Reports | March 03, 2012 14:22

Kasparov on the Russian elections

Kasparov on the Russian elections

Despite growing protests in his country, tomorrow Vladimir Putin will most probably be re-elected as President of Russia. Garry Kasparov is still active in the opposition movement and was interviewed for CNBC.

Don't worry, we won't turn this website into a political platform. But we do know that many chess fans out there are still very much interested in what the 13th World Champion, Garry Kasparov, is involved in these days.

Yesterday Kasparov was interviewed for CNBC about the Russian presidential elections. CNBC is a well-known satellite and cable television business news channel in the U.S., owned and operated by NBCUniversal. The network and its international spinoffs cover business headlines and provide live coverage of financial markets. The combined reach of CNBC and its siblings is 390 million viewers around the world.

Kasparov started off by saying

I'll be very cautious of calling this 'election'. It's more like a special operation to bring Putin back to the Kremlin. He's in full control of legislation, of mass media. He controls the money. That cannot be spent on opposition without punishment from the government. We all widely expect now the most problematic election process in the modern Russian history. But for the first time, we'll be able in Moscow, to have a parallel count and reveal the real numbers behind Putin's popularity. It's the first time when we have tens and even hundreds of thousands of people in the streets in Russia, and I would call it some kind of revolution. People are sick and tired of Putin's lies, corruption and lack of future. Putin is not facing some opposition groups. He's not facing liberals or nationalists of the left wing groups. He's facing the middle, and the middle class demands free and fair elections and the opportunity to build their own lives without constant interference by Putin's regime.

Like everyone, Kasparov is sure that Putin will be declared the winner on Sunday night, but

I don't think he has any chance of surviving for six years. I think his days are numbered.

You can see the full interview here.

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

Frits Fritschy's picture

Putin's dates are numbered? That must be in his little red book!

Parkov's picture

not chess, not interested

archimedes's picture

How sad.

archimedes's picture

How sad.

Parkov's picture

Yes, tell me. How sad? This is a chess website, if I want to read about the Russian election I'll do so in the appropriate venue. What's next, Magnus Carlsen fashion watch? Levon Aronian on jazz? What Vladimir Kramnik had for breakfast this morning?

mihajovics's picture

please, have Aronian on jazz!

archimedes's picture

Good ideas.

KingTal's picture

We shouldn´t forget that Kasparov has got some award for his activities for the defence of United States and its "values" around the world long time ago and still does, so in other words he supports the interests of the USA, which is without a doubt a direct strategical enemy of the Russian country. Simple conclusion: he is a traitor to the Russian nation and his actions aim at the destabilisation of the Russian country.

Xeno's picture

Traitor to the Russian nation?! LOL

KingTal's picture

Serving foreign countriy`s politics, specially that of direct enemies against your country is called treason.

breaker19r's picture

Kasparov speaks for himself and his country, not the United States. Calling him a traitor is absurd. Also, because the U.S. and Russian governments don't see eye to eye on how to best govern their people, it doesn't make them 'enemies'.

redivivo's picture

Of course, but in some Russian circles the definition of traitor is someone who doesn't support Putin :-)

KingTal's picture

The communist party, which should have won the elections in 2011, which was rigged in Putins party´s favor, is the only opposition force in that country nowadays and they surely don´t support Putin and don´t scream for inner state massacres(revolution), like the foreign country living "opposition" servants.

Anthony's picture

KingTal is absolutely right. Kasparov's backers are New York bankers. He's doing their bidding in destabilizing Russia. If Soros cs get their chance they'd love to stage one of their color revolutions there and Kasparov will have laid the groundwork.

Parkov's picture

You're a crackpot, I don't know why CV still allows you to post your nonsense

anonymous's picture

The word 'enemy' is very equivocal. If Putin thinks he is a traitor then he is a coward for not having him arrested. Therefore I don't think Putin shares your opinion.

noyb's picture

If Garry was a traitor to his country, he wouldn't remain a Russian citizen, and try to create change in a legal manner from within. You should keep your mouth shut and stick to observations about things you understand (whatever that might be...).

MiniMe's picture

We have freedom of speech, everybody has the right to speak his mind, didn't you appreciate it ? than you shut your mouth and keep your stupid logic to yourself.

Mike's picture

A country with not enough developed institutions, due to whatever historic reason, is always submitted to the pressure of two antagonist forces: 1) The one coming from some internal elite government, 2) The one coming from external dominant interests. Because of the long term past exception regime, the majority of the population of such Country was not able to develop its democratic self-defensive institutions. So that population will rely on the paternalist care of one or another of the a.m. dominant forces, until it finally can emerge to freedom. It took centuries to my Country to achieve this milestone, now we can kick some 1st. World asses... So who is best now for Russia? Putin's or Kasparov's dominant groups?? You have to choose now.

S3's picture

Putin. At least there is some stability in him.

anonymous's picture

Things were also 'stable' under Stalin.

S3's picture

Indeed, Stalin too 'd be better for the country. Anything but Kasparov.

CR's picture

Thanks S3 for demonstrating your totalitarian mindset. You are an idiot.

S3's picture

You're welcome. But do you really think Kasparov is any better than Putin? He has demonstrated his character time and time again; dishonest, corrupt and selfish. Not someone you want in politics or government.

Anonymous's picture

If you really don't know who Stalin was - go back to school. And please don't troll around on quality websites like chessvibes.

CR's picture

If you really don't know who Stalin was - go back to school. And please don't troll around on quality websites like chessvibes.

S3's picture

Now who is the one with the totalitarian mindset?

LL's picture

Kasparov does his country a great service by denouncing the systemic corruption, the worst cancer in any society. But I'd think the Russians should really set about developing a political culture and parties, with leaders discussing concrete socio-economical problems and reforms (e.g. tax levels, judicial transparency, political appointments, petiotioning, rather than merely bashing Putin. For the moment it is just too easy for him to point at the opposition's emptiness,

Boybawang's picture

Kasparov for President? He's used of sacrificing lots of pieces! He will do it to humans!

anonymous's picture

Karpov doesn't like Kasparov's politics.

steve's picture

i think cv posts this articles for the stupid comments. soon, it will be like a yahoo message board. but!, whatever gets people here i guess

Zeblakob's picture

It is very dispointing to say "american values", the values are universal (except if you are talking about cowboy values) ;)

Opinion's picture

Yes, one of the universal value is to screw others, and to screw as much as possible. Reasoning is very simple here, does West or USA interested in positive improvements for the sake of Russia and its people ? The answer is no, and if anybody thinks otherwise (crazy people), I refer you to the countless examples in history.

Now taking one step further, whom the West and USA support in Russia and whom they oppose ? Math here is actually very simple, as you can be sure those whom the West and USA support are for the interests of the West and USA (West), while those whom they oppose are AT LEAST not for the interests of USA and West. Anyone with at least half a brain will understand that.

Russians must be for Putin because he is the only strong leader in the country, and the very fact of Putin being opposed so enthusiastically by West must give russians the hint that they are indeed doing the right thing by sticking with Putin for now.

Xeno's picture

The commentary on this site is just getting funnier and funnier

Ardjan Langedijk's picture

It seems -amazingly- not only Russians are affected by Putins propaganda that paints the US as its enemy. It's the same everywhere, from Syria to Iran to Russia; you have a domestic problem, choose a foreign scapegoat! Even chessplayers, whom you'd think are intelligent people, fall for this century old trick. Of course, Kasparov shouldn't and won't be President of Russia, but surely he's guiding Russians in the right direction.

Opinion's picture

You are good, if you guys win, you really deserve it, and the losers deserve their fate.

Opinion's picture

Nice comment, US propaganda. Every country seeks its own interests, and interferes into other countries domestic problems only because of its own interests, quite a simple thing...one must be really mentally challenged to question that.

Xeno's picture

As every true supporter of Mugabe, Stalin, Kim Jong-un etc would have it, all critical opinions from within or outside the country means treason or being against the country in question, wonderful logic

Opinion's picture

That's not my logic, actually. I laid out the logic quite simply to grasp for every human being with at least half a brain. My logic is that every country seeks only its own interests, and nothing more, no mother Teresa in politics, everything is based on cold pragmatism.

Xeno's picture

"Russians must be for Putin" is what you stated. Maybe one should let the Russians decide themselves what they must, some are critical and not because they are mentally challenged, have half a brain or are traitors, Russians or not

Opinion's picture

"Russians must be for Putin" - so is this all you have read and grasped from my post ? I stated my opinion, and gave arguments of why I think my opinion is right, that is all I did. "let the Russians decide themselves" is not an argument, but a largely meaningless wordplay. All people commenting on the issue were stating their opinions about what they think is the right course for russians, but those opinions without arguments worth nothing.

"some are critical and not because they are mentally challenged, have half a brain or are traitors, Russians or not" - I didn't state those critical of Putin are mentally challenged, have half a brain or are traitors. You seem to really have problems with grasping the meaning.

Opinion's picture

Nice comment, US propaganda. Every country seeks its own interests, and interferes into other countries domestic problems only because of its own interests, quite a simple thing...one must be really mentally challenged to question that.

Anthony's picture

The cool difference between Chessbase and Chessvibes is that Peter allows comments.

Chessbase will give you all sorts of politically correct brainwashing from Kasparov's political adventures to women's lib, but people can't speak their mind. That's why I don't go there anymore, which is a shame, because sometimes they have nice stuff.

But if kasparov's adventures are posted, for which a case can be made as he is our 13th World Champion and a totally brilliant one at that, then it is good that people can speak their mind, so that we are not relegated to the illusion of hero worship.

Thanks Peter, I don't think you care much for my 'political' comments, but you serve the public by managing the discourse in terms of civil correctness, and not political correctness.

Hats off.

brabo's picture

I am also no big fan of Chessbase as can be seen in a recent message on my blog (unfortunately in Dutch), see http://schaken-brabo.blogspot.com/2012/02/desinformatie-van-chessbase.html.

Damian's picture

Kasparov out!!

Anonymous's picture

There were huge protests in Moscow denouncing Putin. It is a police state, so speaking out only leads to trouble.

Opinion's picture

I don't think it is a police state, there are countries like China, which are way closer for term "police state". But that is not even important. What is important is, why foreign western powers all of a sudden are so interested in well being of Russia and russian people ? That is the question to consider.

MJul's picture

Oil.

redivivo's picture

"why foreign western powers all of a sudden are so interested in well being of Russia and russian people ?"

Putin doesn't get better or worse depending on what people in other countries think of him, you could say the same thing about North Korea and claim that no one in the West cares about the North Koreans so the North Koreans must support the most authoritarian leader (in case they had an alternative). What matters is what there is to like or not to like, just like people all over the world debates Bush and Obama not just with the intention of having America fall apart by supporting the leader that is worst for the Americans.

Opinion's picture

"Putin doesn't get better or worse depending on what people in other countries think of him, you could say the same thing about..." - what I said was different than that, you are already the second who misses my point and constructs some conclusions I didn't make or imply.

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