Reports | October 13, 2011 18:23

Bacrot & Karjakin share first in Poikovsky

Bacrot & Karjakin share first in Poikovsky

Etienne Bacrot and Sergei Karjakin finished shared first at the Karpov tournament in Poikovsky, Russia. Both players scored 5.5/9 (UPDATE: it was Etienne Bacrot who was declared the winner on tie-break) and only one player finished on '+1': Fabiano Caruana. Until the very end the tournament stayed peaceful with only 11/45 decisive games.

Event 12th Karpov tournament  | PGN via TWIC
Dates October 4th-13th, 2011
Location Poikovsky, Russia
System 10-player round robin
Players Karjakin, Jakovenko, Caruana, Bacrot, Laznicka, Efimenko, Motylev, Bruzon, Rublevsky and Onischuk

Poikovsky

In our first report on the tournament in Poikovsky we already mentioned the high number of draws (sixteen of the first twenty games), and unfortunately this didn't really change in the remainder of the tournament. In the end the drawing percentage was 76%, which is very high for a tournament like this. However, perhaps it's not that surprising for a private tournament where many of the players are friends with the organizer and each other, and have played the tournament more than once.

The tournament named after 12th World Champion Anatoly Karpov saw two players finish shared first: Sergei Karjakin (Russia) and Etienne Bacrot (France), who caught Karjakin in the very last round. The Frenchman scored the only decisive game in the fifth round against Fabiano Caruana (Italy):

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The best game of the tournament was no doubt the following, from the seventh round - brilliant stuff from Motylev:

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Sergei Karjakin tricked his former compatriot Zahar Efimenko already right after the opening:

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Karpov Tournament (Poikovsky) 2011 | Round 9 (Final) Standings


 

 

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

S3's picture

Karjakin (co) wins yet another tournament very efficiently. But Bacrot might even have finished on +3 if he had converted his edge against Rublevsky.

Oh yes, before people bring up the usual complaints..most of the draws, especially in the 2nd half of the tournament, were hard fought.

redivivo's picture

Not a bad result for Karjakin but he was the only participant in the top 25 and was expected to win, so Bacrot did well to take it on tiebreak. Most of Karjakin's games were short draws but he did win two games and play two games that went past move 30. On the whole maybe slightly disappointing after all considering that he needed a very good result to compete for a rating spot in the Candidates.

Morley's picture

His real moment will come soon at the Tal Memorial. That will give him the best chance to get back into the top 5.

redivivo's picture

He will need to score +4 in Tal Memorial to reach top 5 and that won't be easy in that field when he only managed +2 here where all opponents were much weaker, I'd guess an even score for Karjakin in Tal Memorial.

S3's picture

That must be nonsense, reaching top 5 depends on the performance of his competitors as well. I agree that the chances of qualification by rating are small but I bet he'll finish with a plus.

ebutaljib's picture

My money is on Kramnik, but Karjakin's chances are not that small. He has a 7 point advantage from the July list and is currently trailling Kramnik by 28 points on the live list. But there are plenty of events until January list, so it can quickly happen that Kramnik loses 10 points while Karjakin gains 12 until January or something like that. It all depends who is going to be in better form in the following month(s).

redivivo's picture

I think Kramnik will hold on to a rating spot easily, both K's are rather stable and don't win or lose many points in top tournaments. As for Karjakin's chances to be top 5 in January that would also mean that he will have to pass Radjabov, who isn't playing Tal Memorial and that might be tough since it's 18 points between them.

Thomas's picture

Karjakin isn't that stable: he gained 12 Elo points at Bazna and then lost 13 points at the World Team Championship (what's next?). It will also depend on the European Team Championship where Karjakin, Radjabov and those currently between them (Ivanchuk and Topalov) are all playing

S3's picture

On the whole Karjakins play is pretty consistent, considering he finished 1-3 in most (all?!) regular tournaments that he played in the last 1,5 years. When he underperformed in China he might have been affected by the location and his busy schedule. And even though it looks like he is out of form and lacking energy, he still managed to finish shared first at Bazna and Poikovsky.

Thomas's picture

Yes and no - in any case I think I refuted redivivo's statement. Something changed in Karjakin's career recently after Bazna and after entering the top5: more pressure including first board at the World Team Championship. Sure, location and climate were tough, but everyone faced the same conditions ... . BTW "details" mattered: if he had won rather than lost against Wang Hao in the final round, the rating loss would have been 'acceptable' (and that game could have gone either way in mutual time trouble).

As to Poikovsky: I am not even that sure whether he lacked energy or ambition: With white he twice faced the Berlin and once the Marshall - even top players don't win too often in these openings, but he had managed against Kramnik at the Russian Championship.

Karjakin may well re-enter the top5, but it might take a bit more than a few months. His next events are Tal Memorial, then European Team Championship, then ... I wonder whether Tata Steel will "ignore" him again?

S3's picture

Do you know for sure that first place is decided by TB here or are you just making assumptions ?

As for Karjakins tournament,he could have played more ambitious but that's why I used the word efficiently..Shared first with minimum effort and no danger, reasonable approach considering this tournament and his schedule. Rating qualfying chances were nearly zero before so I don't think that was his goal. +2 was predicted..

redivivo's picture

Of course, here's a Russian interview with tournament winner Bacrot, the name of the URL says enough but the text also makes it clear that it was Bacrot that won the event:

http://www.russiachess.org/news/all/bacrot_won_a_tournament_named_after_...

Thomas's picture

Before the tournament, I wrote that Poikovsky is for Karjakin what Biel was for Carlsen and what Hoogeveen will be for Kramnik: a tournament with (objectively) little to win but a lot to lose.
Now we can compare the first two results, I conclude that they are quite comparable: Both players quite exactly confirmed their current Elo, both won as expected (even if Karjakin shared first place). Karjakin scored +2, Carlsen scored +4 - but that included two wins against underdog Pelletier, and Russian tournament have no need for a weak local wildcard.
Strictly spoken, Karjakin was second on tiebreak - for the second time after Bazna by the smallest possible margin. But now there seem to be no Bacrot fans claiming that he is the one and only winner of the event ... .

On the drawing percentage: It can 'randomly' change from year to year. Last year Poikovsky had a fairly similar field, and also some premature draws. But Karjakin scored +4-1=6, and Jakovenko (who didn't get going this time) +4-2=5.
As I already mentioned Hoogeveen: Some editions had many decisive games, but in 2009 11 out of 12 games were drawn - despite a field that included Ivanchuk and Polgar (plus Giri and Tiviakov).

ebutaljib's picture

In the meantime there is also a much more interesting tournament in Saratov, also category 19 as Poikovsky. Morozevich is leading with superb 5/6. Today we saw Shirov vs. Morozevich - total and utter kaos is what you get when these two are playing. In the end it was a 80 moves draw, but it had everything chess has to offer. Really everything! Pure +5 hours of nailbitting action from start until the very end. Those who missed it can really regret it.

S3's picture

What you call much more interesting is called much worse play by others.
And I wonder, would you make the same comment if Morozevich, responsible for almost half of the decisive games, would not be there.

ebutaljib's picture

Well this is what I'm saying all along - you only need one interesting game per round. If you have that all other games can end in short draws, but you simply just won't care because although you have all games opened in the viewer, you are actually watching only one of them - the most interesting one. And that is enough.

Amos's picture

Yeah, that Shirov-Morozevich game was an amazing piece of art. Including Shirovs escapology trick at the end.

adam's picture

"Today we saw Shirov vs. Morozevich - total and utter kaos is what you get when these two are playing."
I loved this comment and absolutely agree. :D

Septimus's picture

Wow wow wow!!! Motylev deserves a brilliancy prize or something. That was simply superb!

stevefraser's picture

Very high percentage of draws?...A easy cure: “If a checkmate or resignation has not occurred, play will continue until both players have played sixty moves. The first player who on the move brings about a three time repetition of the position loses. A stalemated player loses”.

Amos's picture

If you knew how many intuitive sacrifices are made thinking "If I don't find anything later, surely there will be some kind of perpetual here.", I doubt you would propose that threefold repetition means a loss. Such a rule would make chess much more boring than draws before move 60. Not to mention boring drawn positions being played out until move 60.

cak's picture

With this rule there would also be some weird "winning perpetuals". For instance Bxg2 in Polgar's game against Svidler would be a winning move since white is forced to repeat.

Rule changes should not ruin the game.

stevefraser's picture

Very high percentage of draws?...A easy cure: “If a checkmate or resignation has not occurred, play will continue until both players have played sixty moves. The first player who on the move brings about a three time repetition of the position loses. A stalemated player loses”.

Excalibur's picture

Can someone tell me how Radjabov figures in the candidates rating?

Excalibur's picture

Can someone tell me how Radjabov figures in the candidates rating?

fen's picture

Not very well.‎

The eight competitors for the 2012 Candidates Tournament consist of the following:‎

‎1. The first, second, and third place winners of the 2011 World Cup. They are: Svidler, Grischuk, and ‎Ivanchuk.‎

‎2. The player who loses the 2012 World Championship Match. Either Anand or Gelfand.‎

‎3. The top three players who have the highest average FIDE rating from the lists of July 2011 & January ‎‎2012. A reasonable guess might be Carlsen, Aronian, and Kramnik or Karjakin. Radjabov was ranked 14th in ‎July 2011.‎

‎4. One nominated player by the Organizer. Usually a player from the hosting nation.‎

So unless Azerbaijan hosts he basically has no chance.‎

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