Reports | March 30, 2009 20:52

Anand helps Baden-Baden to clinch 4th title in a row

Baden-BadenSaturday OSC Baden-Baden clinched their 4th German title in a row by beating Aljechin Solingen 6-2. With a 4-point margin the club was sure of retaining its title and another 6-2 victory on Sunday against SV Wattenscheid was only for the statistics, but a nice celebration. World Champion Viswanathan Anand played his only two games of the season for Baden-Baden this last weekend, and won them both.

Peter Heine Nielsen, Viswanathan Anand, Peter Svidler, Michael Adams and Pentala Harikrishna | Photo: Christian Bossert

This weekend the last two rounds of the Schachbundesliga took place. The Ooser Schachgesellschaft Baden-Baden, playing on home ground, needed only two points to win their 4th German club title in a row, but dully won both of their matches against Solingen and Wattenscheid 6-2.

Right after the Amber tournament World Champion Anand had flown from Nice to Germany and in Saturday's match he beat Dutchman Daniel Stellwagen with Black in the Poisened Pawn Variation of the Sicilian Najdorf. Stellwagen had visited the Amber tournament during the first weekend to kibitz on the many games, including Anand's (who never played this line in Nice though).

To continue the Amber memories (sorry, can't help it, it's unexpectedly sunny back in Amsterdam!), another kibitzer there, John Nunn, wrote a whole book on the 6.Bg5 Najdorf (The Complete Najdorf: 6.Bg5, Batsford, 1996) and the only thing the World Champion was doing in the opening phase was follow the Doctor's recommended line; a German correspondence game from '87 (which, by the way, can be improved for White somewhere). The following notes are based on grabbing that book (still a gem after all those years) and some good spacebar hitting, keeping an eye on Dennis Monokroussos doing a similar job.

Werder Bremen and TV Tegernsee finished third and second, and they were they other two clubs that qualified for the next European Club Cup. SG Trier, FC Bayern M?ºnchen and USV TU Dresden have relegated together with Tegernsee who have announced withdrawal of their team for next season.

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Baden-Baden games rounds 14 and 15
Baden-Baden vs Solingen Baden-Baden vs Wattenscheid

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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

Castro's picture

@Vlad
:-) Yes, opposite they were: one black, the other white.
No, I'm joking, I understand your point. But the colours may tell a bit, too.

From the Reykjavik tournament: Big chance lost by Stefansson, as black, against Areshenko! I was seeing it live. After 37. ...Qb7, Stefanson is completely winning. Areshenko tries to confuse matters 38.Rc6!? Rxb2 39.Qd1!?, speculating on Nxg6 and Qg4 maybe attaining a perpetual, but it was false!
Now Stefansson sees (and plays) the expected 39....Qb4?? After 40.Nxg6, the draw is a fact (and is black who have to be carefull not to loose!
But there is no draw in the variation I was thinking about, and black realy wins nicely!:
39....a3!! Now 40.Rxd6? a2! and, for instance 41.Rdc6 Qxc6!! 0-1
If, instead, 40.Nxg6 a2! 41.Qg4 (here this is much weaker, because the black queen didn't leave, and still controls the 2nd rank) Rb142.Nxe5+ Kh8 43.Qxd4 a1=Q 44.Nxf7+ Kh7 wins.

Arne Moll's picture

I think 18.Nxg5 might well be 'human' preparation. It's very hard for Black to solve his problems from a practical point of view. Against any other player it could have worked out great. Just look at the position after 27 moves without a computer: is it really possible that black survives this position? But Anand's defensive skills are simply amazing.

Hugo van Hengel's picture

Is this Daniel's first game against the current World Champion? It is quite an impressive one! I guess many players would have lost straight forward in their first game against the World Champion.

CAL|Daniel's picture

at move 27 it not only looks like black will survive but is already better. His pieces are finally coordinating a little. A better point to look at is move 21. Remember black has material superiority so if his pieces ever do coordinate completely there would be no doubt that black would win.

Arne Moll's picture

Well, Cal|Daniel, perhaps if you count only material the position looks OK for black, but this won't get you very far in many positions where the king is under fire from Queen, Rook on 7th rank and Knight. For instance, after 28.Nf7+ Black must counter-intuitively walk straight into a whole bunch of discovered checks... it takes some very courageous calculating to 'feel' that Black's going to be OK...

Janis Nisii's picture

I think the picture is very beautiful! Thumbs up for Christian Bossert!
Is it possible to see a bigger version of this photo somewhere?

Peter Doggers's picture

Yes, just click on his name.

VB's picture

Peter my point is how it happened that the main line is not "decent "? 13.Bh4 Qa2 14.Rd1 Qd5 15.Qe3 Qxe5 16.Be2 Bc5 17. Bg3 Bd4 18. Rd4 Qa5 19. Rd2 0-0 20. Bd6. Someone to prove advantage for black here?

Vlad's picture

You may see here two opposite approaches to face Anand . One of Stellwagen, another one of Macieja.

Thomas's picture

I am also not sure when the position was, at first sight, "unclearer" (itself an odd word and sort of a joke), after move 21 or move 27. True, black managed to improve his piece coordination in the meantime - but in return white obtained a potentially dangerous passed h-pawn and started advancing it. Not even mentioned by Arne Moll, but his other points (28. Nf7+ looks quite dangerous) also make perfect sense to me.

VB's picture

13. Bb5 "This astonishing move is the only decent continuation for White" - Nunn.

Nunn simply wrong!!

vaughn's picture

In Reykjavik Open the game Gm Maze Sebastian Vs Gm Nataf Igor-Alexandre ended in a draw after 2 moves(if it's not a transmision error or something extraordinary happened)!

Thomas's picture

Well it was a Petroff - maybe that's enough to not even try (between two countrymen)

Peter Doggers's picture

@VB "Nunn simply wrong!!" Ehm... what point are you trying to make exactly, that the theoretical evaluation of that specific move or position has changed over the years? Wel... doh.

vaughn's picture

@Thomas:they may argue that Rybka thinks it's equal...:))

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