David Smerdon | September 20, 2011 0:00

Svidler clean-bowls Grischuk, wins Siberian Ashes

Hearty congratulations to Russian grandmaster Peter Svidler, who today won the final of the World Chess Cup against compatriot and friend Alexander Grischuk.

After a tenacious month of cut throat knockout chess in the tiny Siberian town of Khanty Mansiysk, Svidler emerged as clearly the best player of the 128-strong event.  And it couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy.

Proof that you don’t need to worry too much about opening theory to succeed in chess.  Proof that you can, in fact, win with the black pieces at top level.  Proof that nice guys don’t always finish last.

But, most importantly, proof that you can love cricket more than chess and still get away with the odd million or two in chess prize money.  There’s hope for us Aussies yet.

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David Smerdon's picture
Author: David Smerdon

David Smerdon is a chess grandmaster from Brisbane, Australia. David attended Anglican Church Grammar School and Melbourne University. To qualify for the title of Grandmaster, a player must achieve three Grandmaster norm performances, and a FIDE Elo rating over 2500. Late in 2007, Smerdon achieved his third and final Grandmaster norm. In the July 2009 FIDE rating list his rating passed 2500, so he qualified for the title of Grandmaster. He is the fourth Australian to become a Grandmaster, after Ian Rogers, Darryl Johansen and Zhao Zong-Yuan. In 2009, Smerdon won the Queenstown Chess Classic tournament.

Source: Wikipedia

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Comments

Chess FAn's picture

Ha Ha! Very clever headline, obviously alluding to Peter Svidler's love for cricket.
Must have been written by a Britisher as I do not know whether any Dutchman knows the history and significance of the Ashes.
Congratulations on one of the most brilliant headlines that I have seen in recent times or ever!

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