Reports | September 23, 2012 21:45

Mamedyarov beats Giri in third round London Grand Prix

In the shortest and only decisive game of Sunday's third round in London, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov defeated Anish Giri. The Azerbaijani managed to surprise his Dutch opponent in the opening and won in just 21 moves. Hikaru Nakamura missed a chance to catch the leaders as he failed to convert a theoretically winning rook ending.

A miniature between Mamedyarov and Giri | Photos © Macauley Peterson

Event Grand Prix | PGN via TWIC
Dates September 20-October 4, 2012
Location London, UK
System 12-player round robin
Players Hikaru Nakamura, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter Svidler, Wang Hao, Boris Gelfand, Peter Leko, Shakriyar Mamedyarov, Leinier Dominguez Perez, Anish Giri, Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Rate of play

120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then each player will be allotted 15 minutes after the second time control and an increment of 30 seconds per move will be allowed from move 61 onwards

Extra Players will not be allowed to offer draws directly to their opponents; players will continue to play if the arbiter does not authorise the draw

Who surprised whom? That was the question at the start of the game between Mamedyarov and Giri, in the third round of the London Grand Prix. After the moves 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 the Azerbaijani GM avoided the main lines with 4.Qb3 but did not expect 4...e6. He then spent 20 minutes on 5.Bg5!? which turned out to be an excellent surprise weapon!

PGN string

Videos by Macauley Peterson

Rustam Kasimdzhanov showed the result of spending years as one of the seconds of Vishy Anand. In a Semi-Slav he could throw in a wonderful novelty that killed all White hopes for an advantage.

PGN string

Video

Gelfand, on his turn, profited from his work on the Sveshnikov Sicilian for his match against Anand in May this year. Using some nice tactics he equalized comfortably against Dominguez.

PGN string

Video

Ivanchuk and Adams drew in a quiet Nimzo-Indian, Rubinstein Variation.

PGN string

 

More interesting was Wang Hao vs Grischuk, where the Russian failed to profit from Wang's inaccuracies.

PGN string

Video

Nakamura built up a nice advantage and then liquidated to a better rook ending. At some point it was winning, but the American let it slip away.

PGN string

Video

Schedule & pairings

Round 1 15:00 CET 21.09.12   Round 2 15:00 CET 22.09.12
Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Leko   Leko 1-0 Ivanchuk
Nakamura 0-1 Gelfand   Adams ½-½ Mamedyarov
Topalov ½-½ Grischuk   Giri ½-½ Wang Hao
Dominguez ½-½ Giri   Grischuk ½-½ Dominguez
Wang Hao ½-½ Adams   Gelfand ½-½ Topalov
Mamedyarov ½-½ Ivanchuk   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Nakamura
Round 3 15:00 CET 23.09.12   Round 4 15:00 CET 24.09.12
Nakamura ½-½ Leko   Leko - Adams
Topalov ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Giri - Ivanchuk
Dominguez ½-½ Gelfand   Grischuk - Mamedyarov
Wang Hao ½-½ Grischuk   Gelfand - Wang Hao
Mamedyarov 1-0 Giri   Kasimdzhanov - Dominguez
Ivanchuk ½-½ Adams   Nakamura - Topalov
Round 5 15:00 CET 25.09.12   Round 6 15:00 CET 27.09.12
Topalov - Leko   Leko - Giri
Dominguez - Nakamura   Grischuk - Adams
Wang Hao - Kasimdzhanov   Gelfand - Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov - Gelfand   Kasimdzhanov - Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk - Grischuk   Nakamura - Wang Hao
Adams - Giri   Topalov - Dominguez
Round 7 15:00 CET 28.09.12   Round 8 15:00 CET 29.09.12
Dominguez - Leko   Leko - Grischuk
Wang Hao - Topalov   Gelfand - Giri
Mamedyarov - Nakamura   Kasimdzhanov - Adams
Ivanchuk - Kasimdzhanov   Nakamura - Ivanchuk
Adams - Gelfand   Topalov - Mamedyarov
Giri - Grischuk   Dominguez - Wang Hao
Round 9 15:00 CET 01.10.12   Round 10 15:00 CET 02.10.12
Wang Hao - Leko   Leko - Gelfand
Mamedyarov - Dominguez   Kasimdzhanov - Grischuk
Ivanchuk - Topalov   Nakamura - Giri
Adams - Nakamura   Topalov - Adams
Giri - Kasimdzhanov   Dominguez - Ivanchuk
Grischuk - Gelfand   Wang Hao - Mamedyarov
Round 11 12:00 CET 03.10.12        
Mamedyarov - Leko        
Ivanchuk - Wang Hao        
Adams - Dominguez        
Giri - Topalov        
Grischuk - Nakamura        
Gelfand - Kasimdzhanov        

London GP 2012 | Round 3 standings

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Hugh Jass's picture

If the twit did less 1/0 and mouthing he might learn endings like any european GM worth his salt.....of course expect a it wasnt my fault tweet later from the so called american...

Bartleby's picture

The twit can be proud how he outmaneuvered Leko in the phase leading into the won endgame. I don't see what exactly went wrong for Leko. I am always impressed when somebody starts from a not far from equal position, just makes a few unspectacular, logical moves, a few exchanges and ends up with real winning chances.

Anonymous's picture

Your comment is completely out of place. Yes, Naka failed to convert a theoretically won ending, but you don't see that happening very often by him. Then he is obviously not a twit but a very decent, extremely successful young man and also often surprisingly self-critical in his tweets.

Bert de Bruut's picture

Take a look in Dvortesky's endgame manual, and see how all world champion's and the likes of Carlsen and who not, are presented there throwing away wins or draws in theoretical, tablebase, positions. Nothing as hard to contain (or calculate) as the endless possibilities on an empty board!

Casey's picture

Well, if you have to know, the tweet today is...

The good, the bad and the really, really ugly finish. Draws are not quite as much fun.

He's getting pretty good at the 140-character post-game commentary.

Thomas's picture

Half-seriously, I wonder if someone else is currently taking care of Nakamura's Twitter account. The recent "sophisticated" tweets are quite different from earlier ones such as the 'self-critical' "I played like an idiot" (when he lost or even when he failed to win) or "All I can say is wow" (he won an important game). That stuff may have been closer to his genuine feelings after a game, though.

The turning point could have been Nakamura's misplaced tweets towards the end of the Olympiad - now it is at least quite ironic that he trashed Onischuk for messing up in a rook endgame.

KingTal's picture

But one has to give credit to Leko´s endgame technique, he made some only moves in time pressure to safe himself.

Also to be precise the endgame before Nakamuras Rb7 was a practically won one as the tablebases tell, not just theoretically.

Anonymous's picture

Naka played Kd5 on one move and Houdini didn't even see it!!! They said so on chessbomb. It wasn't even the top 4 choices on there.. That was a winning move and he could of won but is wierd. He only drue.

jambow's picture

Well I was truly impressed with Nakamura's methodical build up to a won a game. then more than unimpressed with his abillity to throw it away? I don't get it I could have won against Kasparov or Houdini, I was like KD5? Went back over it and several times and couldn't see how black could hold before that. Nakamura usually out plays even the top players in end games so this absolutely baffled me? He also wasted a lot of time when the answer was very simple for no reason. Sighhhhh

jambow's picture

Well I was truly impressed with Nakamura's methodical build up to a won a game. then more than unimpressed with his abillity to throw it away? I don't get it I could have won against Kasparov or Houdini, I was like KD5? Went back over it and several times and couldn't see how black could hold before that. Nakamura usually out plays even the top players in end games so this absolutely baffled me? He also wasted a lot of time when the answer was very simple for no reason. Sighhhhh

Mike's picture

So many wanabe GMs!, The guy is 2780 for gods sake!.

AAR's picture

Did Giri play a blitz game - games in my club are much better.

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