Reports | May 30, 2012 10:20

Anand beats Gelfand in tiebreak, retains world title (VIDEO)

Anand beats Gelfand in tiebreak, retains world title

Viswanathan Anand defeated Boris Gelfand 2.5-1.5 in the rapid tiebreak on Wednesday. The Indian won the World Championship in Moscow and retained his world title for the third time. After winning the 2007 World Championship tournament in Mexico City, Anand defeated Vladimir Kramnik in 2008 and Veselin Topalov in 2010 and now emerged as the winner in Moscow as well.

Gelfand congratulates Anand at the end of the 4th tiebreak game

Event  World Championship MatchPGN via TWIC
Dates May 11th-30th, 2012
Location Moscow, Russia
System Match
Players

Viswanathan Anand & Boris Gelfand

Rate of play 120 minutes for 40 moves, then 60 minutes for 20 moves and then 15 minutes to finish the game with 30 seconds increment from move 61
Prize fund 2.55 million US $ (60% for the winner or 55% if a tiebreak is needed)
More information Read all info here
Videos ChessVibes on YouTube

 

Video of the tiebreak

A very equal match, with two players extremely close to each other in terms of both chess strength and opening preparation, came to an end on Wednesday with a tense rapid tiebreak that was won 2.5-1.5 by Anand. In the State Tretyakov Gallery in central Moscow, hundreds of spectators had come to see the showdown – more than the playing hall could hold. "It went my way," Anand commented afterwards, admitting that a fair share of luck had been involved.

The start of the tiebreak, with Gelfand playing White

Even on this very last day Gelfand didn't really play worse than his opponent, but he needed much more time on the clock. Where Anand showed a "regular" time consumption during his classical games, in the tiebreak the hallmark of his success was his speed.

The games were played at 25 minutes and 10 seconds increment per move. After each encounter there was a 10-minute break in which the players could consult two of their seconds who were backstage. With a clock counting down visibly on stage, this schedule was strictly followed and no incidents occurred.

FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov was one of the spectators | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

It was quite a different day from all the others. The level of security was much higher this time, mostly to avoid noise and other disturbances in the playing hall. We filmed the start of game 1 and then went to the press room for a while. When we wanted to film the final part of the game, we were not allowed back into the playing hall. As it turned out, it had been announced – in Russian only – that people could only leave the hall, but not re-enter, during the games.

Just when the guard at the door said njet one more time, we noticed that we were standing right next to Andrei Filatov, the main sponsor of the event. When we explained the situation, he said: "I'm having the same problem!" Amazingly, even the man who paid for everything couldn't get in! However, all this was quickly resolved when we spotted organizer Ilya Levitov in the corridor...

Gelfand started with the white pieces in the first game, which was a very sharp fight. Anand got an advantage, but it seems that with 21...Bxg3 he miscalculated. After 22.Ra3! and especially 27.Rxb7 it was the World Champion who had to watch out. Instead of 28.Qxh6 perhaps with 28.Qd3 Gelfand could have tried for more.

PGN string

Game 1 in progress, this time seen from the stage | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

In the second game Anand repeated his Rossolimo Sicilian. Probably following more home analysis he won a pawn, but Gelfand clearly had compensation with active pieces and a bishop against a knight. Later in the ending he was even playing for a win for a while, but Anand maintained his extra pawn. With much less time on the clock (basically playing on the increment at some point) Gelfand suddenly allowed his bishop to be exchanged for white's knight, and the resulting R+p vs R was a textbook win – Anand didn't even have to show it.

PGN string

The third game was arguably the most dramatic, with Gelfand having excellent chances to immediately level the score. "I was lost of course," Anand admitted afterwards. Not only in the middlegame, but also in the rook ending. Just three moves before the end, Gelfand gave away the last win, again with little time on the clock.

PGN string

Gelfand agrees to a draw - he missed several wins, the clearest shortly before the end | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

Gelfand had to win the last game with Black, and he actually got an advantage. Anand was "playing too much for a draw", as he said afterwards. However, Gelfand probably chose the wrong plan at some point and as soon as white's pieces became active on the kingside, Anand knew that the worst was behind him.

PGN string

Here are a few quotes from Anand at the press conference:

It was incredibly tense. Right now probably the only feeling you have is relief. I think I'm even too tense to be happy but I'm really relieved.

I would say that my nerves held out better. I simply held on for dear life.

The problem with such a tight match is that every mistake has a much higher value than in a match where there are mistakes going back and forth in every game. In a match where there were so few chances for me it was really an incredibly heavy blow to lose game 7. I cannot remember such a black day. I couldn't sleep. That day I really thought I'd blown the match.

Vishy Anand | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

More comments by Anand are included in our video above.

Gelfand said:

I would say that it was an equal match, and that I was better sometimes, for example in the second game. I think I had more than enough compensation for the pawn and good chances. Probably the problem of the whole tiebreak was that I was behind on the clock for most of the time. In such a situation it is sometimes difficult to find the best move on the spot, which happened with my blunders in games 2 and 3. Also in game 4 I had the advantage but because of the same problem, I failed to convert it.

Boris Gelfand | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

On Monday Hans-Walter Schmitt, a good friend of Anand and organizer of over a dozen of strong rapid chess events in Mainz, said that "Vishy must be the favorite in the tiebreak. He won almost all of my tournaments!" And indeed, Anand, who owns an apartment in Germany right next to Schmitt and who spent his last weeks before the match preparing right there, proved that Schmitt had predicted right.

The winning team: Peter Heine Nielsen, Radek Wojtaszek, Surya Ganguly, Eric van Reem, Hans-Walter Schmitt (back), Aruna Anand, Vishy Anand, Rustam Kasimdzhanov (front) | Photo thanks to Mate in Moscow

Anand pocketed approximately US $ 1.4 million (1,13 million Euro) -- 55% of the total prize fund of USD 2.55 million. Gelfand won approximately US $ 1.15 million (92,700 Euro).

According to the latest FIDE schedule, Vishy Anand will defend his title in October-November 2013 against the winner of the next Candidates tournament, to be held in March 2013.

Match score

 

 


 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Anonymous's picture

That's all he has.

Stephen's picture

congrats to vishy. commiserations to boris.

Anonymous's picture

Well, no complaints today and congratulations to a classy World Champion!

RealityCheck's picture

Viva Viswanathan Anand !!!!!

giovlinn's picture

That is what you call a RealityCheck?

RealityCheck's picture

Yes. And dont you forget it boy. Btw, Your negativity is unwelcome here. Go. Clean your room!!

giovlinn's picture

Excuse me? Boy? Being negative? Boring games. Fact. What I've heard and read most people didn't like this match, including players. As for cleaning my room, my maid does that. You see, I have so many.

RealityCheck's picture

There is no excuse for you. Boy! You, and a sorry handful of chumps have been very negative about this match even before it started and you seemed to gain some momentum when dirty Garry voiced his irrelevant opion about who"s playing but it got you no where; just showed everyone how SHALLOW you all are. Fk off.

giovlinn's picture

Eh, I've never said ANYTHING about this match before it started...So where did you get my comments? You're delusional. Oh, the name is giovlinn, not giovlin or giavlinn. Dirty Garry? You mean like in Dirty Harry. I admire Kasparov as a player but he's a lousy human being.

RealityCheck's picture

@giavlinn Oh, ask your maid (mother) to teach you some manners boy.

giovlinn's picture

What's with that "boy" thing? Think it makes you tough? You're a weird one.

giovlinn's picture

What's with that "boy" thing? Think it makes you tough? You're a weird one.

Sligunner's picture

Twat.

RealityCheck's picture

Bitch.

S3's picture

Don't let those guys drag you down to their level realitycheck!

giovlinn's picture

WHAT level? He has shown he has no level at all.

RealityCheck's picture

@S3 You're right. I was letting the/their slander (unfounded arguments) get to me. Now, with a clear head, I can see I was getting way too emotional about it. Thanks for the tip.

Zeblakob's picture

The new rapid world champion ....

Ball 's picture

hahaha

Zen's picture

Like Korchnoi's comment to Navara, 'Only for you!' and the likes of you. But officially Anand retained the WC title.

RealityCheck's picture

Where were you in the 90's when Anand the Great was dusting the likes of Karpov, Kasparov, Kramnik, Shirov, Topalov, off in rapid play like it was nobody's business? Did you miss the Rapid run in the 21st Century when he dusted Polgar, Ponomariov, Carlsen, Morozevich and...... man shut up already.

Zeblakob's picture

..."Anand the Great", looks like "Alexandre le grand" stories ...

RealityCheck's picture

For me there is a big difference between the Anand and "Alexandre le grand" stories. I've been an eye witness to Anands' greatness. I've only read about Alexandres' fables.

Zeblakob's picture

You are not a stupid dude at all @Reality. You are able to understand the subtleties of the posts. You are a bit aggressive (unlike S3) and I know why.

Ball 's picture

Gelfand threw games. first in classical and now in rapids.

Anonymous's picture

@ Ball
Are you serious? If Gelfand would have won he would have been worshiped as a god in Israel, gotten a ton of endorsements from Israeli companies and been guaranteed at least another million + for a defense of his title.

rajeshv's picture

Congratulations to WC Vishy Anand on retaining the title yet another time!!

Tough luck to Boris who played incredibly well and showed what a player he really is!

A great contest throughout!!!

giovlinn's picture

I don't think so. What MAKES you think this was a great contest?

S3's picture

The first game, the classical win of Gelfand and the last game stood out for me. And in general it was probably one of the best played matches of the last decades. Repeating aversion of this match after each game is just disrespectful and dumb. Maybe you should have looked at something else if you didn't like this match.

Anonymous's picture

It's high time to shut up, Patzer.

sab's picture

What applies to you too since you are no different. :)

filiusdextris's picture

The recent Kramnik-Aronian match was a bazillion times better than this. Ooh, a pawn sac, which world championship matches have not had multiple pawn sacs!? FischerRandom would have been more testing of ability.

RealityCheck's picture

@giovlinn It was a great contest for the simple fact that you boy, nobody, said it was not.

abhishek's picture

very true...congrats to both of them...a v good match...

giovlinn's picture

And the winner is...Anand.
Now a REAL match for the title- Aronian versus Carlsen.

george's picture

you mean that lil punk who ran away scared shitless from the qualifiers because he did not want to face matchplay? that carlsen? lol, we need more jokers like you to comment and made absolute fools out of themselves.

giovlinn's picture

Carlsen had his own motives and it had nothing to do with fear. As for jokers , take a good look in the mirror.

giovlinn's picture

Carlsen had his own motives and it had nothing to do with fear. As for jokers , take a good look in the mirror.

george's picture

Carlsen : waaaa, I want tournaments with patzers playing in the line up so I can whup them and become WCH
Fide: go fk yourself. when you have grown the balls to play in a match come back.

Roger's picture

Carlsen had a number of good reasons not to play in the Candidates. I can virtually guarantee that cowardice was not one of them.

george's picture

oh yeah, here come the carlsen worshippers. carlsen ran away so he could face an older weaker anand in 2014. he is nothing but a scared piece of poop.

Sunil's picture

What makes you think he could qualify to face Anand in 2013 ? It is a 8 player double round robin tournament. LEts see if he qualifies..

george's picture

Exactly, I doubt he will even qualify. Unless Fide makes the qualifiers a tournament with patzer invitees.

Sunil's picture

Now that the next candidates match is a 8 game double round robin tournament lets see how it goes and what Carlsen comes up with.

john1976's picture

Aronian failed to qualify for the WC match and Carlsen simply realised that he was not strong enough to take on the WC. What makes you think that they will produce a better match?

Anonymous's picture

Carlsen took a stand against FIDE

S3's picture

One of the problems with that statement is that Carlsen didn't have a problem with Fide cycles before and that he did play one in Libya, of all places.
You know, the country ruled by dictator Khadaffi and the event were Israeli players were not allowed to participate.

MJul's picture

Carlsen (and Adams) withdrew from the Grand Prix.

RealityCheck's picture

Well, we all know Norways' postion toward Jews, and other ethnic groups trying to seek a better life in that country. Carlsen is not the only young man in Norway making world news headlines.

S3's picture

Uff. Lately you sound a bit fractious RC. Nothing wrong with Norway but Carlsens withdrawal from Fide had clearly nothing to do with a heroic stand or something like that. Just a matter of self interest. His earlier dealings with Fide and f.e. his cheating attempts make self interest a far more likely explanation than ethical reasons.

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