Reports | August 27, 2012 15:10

40th Chess Olympiad starts today

40th Chess Olympiad logo

The 40th Chess Olympiad starts today in Istanbul, Turkey. The opening ceremony, which will be broadcast live in four languages simultaneously, starts tonight at 21:30 local time (20:30 CET or 14:30 EDT). The opening ceremony will be preceded by a press conference of the Turkish national teams at 19:00 local time and by the captains meeting an hour later.

The official website now has an integrated Chess-Results page with all teams and players. Last week we did a preview about which top players are playing in Istanbul (and which aren't) and today we'll give a few statistics and the composition of the strongest teams.

The Open section now has 158 teams registered while the Women's section has 131 teams. In the Open section a total of 788 players are registered. There are 240 GMs, 130 IMs, 89 FMs and 52 CMs. In the Women's section a total of 627 players are registered. There are 16 GMs, 75 WGMs, 33 IMs, 97 WIMs, 4 FMs, 89 WFMs and 50 WCMs.

We'd like to mention a competition by Fantasy Chess that gives chess fans around the world the chance to select their dream teams for the forth coming Olympiad. On this website you get the chance to your own Olympiad team and score points based on their chosen participants’ performance for their national sides. There's a range of prizes on offer for the most successful Fantasy Chess Olympiad team managers.

Here are the strongest 20 teams in the Open section (full list here).

Bo.   RUSSIA Rtg
1 GM KRAMNIK VLADIMIR 2797
2 GM KARJAKIN SERGEY 2785
3 GM GRISCHUK ALEXANDER 2763
4 GM TOMASHEVSKY EVGENY 2730
5 GM JAKOVENKO DMITRY 2722
Bo.   UKRAINE Rtg
1 GM IVANCHUK VASSILY 2769
2 GM PONOMARIOV RUSLAN 2734
3 GM MOISEYENKO ALEKSANDR 2706
4 GM VOLOKITIN ANDREI 2709
5 GM ELJANOV PAVEL 2693
Bo.   ARMENIA Rtg
1 GM ARONIAN LEVON 2816
2 GM MOVSESIAN SERGEI 2698
3 GM AKOPIAN VLADIMIR 2687
4 GM SARGISSIAN GABRIEL 2693
5 GM PETROSIAN TIGRAN L. 2661
Bo.   AZERBAIJAN Rtg
1 GM RADJABOV TEIMOUR 2788
2 GM GASHIMOV VUGAR 2737
3 GM MAMEDYAROV SHAKHRIYAR 2729
4 GM SAFARLI ELTAJ 2620
5 GM GUSEINOV GADIR 2613
Bo.   HUNGARY Rtg
1 GM LEKO PETER 2737
2 GM ALMASI ZOLTAN 2713
3 GM POLGAR JUDIT 2698
4 GM BERKES FERENC 2685
5 GM BALOGH CSABA 2668
Bo.   USA Rtg
1 GM NAKAMURA HIKARU 2778
2 GM KAMSKY GATA 2746
3 GM ONISHUK ALEXANDER 2666
4 GM AKOBIAN VARUZHAN 2617
5 GM ROBSON RAY 2598
Bo.   CHINA Rtg
1 GM WANG HAO 2726
2 GM LI CHAO 2665
3 GM WANG YUE 2685
4 GM DING LIREN 2695
5 GM BU XIANGZHI 2670
Bo.   FRANCE Rtg
1 GM FRESSINET LAURENT 2714
2 GM VACHIER-LAGRAVE MAXIME 2686
3 GM TKACHIEV VLADISLAV 2644
4 GM BAUER CHRISTIAN 2682
5 GM EDOUARD ROMAIN 2652
Bo.   NETHERLANDS Rtg
1 GM GIRI ANISH 2711
2 GM VAN WELY LOEK 2691
3 GM SOKOLOV IVAN 2696
4 GM SMEETS JAN 2608
5 GM STELLWAGEN DANIEL 2630
Bo.   BULGARIA Rtg
1 GM TOPALOV VESELIN 2752
2 GM GEORGIEV KIRIL 2682
3 GM CHEPARINOV IVAN 2681
4 GM DELCHEV ALEXANDER 2596
5 GM NIKOLOV MOMCHIL 2563
Bo.   ENGLAND Rtg
1 GM ADAMS MICHAEL 2722
2 GM JONES GAWAIN 2653
3 GM SHORT NIGEL 2698
4 GM HOWELL DAVID 2635
5 GM PERT NICHOLAS 2555
Bo.   ISRAEL Rtg
1 GM GELFAND BORIS 2738
2 GM SUTOVSKY EMIL 2687
3 GM RODSHTEIN MAXIM 2642
4 GM POSTNY EVGENY 2638
5 GM AVRUKH BORIS 2605
Bo.   INDIA Rtg
1 GM SASIKIRAN KRISHNAN 2707
2 GM HARIKRISHNA PENTALA 2685
3 GM GUPTA ABHIJEET 2637
4 GM NEGI PARIMARJAN 2664
5 GM GOPAL GEETHA NARAYANAN 2550
Bo.   GERMANY Rtg
1 GM NAIDITSCH ARKADIJ 2712
2 GM KHENKIN IGOR 2656
3 GM FRIDMAN DANIEL 2653
4 GM MEIER GEORG 2648
5 GM GUSTAFSSON JAN 2610
Bo.   CUBA Rtg
1 GM DOMINGUEZ PEREZ LEINIER 2725
2 GM BRUZON BATISTA LAZARO 2711
3 GM QUESADA PEREZ YUNIESKY 2626
4 IM BACALLAO ALONSO YUSNEL 2583
5 GM ORTIZ SUAREZ ISAN REYNALDO 2569
Bo.   POLAND Rtg
1 GM WOJTASZEK RADOSLAW 2717
2 GM BARTEL MATEUSZ 2654
3 GM SOCKO BARTOSZ 2635
4 GM SWIERCZ DARIUSZ 2594
5 GM MACIEJA BARTLOMIEJ 2594
Bo.   CZECH REPUBLIC Rtg
1 GM LAZNICKA VIKTOR 2683
2 GM NAVARA DAVID 2691
3 GM HRACEK ZBYNEK 2619
4 GM BABULA VLASTIMIL 2595
5 GM STOCEK JIRI 2569
Bo.   GEORGIA Rtg
1 GM JOBAVA BAADUR 2730
2 GM MCHEDLISHVILI MIKHEIL 2659
3 GM PANTSULAIA LEVAN 2575
4 GM GAGUNASHVILI MERAB 2578
5 GM SANIKIDZE TORNIKE 2585
Bo.   SPAIN Rtg
1 GM VALLEJO PONS FRANCISCO 2697
2 GM SALGADO LOPEZ IVAN 2638
3 GM ILLESCAS CORDOBA MIGUEL 2601
4 GM KORNEEV OLEG 2581
5 GM PEREZ CANDELARIO MANUEL 2575
Bo.   CROATIA Rtg
1 GM SARIC IVAN 2638
2 GM STEVIC HRVOJE 2614
3 GM PALAC MLADEN 2599
4 GM BRKIC ANTE 2587
5 GM KOZUL ZDENKO 2616

Here are the strongest 10 teams in the Women's section (full list here).

Bo.   CHINA Rtg
1 GM HOU YIFAN 2599
2 GM ZHAO XUE 2549
3 WGM JU WENJUN 2528
4 WGM HUANG QIAN 2449
5 WGM DING YIXIN 2424
Bo.   RUSSIA Rtg
1 GM KOSINTSEVA TATIANA 2530
2 IM GUNINA VALENTINA 2507
3 GM KOSINTSEVA NADEZHDA 2524
4 GM KOSTENIUK ALEXANDRA 2489
5 WGM POGONINA NATALIJA 2448
Bo.   GEORGIA Rtg
1 GM DZAGNIDZE NANA 2547
2 IM KHOTENASHVILI BELA 2509
3 IM JAVAKHISHVILI LELA 2458
4 IM KHURTSIDZE NINO 2444
5 WGM BATSIASHVILI NINO 2432
Bo.   UKRAINE Rtg
1 GM LAHNO KATERYNA 2542
2 IM MUZYCHUK MARIYA 2466
3 IM USHENINA ANNA 2433
4 GM ZHUKOVA NATALIA 2442
5 IM YANOVSKA INNA 2404
Bo.   USA Rtg
1 IM ZATONSKIH ANNA 2512
2 IM KRUSH IRINA 2467
3 WGM FOISOR SABINA 2356
4 IM GOLETANI RUSUDAN 2341
5 WGM AMBRAHAMYAN TATEV 2303
Bo.   INDIA Rtg
1 GM DRONAVALLI HARIKA 2503
2 IM SACHDEV TANIA 2379
3 WGM GOMES MARY ANN 2396
4 IM KARAVADE SANJAY EESHA 2371
5 WGM SOUMYA SWAMINATHAN 2271
Bo.   POLAND Rtg
1 GM SOCKO MONIKA 2467
2 IM RAJLICH IWETA 2412
3 WGM ZAWADZKA JOLANTA 2377
4 WGM SZCZEPKOWSKA KARINA 2375
5 WIM WOREK JOANNA 2287
Bo.   ARMENIA Rtg
1 GM DANIELIAN ELINA 2476
2 IM MKRTCHIAN LILIT 2454
3 IM GALOJAN LILIT 2349
4 WGM KURSOVA MARIA 2338
5 WIM HAIRAPETIAN ANNA 2203
Bo.   GERMANY Rtg
1 WGM PAEHTZ ELISABETH 2491
2 WGM MICHNA MARTA 2380
3 WGM MELAMED TETYANA 2356
4 WGM OHME MELANIE 2337
5 WGM LEVUSHKINA ELENA 2301
Bo.   ROMANIA Rtg
1 IM FOISOR CRISTINA-ADELA 2402
2 WIM BULMAGA IRINA 2380
3 WGM COSMA ELENA-LUMINITA 2352
4 WGM L'AMI ALINA 2372
5 WGM SANDU MIHAELA 2246

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Anonymous's picture

So gelfand will be playing, ¿!As a country?!

ozan's picture

Simultaneous would be interesting:)

Thomas's picture

Then he would need some help from his brother Vishy An-and. :)

Greco's picture

They finaly did it..they named Israel Gelfand...well it was about time if you ask me.

ISRAELI MOSAD's picture

We have your name and address

Peter Doggers's picture

Oops, funny mistake. Corrected!

valg321's picture

you can have the name and address of my proofreader. Its Mossad.

Anonymous's picture

should be Gefland of course

Bharath's picture

Sad to see the Vishy is not playing for India when u see all the top players representing their country. Not sure why Vishy avoids the Olympiad. Whatever the reason when I see Vlady, Gelfand, Topolov represent their nation, I feel sad that an opportunity was lost to represent your country, win or lose.

KingKong's picture

According to the chessplayers in India, there are 2 reasons:
1. The Indian chess federation treated him rather shabbily previously.
2. In the 2006 olympiad, the administrators mocked him for his high number of draws and poor performance.
Or at least thats what my friends told me.

jin's picture

kramnik n topalov boy oh boy...

Ed Dean's picture

I'm definitely hoping for a Russia-Bulgaria match.

RuralRob's picture

Come on, I know Boris is a little bit on the heavy side, but declaring him a *country* is going a bit far...

redivivo's picture

Even if Russia are the favourites they have never won with Kramnik on first board, and this time Svidler wasn't picked at all even if I think he is stronger than Tomashevsky on fourth board (and the reserve Jakovenko). Moro is also absent, but that was apparently unavoidable. Not picking Svidler is more mysterious. He is a great player and would have played his tenth Olympiad in a row if he hadn't been dropped. Tomashevsky was last in Tal Memorial and isn't comparable to the Svidler that has won the Russian Championship six times and was close to win it a seventh time this month but eventually failed in the rapid tiebreak.

Anonymous's picture

Svidler is a far better performer than those two, but I think the Russians will keep the individual performances behind them now. The problem with Svidler was his handling of team championships, particularly the last Olympiad and particularly the last round. This time they want some stronger nerves, time will tell if they have got them.

redivivo's picture

Yes, Svidler has been uneven in Olympiads, but he has scored many excellent first board results when leading Russia to titles in the World Team Championships and European Team Championships. In the ETC he played first board the last five times and was undefeated four of them. Only the last time didn't he perform clearly above his rating (even if his two losses came against higher rated players).

Thomas's picture

You always show allergic reactions when someone is "negative" (read: critical and not 120% positive) about Carlsen, yet this post is as negative as can be about other players.

"they have never won with Kramnik on first board" - technically correct but quite misleading as it was hardly Kramnik's fault. His latest Olympiad results:
2006 - 6.5/9, TPR 2847 (best of all participants)
2008 - 5/9, TPR 2735 (not as impressive, but normally it should be enough to 'hold' board 1 and score on the lower boards)
2010 - 5.5/9, TPR 2794
And earlier you found it worthwhile mentioning that Kramnik skipped a few Olympiads many years ago, now you suggest this could be good news for Russia?

On the lower boards: On board 4, Tomashevsky won't face Tal Memorial opposition. You might need a solid player capable of grinding out a few wins - Tomashevsky and Jakovenko both fit that profile, Svidler only when he is motivated which isn't always the case. You write "the Svidler that has won the Russian Championship ..." - but THIS Svidler doesn't always show up in team events.

Whychess, translating a Russian source, just mentioned the reason for Svidler's absence: He was unable to play the Russia-China match which was used to select the lower boards. He must have had his reasons to skip an event in St. Petersburg (despite living there?).
http://whychess.org/en/node/2929

redivivo's picture

"this post is as negative as can be about other players"

I'd say it's possible to be more negative than that.

Anonymous's picture

redivio, you conveniently overlooked the fact that Thomas invested so much time and digits to say what he said. Which is highly appreciated, one might say.

redivivo's picture

To me the reasons that Svidler was dropped look really stupid. Dokhoian claims in the Whychess interview that

"the most important thing in the given situation was how prepared Peter was to play for the team in this particular event. In order to find out I really wanted Peter to play for the team in the match against China, but he was unable. Therefore I took that decision"

Svidler shouldn't have to prove that he is prepared to play for the team by playing an extra team event when he couldn't. He has played every team event for Russia, and captained the team on first board to gold in Olympiad, World Team Championships and European Team Championships (more than once).

It's also clear that it was first after Svidler was unable to play against China that it was said that he would be dropped for not playing that event, where neither Grischuk nor Karjakin participated. Dokhoian's saying that Svidler wasn't prepared to play for the team in the Olympiad because he was unable to play a meaningless minimatch against China just sounds silly. He has scored many great results in team events and loves to play for Russia, no other player has never declined the chance to play Olympiad, WTC and ETC.

shver's picture

Is there live streaming of opening ceremony?

Anonymous's picture

That would be awesome

Casaubon's picture

Olympiad? What Olympiad?

The players seem to have no problem with it but I certainly won't be giving Yazici and his wretched event my support.

Anonymous's picture

+1 !!

Phewww, now I really couldn't agree more with you, Casaubon. It is a running gag indeed that the federations in questions didn't have the balls to join in to the French suggestion.

Bas1191's picture

First Olympiad since 1966 without Korchnoi :-(

Jeroen's picture

Wow! What a world record. Hope he will be there to visit and comment on some games.

Peter Doggers's picture

He didn't play in Khanty 2010 either. Besides, according to Olimpbase his first was in 1960! :-)

Thomas's picture

As we are into trivia, Korchnoi also missed a few more Olympiads (1976, 1980, 1984, 1986, 1996, 1998) - 1976 was when he defected, initially to the Netherlands.

In total, Korchnoi participated 17 times, including 11 times board 1 (for Switzerland). The record holder might be Portisch: 20 participations from 1956-2000, 13 times board 1. Anyone else?

redivivo's picture

Torre is playing his 21st now.

valg321's picture

why does Navara play second board?

Anonymous's picture

I don't have a clue, but since only 8 rating points seperate him from Laznicka, this might be purely strategical. Navara can probably win more games on board two than he would on board one. And probably Laznicka is considered to have a slight edge in the fighting department? Maybe that's why they seeded him No. 1. Only the team can tell you.

Anonymous's picture

Among others, an even more signifcant example is England's Gawain Jones, 2 (2653) swapping seeds with Nigel Short, 3 (2698).

Thomas's picture

The most extreme example might - again - be Mamedyarov (2729) playing board 3 behind Safarli (2620).

valg321's picture

many, many technical difficulties..i hope the orgs. put it together in the next round

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