Reports | March 21, 2012 10:38

European Championship starts with many upsets (and a dress code)

European Championship starts with many upsets

The European Championship started on Tuesday in Plovdiv, Bulgaria. There was quite a number of upsets in the first round: IM Filiop Pancevski beat GM Andrei Volokitin, FM David Klein won against GM Ivan Saric and IM Evgenija Ovod defeated GM Eltaj Safarli, to name a few. Besides, the new ECU dress code is in effect at the tournament.

A scene from the opening ceremony of the European Championship | All photos courtesy of the official website, more here

Event Europen Championship | PGN via TWIC
Dates March 20th-31st, 2012
Location Plovdiv, Bulgaria
System 11-round Swiss
Players

The are fifteen 2700 players: Fabiano Caruana, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Dmitry Jakovenko, Anish Giri, Alexander Riazantsev, Nikita Vitiugov, Etienne Bacrot, Baadur Jobava, Boris Grachev, Vladimir Malakhov, Viktor Laznicka, Sergei Movsesian, Arkadij Naiditsch, David Navara and Emil Sutovsky

Rate of play 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to finish the game, with 30 seconds increment from move 1
Prize fund € 100,000 in total, with a € 14,000 first prize 

The 13th European Individual Chess Championship started yesterday. It is open to all players representing chess federations which comprise the European Chess Union (FIDE zones 1.1 to 1.10) regardless of their title or rating. There is also no limit in the number of participants per federation. There is a total prize fund of € 100,000 with a € 14,000 first prize.

As always, the tournament is a qualifier event for the next World Cup. According to FIDE regulations and the decision of the ECU Board, 23 players will qualify. After last year's issues with the tiebreak rules, the organizers are now doing it as follows:

The order of players that finish with the same number of points shall be determined by application of the following tie-breaking procedures in sequence, proceeding from (a) to (b) to (c) to (d) the extent required:

(a) Performance Rating, the highest number wins;
(b) Buchholz cut-1, the highest number wins;
(c) Buchholz, the highest number wins;
(d) Number of wins, the highest number wins.

The opening ceremony took place on Monday night in the "Bendida" Hall of the Novotel Plovdiv.

Among the official guests were Svilen Neykov (Minister of Physical Education and Sports), Mrs. Menda Stoyanova (Member of Parliament and Chairman of the "Budget and Finance" Commission), Zdravko Dimitrov (Regional Governor of Plovdiv) and Ivan Totev (Mayor of Plovdiv)

Zdravko Dimitrov announced a gift to the chess community: the creation of a Chess House in the Old Town.

The cultural program of the ceremony included dances of the Ensemble"Trakia"

In the absence of top seed Fabiano Caruana of Italy, the drawing of lots (well, the color for board 1 in the first round) was done by reigning European Champion Vladimir Potkin of Russia, who picked the black pieces in the form of a stylized bottle of red wine

The championship is an 11-round Swiss with games from March 20 to 25 and March 27 to 31, starting 3 pm local time. The rate of play is 90 minutes for 40 moves plus 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an increment of 30 seconds per move, starting from move one.

There are no less than fifteen 2700 players in Plovdiv: Fabiano Caruana, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Dmitry Jakovenko, Anish Giri, Alexander Riazantsev, Nikita Vitiugov, Etienne Bacrot, Baadur Jobava, Boris Grachev, Vladimir Malakhov, Viktor Laznicka, Sergei Movsesian, Arkadij Naiditsch, David Navara and Emil Sutovsky.

There are some special rules in effect in Plovdiv. To start with, communication between players (the offer of draw) is forbidden until the 40th move has been played. The zero tolerance rule will apply, meaning that all participants must have taken their places in the playing hall before the start of chess game.

Ad then there is the much discussed dress code. For sake of completeness, we'll give it in full here:

13. Dress Code for the participants and the officials (excluding Youth Championships)

13.1 All participants as well as the officials (arbiters, captains and others being in the playing area) must comply with the Dress Code of the ECU.

Participants and officials will present themselves in a neat and clean appearance.

13.2 Dress rules for the players during the games

In general, players are required to follow the code of casual dressing which means:
- for men dress trousers or jeans, a long-sleeve or shirt-sleeve dress shirt, alternatively T-shirt or polo, loafers or dressy slip-ons, socks, shoes or sneakers (no beach-wear slips, etc.) and, if appropriate, a sport coat or blazer. The trousers, the jeans as well as the shirts and polo’s worn should be crisp and show no excessive wear, no holes and shall be free of body odor.
- for women blouses, turtleneck, T-shirts or polo’s, trousers, jeans or slacks, skirts, dresses, and appropriate footwear (boots, flats, mid-heel or high-heel shoes, sneakers with sock) or any other appropriate clothing modification.
- a jacket, vest or sweater, a scarf, as well as jewelry (earrings, necklace, etc.) coordinated to the outfit may be worn.
- the pieces of the clothing should be crisp, show no excessive wear, no holes and shall be free of body odor.
- in respect to shirts, the second from the top button may also be opened in addition to the very top button.
- sunglasses, glasses, neck ties can be worn during the games, no caps or hats, except for religious reasons
- in general, this category of appearance demands a pulled-together, harmonious, complete look with colors, fabrics, shoes, and accessories, for both men and women.
- national costumes which fit into the generally accepted dress code and are not offensive or indecent to others can be worn

13.3 Dress rules for the winning players or the winning teams during prize-giving ceremonies

- the rules set for these events are valid for a player or any member of a team, including the captain and the delegation chief who is rewarded by a prize in the chess event and thus he/she appears and receives the award in front of the other players and the audience
- such a person shall follow the dress code of business casual (or by another name elegant casual) which means long trousers, shirt, jacket, with or without tie (no t-shirts, no polo, no jeans, no sports shoes or sneakers or slippers, no hats or caps -except for religious reasons-) and the equivalent style of dress for the women players. - national costumes which are not offensive or indecent to others may be worn.
- it is recommended that teams should be uniformly dressed even if a team uniform is not available.
- a special set of rules is established for the European Individual Championship award ceremonies where the dress code is informal which means a suit with tie, appropriate shoes and the equivalent style of dress for the women player. National costume may be worn in the event.

13.4 Dress code for the arbiters and officials of ECU events

- whenever the arbiters and officials of an ECU chess event appear on the scene in their official capacity, they are tied to follow the dress code of business casual
- if they visit the official venue, especially the game halls of the event, they are allowed to follow the casual dress code.
- if any person of the above-mentioned pool is committed to participate in the award-giving ceremony in his/her official capacity, he/she shall follow the informal dress code.

13.5 Tournament Officials will have the right to give official warning to any player not properly attired. The first warning will be a verbal one. When a player is a member of a team, his/her captain will also be informed. The second time a player will be in breach with the Dress Code he/she will receive a second warning. This warning will be confirmed to the player in writing the same day. When a player is a member of a team, his/her captain will receive a copy of this warning the same day. The player received the written warning will present him/herself to the tournament officials, if it is a team player accompanied by the captain, one hour before the start of the next round. If a player is then still in breach of the Dress Code he/she can be send back to dress appropriately. If he/she does not cooperate, he/she will be denied access to the playing area.

13.6 A player not dressed according to the Code can be refused to attend the opening or closing ceremony. Tournament Officials can likewise act towards arbiters, captains or others being present in the playing area. Spectators not properly attired will have to leave the playing area.

 

As mentioned in the intro, there were quite a few upsets in the first round. IM Filiop Pancevski beat GM Andrei Volokitin, Dutch FM David Klein won against GM Ivan Saric and IM Evgenija Ovod defeated GM Eltaj Safarli. Tomasz Markowski even lost with White against untitled Tomas Laurusas. Our blogger Bartek Macieja had a bad start as well, with a zero against FM Eylon Nakar. GM Aleksej  Aleksandrov lost with White against FM Asaf Givon while former European Champion Zdenko Kozul was defeated by untitled Davit Lomsadze. WIM Irina Bulmaga won her game against GM Aleksander Mista while FM Adrian-Kalman Bach against GM Daniil Lintchevski. The unttled Nino Vlashki beat GM Vladislav Nevednichy and FM Daniel Hristodorescu beat GM Andrey Zontakh.

Selection of games rounds 1

PGN file

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Septimus's picture

The girls should be allowed to show some skin and cleavage. This dress code is preposterous!

Games 3 and 7 were pretty exciting.

choufleur's picture

I don't see what is exciting in game 3 : just a disaster for white.

mirlo101's picture

They could have saved a lot of time but just asking people to 'please dress smartly'.

RuralRob's picture

Or simply issue uniforms for everyone to wear, like a prep school.

Coen's picture
Bob's picture

"No caps or hats, except for religious reasons"

Well whatever I wear, maybe I wear it for religious reasons. Who are you to tell me what a religious reason to wear something is?...

"in general, this category of appearance demands a pulled-together, harmonious, complete look with colors, fabrics, shoes, and accessories, for both men and women."

This is nonsence.

bondegnasker's picture

Now there are two reasons why I will never be able to win a prize at the European championships.

Honest John's picture

"No caps or hats, except for religious reasons"

Why are religious reasons a special case of treating people diferently? This ECU rule is stupid because Europe is secular in a majority of countries and why on earth we always have to arranje special rules for religions and not the contrary: All religions to adapt themselves to a secular space without creating diferences and to attack the freedom of others? I am against this rule. ECU must give the same treatment to all players to use hats or not to give permission to all. Iam against hats in general because I consider a bad education to enter a room with a hat in the head. No teacher allows that in school, at least in a great school but I consider that no hat for religious reasons should be allowed at a chess table because chess is not a church and in any sport that is not allowed too. Chess was and is known for Gens Una Sumus and to respect all and recent controversy with iranian player showed that chess do not accept that behaviour and now this rule is creating diferences in treatment that must be out of chess. With that rule one day, a player could claim that it is time to pray and he need to put himself on his knees praying in the middle of a game just because it is for religious reasons?? Beeing weak with such rules could leave ECU to bigger problems.

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