Reports | November 15, 2011 12:40

ECU's dress code and anti-draw rules in detail

ECU's dress code and anti-draw rules in detail

The dress code and anti-draw rules that were accepted by the ECU General Assembly last week, have been posted online. On Monday, November 14th on the website of the Danish Chess Federation an article was published about this subject with links to two PDF documents. So far these documents don't seem to be available on the European Chess Union's own website, but we can safely assume that the version of the Danish Federation is the one that was voted upon by the ECU General Assembly.

Dress code

Let's start with the dress code rules, which resulted in some discussion below our article of last week. The PDF document (download here) was signed already on May 31st by the ECU Dress Code Commission, consisting of Chairman Herman Hamers (NED), Peter Rajcsanyi (HUN) and Olena Boytsun (UKR) - ACP. After an introduction, the following proposal is given:

Dress Code for the participants and the officials in the ECU competitions (excluding Youth Championships)

All participants as well as the officials (arbiters, captains and others being in the playing area) must comply with the Dress Code of the ECU. Participants and officials will present themselves in a neat and clean appearance.

Dress rules for the players during the games

In general, players are required to follow the code of casual dressing which means:

  • for men dress trousers or jeans, a long-sleeve or shirt-sleeve dress shirt, alternatively T-shirt or polo, loafers or dressy slip-ons, socks, shoes or sneakers (no beach-wear slips, etc.) and, if appropriate, a sport coat or blazer. The trousers, the jeans as well as the shirts and polo’s worn should be crisp and show no excessive wear, no holes and shall be free of body odor.
  • for women blouses, turtleneck, T-shirts or polo’s, trousers, jeans or slacks, skirts, dresses, and appropriate footwear (boots, flats, mid-heel or high-heel shoes, sneakers with sock) or any other appropriate clothing modification.
  • a jacket, vest or sweater, a scarf, as well as jewelry (earrings, necklace, etc.) coordinated to the outfit may be worn.
  • the pieces of the clothing should be crisp, show no excessive wear, no holes and shall be free of body odor.
  • in respect to shirts, the second from the top button may also be opened in addition to the very top button.
  • sunglasses, glasses, neck ties can be worn during the games, no caps or hats, except for religious reasons
  • in general, this category of appearance demands a pulled-together, harmonious, complete look with colors, fabrics, shoes, and accessories, for both men and women.
  • national costumes which fit into the generally accepted dress code and are not offensive or indecent to others can be worn

Dress rules for the winning players or the winning teams during prize-giving ceremonies

  • the rules set for these events are valid for a player or any member of a team, including the captain and the delegation chief who is rewarded by a prize in the chess event and thus he/she appears and receives the award in front of the other players and the audience
  • such a person shall follow the dress code of business casual (or by another name elegant casual) which means long trousers, shirt, jacket, with or without tie (no t-shirts, no polo, no jeans, no sports shoes or sneakers or slippers, no hats or caps -except for religious reasons-) and the equivalent style of dress for the women players.
  • national costumes which are not offensive or indecent to others may be worn.
  • it is recommended that teams should be uniformly dressed even if a team uniform is not available.
  • a special set of rules is established for the European Individual Championship award ceremonies where the dress code is informal which means a suit with tie, appropriate shoes and the equivalent style of dress for the women player. National costume may be worn in the event.

Dress code for the arbiters and officials of ECU events

  • whenever the arbiters and officials of an ECU chess event appear on the scene in their official capacity, they are tied to follow the dress code of business casual
  • if they visit the official venue, especially the game halls of the event, they are allowed to follow the casual dress code.
  • if any person of the above-mentioned pool is committed to participate in the award-giving ceremony in his/her official capacity, he/she shall follow the informal dress code.

Tournament Officials will have the right to give official warning to any player not properly attired. The first warning will be a verbal one. When a player is a member of a team, his/her captain will also be informed. The second time a player will be in breech with the Dress Code he/she will receive a second warning. This warning will be confirmed to the player in writing the same day. When a player is a member of a team, his/her captain will receive a copy of this warning the same day. The player received the written warning will present him/herself to the tournament officials, if it is a team player accompanied by the captain, one hour before the start of the next round. If a player is then still in breech of the Dress Code he/she can be send back to dress appropriately. If he/she does not cooperate, he/she will be denied access to the playing area.
A player not dressed according to the Code can be refused to attend the opening or closing ceremony. Tournament Officials can likewise act towards arbiters, captains or others being present in the playing area. Spectators not properly attired will have to leave the playing area.

The document also mentions that the proposal is not aimed at the Mitropa Cup and youth championships of U8-U14 while for U16 and U18 championships specific rules will be established.

Anti-draw

The rule to prevent short draws will probably be accepted with less grumbling. The PDF document (download here) was signed on June 1st by Chairman Anil Surender (SWE), Lars-Henrik Bech Hansen (DEN) and Laurent Fressinet (FRA). Their recommendations to the General Assembly were:

  • that draw offers before move 40 should be forbidden in all ECU competitions;
  • that senior events should be excluded from this regulation;
  • that ECU should review the qualifying system for the FIDE World Cup.
Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

guitarspider's picture

"in respect to shirts, the second from the top button may also be opened in addition to the very top button."
So generous!

I also love how "shall be free of body odor" is mentioned specifically for men, then another time as a general point. Somebody on the ECU boards must have played some smelly opponents.

Yetispotter's picture

Completely Nuts!I'm surprised they don't mention brown shirts and shiny leatherboots..Boycot ECU...Boycot FIDE!

deadeurope's picture

I know this kind of people who make these detailed rules of how other people should behave or look, they are psychologically ill, obviously; however you often see them in charge of committees nobody else wanted to join. Time to put up resistance.

Steve Giddins's picture

These dress code rules threatens the whole existence of our game,a s explained on my latest blog entry: http://stevegiddinschessblog.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/clothes-maketh-the....

Yetispotter's picture

Good blog,Steve! I wonder what Magnus Carlsen will do : No longer being able to accept prizes wearing his sponsered RAW-Clothes!

Mauricio Valdes's picture

No shirt, no shoes, no service!

Pulern's picture

There is something seriously wrong with everything here. How come the chess community continuously manage to vote in people like Ilyumzhinov and Danilov? I´ve worked with marketing/management of online egaming (i.e. gambling ;-) for several years and I have to say I´m amazed at how incompetent chess organizations (from FIDE to my local club) are at management and marketing.

At the moment the only thing holding chess together are the online chess sites and a couple of organizers.

Alex's picture

I think some dress code is a good idea. Clean clothes and no strange smells, this is normal and will improve the image of chess. They should also ban smoking near tournament halls.

Harry Caray's picture

"...shall be free of body odor."
Looks like the French will be facing a lot of defaults in ECU events.

tesholama's picture

These rules are absolutely crazy. They smell, because that is the key of it, of the third Reich philosophy. So what about the people who have a more pronounced smell than the others? Keep them in a corral or secluded them in a glass box? Are we going to use a smell meter? So, then the glorious Tal who was a chain smoker and also a Jewwould have to send to a Nazi cleaning factory before being alolowed to performe…I am a man of culture, an art expert and a retired museum curator…I cannot believe that what I am reading is true…However with a president, fan of ferocious aliens and despicable dictators and with an other one, a bully (who is a private manager too), who invented the rules of Sofia, I have the feeling that in spite the large expansion of chess, men are reaching new summits of abjection….

tesholama's picture

These rules are absolutely crazy. They smell, because that is the key of it, of the third Reich philosophy. So what about the people who have a more pronounced smell than the others? Keep them in a corral or secluded them in a glass box? Are we going to use a smell meter? So, then the glorious Tal who was a chain smoker and also a Jewwould have to send to a Nazi cleaning factory before being alolowed to performe…I am a man of culture, an art expert and a retired museum curator…I cannot believe that what I am reading is true…However with a president, fan of ferocious aliens and despicable dictators and with an other one, a bully (who is a private manager too), who invented the rules of Sofia, I have the feeling that in spite the large expansion of chess, men are reaching new summits of abjection….

Septimus's picture

Sounds like the TCF i.e Taliban Chess Federation. These are grown men and women, not 2nd grade kids. Stupid.

stevefraser's picture

TCF...Is that why men and women don't play against each other for the world championship...or have the same titles.

Guillaume's picture

Ridiculous. There's not a single rule in this absurd list that is not laughable in its own right.

I's be curious to know which type of indecent national costumes they had in mind.

Niima's picture

Regardless of what we think of the rules, some of them seem vague enough to cause controversy in implantation. Who and how would judge body odor or excessive wear, for example?

If the answer is that common sense would guide, then why have such specific rules? Have there been many cases of foul-smelling chess players disturbing people around them?

This approach will create more problems than it will solve.

Niima's picture

Regardless of what we think of the rules, some of them seem vague enough to cause controversy in implantation. Who and how would judge body odor or excessive wear, for example?

If the answer is that common sense would guide, then why have such specific rules? Have there been many cases of foul-smelling chess players disturbing people around them?

This approach will create more problems than it will solve.

Jens Kristiansen's picture

"The rule to prevent short draws will probably be accepted with less grumbling."!? Well, I am grumbling! I find this rule completely silly and superfluous. What if the position at the board has become plain dead before move 40 (it does happen now and then)? Should the players just move pointlessly back and forth for some 10-15 moves? Well, I guess they will find the solution, the players did in the short period in 60es, when FIDE tried to implement a 30-moves rule: They will, by silent, mutual agreement, construct a threefold repition. And that is still allowed.
But...we will for sure experience some rather bizarre and unworthy episodes in that connection.

Jens Kristiansen's picture

"The rule to prevent short draws will probably be accepted with less grumbling."!? Well, I am grumbling! I find this rule completely silly and superfluous. What if the position at the board has become plain dead before move 40 (it does happen now and then)? Should the players just move pointlessly back and forth for some 10-15 moves? Well, I guess they will find the solution, the players did in the short period in 60es, when FIDE tried to implement a 30-moves rule: They will, by silent, mutual agreement, construct a threefold repition. And that is still allowed.
But...we will for sure experience some rather bizarre and unworthy episodes in that connection.

SadTruth's picture

I think the dress code is pretty normal. Though I imagine it could be problem to some of the winning players.

Theun's picture

There we go again, making exceptions for religious folks, aboslutely ridiculous

Lobster's picture

Yes, it would be much better to require headgear, except for atheists.

stevefraser's picture

Or Jacobians.

stevefraser's picture

Or Jacobians.

exchessplayer's picture

"…The trousers, the jeans as well as the shirts and polo’s worn should be crisp and show no excessive wear, no holes and shall be free of body odor…" !!! haw haw haw… ridiculous… haw haw haw… time to take a licence in another sport… chess is becoming boring

Janis Nisii's picture

It.was.about.time!
I think chess players shouldn't focus on the small details or on the little possibility to really enforce some of them (someone pointed out the 'body odor'one, for example).
I believe that they will be applied gradually and with common sense (or at least I hope so). They're meant to remind chess players that they're not on the beach, playing soccer or at the pub, but they're playing a sport competition, there are many people who are working on the event and financing it and many spectators and chess enthusiastics who will watch the event live, in streaming or through the photos.
It shouldn't be necessary, but we all know that it is. I've seen (and smelled) all kind of things, seriously!
I strongly think that these rules go in the right direction. In every other sport people wear some kind of uniform, and they're all nice and tidy.
I remember when I was in the organizazion of some motorcycle road racing championships, there were many rules on behaviour and it was compulsory to start with a perfect clean bike AND leathers+helmet. You weren't allowed to start the race if you didn't comply. It was explained as a sign of respect for the sport.
It makes a lot of sense to me. After all it's the same grounds and reasons to shake hands, being polite, greet people and many other things we do in our everyday life and that are generally accepted as right.

Stephen's picture

The people that complain about the dress code as an infringement of their rights are the same ones who thought that the smoking ban was an infringement of their rights too - they're missing the point completely. If you have respect for yourself and other chessplayers you will already dress properly anyway. It's about time that chess started to take itself seriously. If those inside the sport don't, then how can we expect those outside to ? I'm not a big fan of Mr. Danailov, but I can't fault him on this one.

AlvaroFrota's picture

When a bureaucrat has nothing to do, he invents a regulation.

Barone (Italy)'s picture

Picture the scene:

- Arbiter, Arbiter!
- Yes, Player?
- My opponent SMELLS! I therefore require his/her disqualification for indecent chemical assault, and immediate victory for me!

Is this supposed to give Chess a better and more professional image?

IF Korchnoy has any problems of the kind of my similarly aged diaper-waring granpa (all respect, here: we ALL get older, IF we're LUCKY), it seems they finally found a way to force his retirement: he was seriously disrespecting modern/computer-age players by beating them so many times!

Barone (Italy)'s picture

The meaning is:
if you want to introduce such a regulation, when you have to go and tell people their way of dressing, or eating (which is very much involved in their sweating), you should first of all THINK deeply about HOW will that regulation be applied IN PRACTICE!
If somebody goes on your face, in the middle of the hall, Speaking out loud about how much use your pants have seen or how much you're sweating, or how "slutty" your attire might look (for girls: it's quite the popular insult...)...
Well, maybe in some stressed tornament conditions your reactin could be quite phisical: is the publicity stunt worth the price of risquing the "Game of Kings" to appear on the news with some street-fighting accident?

HOW will a player complain about his opponent dressing or smelling?
WHERE will the arbiter address such a delicate and personal complain with the accused player?

Munroe's picture

Guys, I think it's just common sense (some over-reacting here)... Unless you are attending a prize giving!

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