Reports | June 02, 2012 13:52

Anand-Gelfand, the closing ceremony (VIDEO)

Anand-Gelfand, the closing ceremony (VIDEO)

One day after the tiebreak the 2012 World Championship match came to an end with its closing ceremony, held in the Tretyakov Gallery's Engineering Building, on the same stage where the games had been played. While we were travelling back from Moscow on Friday, we also edited the following summary video of the ceremony which includes the speeches by both Anand and Gelfand.

Here are the speeches given by both players.

Anand:

Ladies and gentlemen, I'm very happy to have played this event here in Moscow, the World Championship, and I'd like to thank a few people. First of all I'd like to thank the sponsors, Mr Filatov, Mr Timoshenko, I'd like to thank the Russian Chess Federation, the Tretyakov Gallery and everyone responsible for the superb organization. Of course I'd like to thank FIDE for their supervision. It was a very difficult and long struggle but I would like to especially say that my opponent would always come to the board, write something on the scoresheet, then come backstage and greet me warmly, and then we would come and play the game. So even though it was a tough struggle, I think my opponent Boris Gelfand contributed a lot to that it was played in the right spirit. I think his achievements in this cycle have already inspired a lot of attention for chess in Israel and I just want to wish him all the very best. I also want to say it's been wonderful to play in front of such an appreciative audience. Today we just returned from the pleasure of an audience with the Russian President. He had actually followed it and we discussed the match, which was very enjoyable. I'd also like to thank my wife and my team here, for their support. I think it would be difficult to go through such a difficult match without their help. I will go back with a lot of pleasant memories of this match and I think Moscow is a fantastic venue for it. Thank you all again.

Gelfand:

Good afternoon. I would like to thank all the people who were involved in organizing this wonderful event, this festival we've all been part of, which was followed closely, with enjoyment, by millions of spectators. It has been a holiday to me and it's a pity it is now coming to its end. I'm sure we've set new standards for organizing such events. For a long time we haven't have anything on this level, so once again thank you very much.

There is a big collection of photos by Alexey Yushenkov at the official website. We'll give a few of them which depict the key moments.

Vishy Anand, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov and Boris Gelfand next to each other in the first row

Anand would receive two trophies. The one on the right is the winner's trophy: a gilded figure in the form of a chess board rolled up into a scroll. The corners of the scroll bear the inscription: World Chess Championship Match, Moscow 2012, The State Tretyakov Gallery. It was designed by Konstantin Novikov. The playing board shows six great combinations from the history of chess. The one on the left is the Tretyakov Gallery Prize, which takes the form  of a cube of optical glass, within which is the Golden Chess Crown. The cube shape was chosen deliberately by Andrei Molchanovsky: in symbology the cube is a three-dimensional depiction of a square, representing strength, durability, wisdom, constancy and truth. The sides of the cube are designed in the form of chess boards, which symbolise good and evil and bar the way to the Golden Chess Crown, the main goal of the contestants.

Anand receives the winner's trophy from FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov...

...and not long after also the champion's ribbon and laurel wreath

Both players received a painting from main sponsor Andrei Filatov

A special Championship Envelope was produced in honour of the match, and stamped and signed by the players at the end of the ceremony

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Guillaume's picture

The laurel wreath is too small. Anand can still carry it without assistance. A shame, really.

bronkenstein's picture

Nice speeches by the champ & the challenger, and very fancy trophies/rewards. A fine ending to fine and quite ´friendly´ match ;)

PircAlert's picture

Come, let us crown him chess king of all!

Both the trophies are beautiful.. Even the FIDE president has his eyes on the crown within cube trophy. Anand's tie is hanging lose a little bit around his neck but it is a nice tie. The closing ceromony appears nicely organized. This video presentation is nice as well!

Anand, we want to see many, many more! Congratulations again.

Anonymous's picture

Re-unification is now complete. 12 long years of struggle behind us. And, what a beautiful outcome.

RealityCheck's picture

Re-unification is now complete. 12 long years of struggle behind us. And, what a beautiful outcome.

Septimus's picture

Both trophies are spectacular! Peter, can you put up more pictures of the trophies, or better still, publish an article about how they were designed? Its been a long time since I've seen anything so intricate and beautiful.

Niima's picture

Indeed the trophies are beautiful.

The paintings are nice too. Whom does the long-haired character symbolize in the painting (in the background depicting the players at the board)?

bronkenstein's picture
Anonymous's picture

It's unfortunate that they depicted a demon as somehow being involved in chess. I'm sure the Seventh Day Adventists will seize upon this since their church prophetess was adamantly against chess.

bronkenstein's picture

Back in the 19th century it also provoked controversy : <...It is the large painting of Seated Demon (1890) that brought notoriety to Vrubel. Most conservative critics accused him of "wild ugliness", whereas the art patron Savva Mamontov praised the Demon series as "fascinating symphonies of a genius"...>, from the link above.

Anonymous's picture

Infact it has nothing to do with Chess and nobody is claiming an reference. It is a museum that promotes art with a variety of creations, artifacts, and paintings. mixing religion into chess is an avoidable flight of fantasy.

Mark De Smedt's picture

I'm joining Kramnik and many others who consider chess to be a form of art, and not just a game, a sport, an educational tool and an object of scientific research. I feel it's an honor and a pleasure for chess enthusiasts that the Tretyakov gallery decided to get involved in this match. Chess has inspired art for as long as it exists, and sometimes artists use religious motives in their work, usually in subtle ways. I can certainly see some parallels between the struggle of Vrubel's demon and that of a world championship contender. Here's another weblink describing this work of art: http://www.tanais.info/art/en/vrubel5more.html

Hanseman's picture

thx for the video, Peter!

Mark De Smedt's picture

Wow, two contenders for the world title, each determined to win, yet greeting each other warmly before every game. That's an example to all of us amateurs, and it makes the crown shine just that little bit more :) Also the artistic touch of the Tretyakov gallery, materialized in such marvellous trophies, has added inspiration to the event. Good luck to the new and old world champion, to his outstanding ex-challenger, and to the talented (rather) young who are about to take a shot at becoming the new challenger.

Sam's picture

Kudos!! finally some rational comments on chessvibes .. i was loosing heart on the amount of negative vibes towards a legit challenger and a legit champion .. fans are still rational and will hopefully understand the struggle these two have come through to reach the pedestal of a title match .. it means much more than winning private tournaments .. it means winning a candidates cycle and then the championship ..

Anonymous's picture

Great ceremony!...now how to get chess on TV...After all, both darts and the national spelling bee were on ESPN last week.

Anonymous's picture

People should write them and point that out.

sam's picture

Thanks to the sportsmanship that both players exhibited through out despite tremendous expectations from home crowds. (No infamous toilet gate etc..). All chessworld has to unanimously Appreciate both.

sam's picture

Thanks to the sportsmanship that both players exhibited through out despite tremendous expectations from home crowds. (No infamous toilet gate etc..). All chessworld has to unanimously Appreciate both.

sam's picture

Thanks to the sportsmanship that both players exhibited through out despite tremendous expectations from home crowds. (No infamous toilet gate etc..). All chess-world has to unanimously Appreciate both.

perseus's picture

Obviously very well organized WCC-Match in definitely fabulous environment at the Tretyakov Gallery. Certainly a tough match consisting of more than just 'meets the eye'. Carried out in relatively good spirits all the way through actually by everybody and sectors, it seems. I liked these interpretors at the press conferences - good work. Net broadcast studio was excellent with outstanding commentators. What more one can hope? Besides Anand, this was a succes for Russians ( in media etc. - in my view ) because it was done with such a 'style' and well. Rarely, if ever, I've seen so artistically beautiful trophies and painting(s) having meaning regarding Chess.

dev's picture

Who said this duel was n't goood!
See Anand Music therapy below:

When Israeli challenger Boris Gelfand struck a ‘heavy blow’ to Viswanathan Anand’s defence of the world title by winning Game No.7, the Indian grandmaster returned to his hotel located near the Red Square and switched off from the game. He did not brood about the loss. Rather, he tuned into the British sitcom Fawlty Towers.

“On the day I lost, I watched Fawlty Towers because you want to laugh your head off,” Anand told The Sunday Express hours before travelling from Moscow to his hometown Chennai.

On other evenings after the game, the World champion watched episodes of British comedy Yes Minister and reality show Only Fools on Horses, which involves celebrities trying their hand at equestrian events. “To unwind in the evenings I would watch a mix of Yes Minister, Only Fools on Horses,” the world champion said. His wife Aruna was around to ensure that Anand remained in the right frame of mind irrespective of the outcome of the day’s duel.

When the games turned intense, 42-year-old Anand, while waiting at the backstage, would hum Jamaican reggae artist Sean Paul’s catchy number ‘She Doesn’t Mind’ till Gelfand completed his move. This song was played often when Anand’s entourage reviewed the day’s proceedings once back at the hotel.

For Anand laughter proved to be the best medicine as his decision to watch British comedy after the loss in Game 7 lightened his mood and put him at ease with just five games remaining to catch-up. Anand responded by winning Game No.8 and went on to eventually defend his title in the tie-breaker last week. It was during one of his backstage reggae-crooning breaks that Anand spotted Gelfand make a big mistake in Game 8.
“Game 8 went beautifully. I assumed Boris (Gelfand) was trying to double his lead rather than sit on it. He was very motivated but something clearly went wrong. (Anand set a trap for Gelfand which entailed Gelfand making a blunder of playing Queen to f6). And then I went backstage. I was waiting for my move. I had seen Queen f6 but I was telling myself that is too naive to expect it to happen and then I suddenly saw him make a move from the back of the board. I looked up saw it was Qf6. I thought ‘oh god!’ I came back, checked it for a few minutes and then just went for it. He thought for a while and resigned,” Anand said while looking back at his campaign, which he described as the toughest encounter of his five titles.

While he was considered the favourite going into the Championship, Anand disagreed. “I never saw myself as a favourite. There were a lot of people who kept saying I was favourite but they simply missed the plot. I expected a tough, nerve-wracking match, and I got a tough, nerve-wracking match. It would have been insane to underestimate Boris and I don’t think I would have done that. But I didn’t come here clearly with high expectations. I came here as someone who expected to fight for his life.”

RealityCheck's picture

When World Champion Anand said: "I'd like to thank a few people". ...... I thought, this could take awhile. Stevie Wonder came to mind. He's known to have credit lists a mile long, acknowledge everyone from the sponsors to the putz-.frau.

Love is the Key.... of life.

neil's picture

anand should have pressed gelfand in the classical games where he had large time advantage in an equal position instead of wimping out.
showing true champion spirit.

i just wish gelfand had played his normal game rather than letting success in game 7 go to his head.

rapid games are a poor substitute for real chess

well at least its over!

Chris's picture

Kazan, Moscow - draws, draws it is a result of Fide ruling WC

Anonymous's picture

PCA, Braingains- corruption. It's all to do with Kasparovs' involvement.

S3's picture

I'd say it was more due to GM Keene, who had been stealing and robbing money since the 80's.

Anonymous's picture

PCA, Braingames-- corruption, corruption mainly due to R. Keenes' and G. Kasparovs' involvement.

Did Kramnik ever get his Trophy back from these, Raymond Keene and G.arry Kasparov, thugs? You know they actualy stole his winners trophy from the London match. Low lifes.

Anonymous's picture

*Braingames

Anon's picture

There is everything to applaud about the match, and the two players, except for the absurdity of deciding a world champion in a four game blitz match.

FIDE is an embarrassment to chess -- silly time controls, "no tolerance", drug testing, Kirsan, and twelve game world champion matches with blitz playoffs.

Anon's picture

There is everything to applaud about the match, and the two players, except for the absurdity of deciding a world champion in a four game blitz match.

FIDE is an embarrassment to chess -- silly time controls, "no tolerance", drug testing, Kirsan, and twelve game world champion matches with blitz playoffs.

Thomas's picture

If the 'main' match had lasted 16, 20 or 24 games, a tiebreak might still be needed. And these were the first blitz games I am aware of where both players started with 25 minutes on their clocks.

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