapid and Blitz Championships

1b World Events for Junior and Youth Players (under 21 years old)
      World Junior U20 Chess Championships
      World Youth Championships
      World Youth U-16 Chess Olympiad
      World School Individual Championship

1c Presidential Board Meetings and FIDE Congresses

1d Other Official Events. (Regulations only affects FIDE representatives)
      SportAccord Convention
      IPCA World Individual Chess Championship
      FISU University Olympiad
      World Congress of Chess Composition
      World Chess Solving Championship
      World Chess Championship for Disabled
      South East Asia (SEA) Games
      SportAccord Mind Games

1e Continental events are regulated by each continent

1f In regard of this Dress Code, other tournaments sanctioned by the FIDE rules and ratings are under the regulations of Nationals Federations.

1g Exception can be made on the basis of health and religion.

2 Who are affected by the Code of Dress?

2a Players participating in the events, captains, Head of Delegations.

2b Tournament Organizer and Staff. This includes arbiters, and other people working at the event.

3 Dress Code for players during games in progress.

3a The following is acceptable for men players, captains, head of delegation.

Suits, ties, dressy pants, trousers, jeans, long-sleeve or shirt-sleeve dress shirt, dress shirt, alternatively T-shirts or polo, dress shoes, loafers or dressy slip-ons, socks, shoes or sneakers, sport coat, blazer, Bermuda shorts, turtleneck, jacket, vest or sweater. Team uniforms and national costumes clothing.

3b The following is NOT acceptable for men players, captains, head of delegation.

Beach-wear slips, profanity and nude or semi-nude pictures printed on shirts, torn pants or jeans. holes, denim shorts, short-shorts, cut-off shorts, gym shorts, unclean clothing, sun glasses, sport caps.

3c The following is acceptable for women players

Women's suits, dresses. skirts, blouses, turtleneck, T-shirts or poloʼs, trousers, jeans or slacks, footwear (boots, flats, mid-heel or high- heel shoes, sneakers with sock), jacket, vest or sweater, a scarf, as well as jewelry (earrings, necklace, etc.) coordinated to the outfit may be worn. Team uniforms, national costumes clothing.

3d The following is NOT acceptable for women players

Beach-wear slips, profanity and nude or semi-nude pictures printed on shirts, torn pants or jeans. holes, noticeable unclean clothing, sun glasses, sport caps. Revealing attire. Clothes such as denim shorts, short-shorts, cut-off shorts, gym shorts, crop tops, tank tops, and clothes made of see-through materials or clothes that expose areas of the body usually covered in the location where the event is taking place.

FIDE officials and representatives attending the event.

4 Dress Code for winning teams and players (Includes players, captains, head of delegations) for awards ceremonies.

Business casual (European standards), which means long trousers or pants, shirt, jacket, with or without tie (no t-shirts, no polo, no jeans, no sports shoes or sneakers or slippers, no hats or caps (except for religious reasons) and the equivalent style of dress for women players.

National costumes and team uniforms are allowed.

5 Dress Code for arbiters, organizers, FIDE official and representatives at FIDE events including Presidential Board meetings, Executive Meetings and Congresses.

Business casual (European standards), which means long trousers or pants, shirt, jacket, with or without tie (no t-shirts, no polo, no jeans, no sports shoes or sneakers or slippers, no hats or caps (except for religious reasons) and the equivalent style of dress for women.

6 Handling Dress Code Violations

The dress code will be enforced at all FIDE events. people in the position to enforce the dress code:

Chief Arbiter or Tournament Director
Event Organizer
Organizing Committee
Members of the Presidential Board attending the event.

A player not in proper dress code will not be allowed to play, until she or he comply with the FIDE Dress Code. Tournament staff and FIDE officials/ representatives not in proper dress code will be asked to remove him or herself from the event or meeting until complying with the FIDE Dress Code.

There is no !dress code !at any function that is away from the playing hall, provided that the host facility for that function does not have a dress code.

This dress code topic has a bit of history. The European Chess Union introduced a dress country one and a half years ago, which we posted here. It led to a big debate and the news even reached some mainstream media.

In general we get the impression that now, a year after the ECU introduced their dress code in their first tournament, it's less of a controversial topic. Players seem to be trying to follow them more or less, while organizers don't seem to be applying them too strictly.

That might be different for FIDE events. With topics like this one, the problem is always that it's hard to enforce the same rules both at events where professionals play, and at tournaments with mostly amateurs. For example, at the World Championship match or at Grand Prix tournaments everyone seems to agree that players should be wearing at least a shirt and jacket, and if they want, a tie.

However, players like Vassily Ivanchuk and Hikaru Nakamura occasionally wear a sport cap as well, which would be impossible if the above proposal gets accepted. And would it really be necessary to ban beach-wear slips, torn pants and sport caps from all other events listed above,  e.g. the World U16 or the World Chess Solving Championship?

Hikaru Nakamura at the start of round 6 of the Norway Chess tournament | Photo courtesy of Norway Chess

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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers
Chess.com

Comments

Donald Trump's picture

Beatriz is just jealous that no one wants to see her in skimpy outfits. If chess wants to gain some mainstream attention, it has to rely on attractive female masters showing off their goods. As for Nakamura, yes, make him take off the sports cap, force him to wear a horse head while playing.

Septimus's picture

Good stuff! Somebody hand this man a beer!

grasjeroen's picture

I really like the difference between the rules for men and women. Man are not allowed to wear unclean clothes, but women are not allowed to wear noticable unclean clothes. Lucky women! :-) On the other hand, man are allowed to wear see through clothing.
I wish this was all a joke, as it would be hilarious.

Anonymous's picture

Had the chess players sporting baseball caps at FIDE events done it with more style the head gear might not have been banned.

Unfortunately, most all eastern european chess players wearing them looked like dorks and Naka wears his hat like a white-boy.

Kamsky's the only one I can think of who came close to looking "cool" in a cap. Btw, congrat's to Gata for winning the USA championship.

Anonymous's picture

What is wrong with sun glasses? What if your eyes are over sensitive? What if you want to avoid the stare?

Stephen's picture

Next step - The official FIDE catalogue of approved clothes modelled by ... Kirsan and Beatriz.

Stephen's picture

Business casual (European standards) might mean something different if you are from certain parts of Amsterdam - so I'm told, of course.

Tony's picture

While a good idea to present a more professional look things have to be carefully thought out.
A lot of the problems occur when people who have zero or limited knowledge of a subject such as fashion try to make rules.
A few areas of conflict are cultural acceptability for example:
In Hawaii it is perfectly acceptable to wear 'Hawaiian shirts" to a professional work environment and it is considered and accepted as dress attire. There are others but this is a good example of how a black and white approach to something can backfire.

Ball caps are also used for advertising (I have seen many players use hats during and after games) . Untucked shirts are also a fashion item. Dress shirts should be tucked it but there are dress shirts with a sport cut that can be left untucked,
Tennis shoes run the gamut of overly casual to "dress", Torn jeans is also vague since many high end fashion jeans have small tears or "wear" on them.
In addition some of the items in the womens list can be be added to the mens. See through clothing or over exposure of skin should be included for men too (think beer belly or sheer skin tight shirts)

They should put the power into the tournament directors hands in any case of conflict or cultural clash.

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