Reports | September 24, 2012 20:12

Gelfand and Grischuk winners in 4th round London Grand Prix

Gelfand and Grischuk winners in 4th round London Grand Prix

Boris Gelfand is the sole leader again at the FIDE Grand Prix in London. In Monday's fourth round the Israeli grandmaster defeated Wang Hao, who blundered mate in a drawn rook ending. After three draws Alexander Grischuk won his first game, against Shakhriyar Mamedyarov. Tomorrow the game between Gelfand and Mamedyarov is scheduled to start one hour earlier to respect Yom Kippur.

Wang Hao blunders against Boris Gelfand | Image from video feed

Event Grand Prix | PGN via TWIC
Dates September 20-October 4, 2012
Location London, UK
System 12-player round robin
Players Hikaru Nakamura, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter Svidler, Wang Hao, Boris Gelfand, Peter Leko, Shakriyar Mamedyarov, Leinier Dominguez Perez, Anish Giri, Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Rate of play

120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then each player will be allotted 15 minutes after the second time control and an increment of 30 seconds per move will be allowed from move 61 onwards

Extra Players will not be allowed to offer draws directly to their opponents; players will continue to play if the arbiter does not authorise the draw

The sunshine was short lived in London since Monday was rainy again. This weather, more typical for the UK capital of course, is quite suitable for a game of chess and that's exactly what Vassily Ivanchuk said before the start of the round! Therefore it was all the more surprising that the Ukrainian didn't play on in the final position against Anish Giri.

PGN string

Macauley Peterson, who is producing the live video and video interviews in London, chased down Ivanchuk at Covent Garden market.

After demolishing Anish Giri in the previous round, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov was less lucky the next day. Right after the opening his h7-h5 looks suspicious and Alexander Grischuk could choose between different winning plans.

PGN string

Veselin Topalov was never in trouble against Hikaru Nakamura's Alapin Sicilian. In fact the position looked better for Black at the end of the game, but "White was always very solid" (Topalov).

PGN string

Rustam Kasimdzhanov surprised Leinier Dominguez with 1.e4, when the Cuban decided to deviate from his usual repertoire by going for the Berlin. The most interesting part of the game was the bishop ending; even afterwards the players weren't sure if it was winning for White or not.

PGN string

In what they called the "New Anti-Marshall" Peter Leko and Mickey Adams drew after 47 moves. Just when the Hungarian felt he was better, his opponent made a strong move and everything was suddenly unclear.

PGN string

The longest game of the round ended dramatically. Thanks to strong preparation Gelfand won a pawn, but Wang Hao defended very well to reach a drawn rook ending. However, after a mistake by the Chinese White was winning but Gelfand missed it. Then a big blunder by Wang Hao more or less forced Gelfand to see the winning idea!

PGN string

(Jump to 04:40:50 to see the final phase of the game.)

Schedule & pairings

Round 1 15:00 CET 21.09.12   Round 2 15:00 CET 22.09.12
Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Leko   Leko 1-0 Ivanchuk
Nakamura 0-1 Gelfand   Adams ½-½ Mamedyarov
Topalov ½-½ Grischuk   Giri ½-½ Wang Hao
Dominguez ½-½ Giri   Grischuk ½-½ Dominguez
Wang Hao ½-½ Adams   Gelfand ½-½ Topalov
Mamedyarov ½-½ Ivanchuk   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Nakamura
Round 3 15:00 CET 23.09.12   Round 4 15:00 CET 24.09.12
Nakamura ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Adams
Topalov ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Giri ½-½ Ivanchuk
Dominguez ½-½ Gelfand   Grischuk 1-0 Mamedyarov
Wang Hao ½-½ Grischuk   Gelfand 1-0 Wang Hao
Mamedyarov 1-0 Giri   Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Dominguez
Ivanchuk ½-½ Adams   Nakamura ½-½ Topalov
Round 5 15:00 CET 25.09.12   Round 6 15:00 CET 27.09.12
Topalov - Leko   Leko - Giri
Dominguez - Nakamura   Grischuk - Adams
Wang Hao - Kasimdzhanov   Gelfand - Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov - Gelfand   Kasimdzhanov - Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk - Grischuk   Nakamura - Wang Hao
Adams - Giri   Topalov - Dominguez
Round 7 15:00 CET 28.09.12   Round 8 15:00 CET 29.09.12
Dominguez - Leko   Leko - Grischuk
Wang Hao - Topalov   Gelfand - Giri
Mamedyarov - Nakamura   Kasimdzhanov - Adams
Ivanchuk - Kasimdzhanov   Nakamura - Ivanchuk
Adams - Gelfand   Topalov - Mamedyarov
Giri - Grischuk   Dominguez - Wang Hao
Round 9 15:00 CET 01.10.12   Round 10 15:00 CET 02.10.12
Wang Hao - Leko   Leko - Gelfand
Mamedyarov - Dominguez   Kasimdzhanov - Grischuk
Ivanchuk - Topalov   Nakamura - Giri
Adams - Nakamura   Topalov - Adams
Giri - Kasimdzhanov   Dominguez - Ivanchuk
Grischuk - Gelfand   Wang Hao - Mamedyarov
Round 11 12:00 CET 03.10.12        
Mamedyarov - Leko        
Ivanchuk - Wang Hao        
Adams - Dominguez        
Giri - Topalov        
Grischuk - Nakamura        
Gelfand - Kasimdzhanov        

London GP 2012 | Round 4 standings

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Perell's picture

go Gelfand...

Morley's picture

Gelfand is in great form. Very nice technical victory today.

Spectator's picture

Gelfand played well, but the win can basically be attributed to a huge blunder by Wang Hao at the end

Morley's picture

True, but Gelfand did keep pressure up with excellent moves, after winning a pawn in the middle game. Wang Hao's error was the fruit of Gelfand's labor.

bronkenstein's picture

I would attribute it to superior preparation and loads of pressure that Gelfy was applying for a very long time - including , maybe, a missed victory (35.Nd2!?!). OFC it´s possible to reduce his effort to Wang´s blunder, and many did exactly that.

valg321's picture

Gelfand himself said it was a dead draw until that very blunder

bronkenstein's picture

And he was perfectly right about that.

sulutas's picture

If you guys can see it in replay, definitely watch the last moments between Gelfand-Hao, specifically when Hao reaches his hand to his king to move to h7, and pay attention to the mimics and gestures of Gelfand, who stared directly at Hao's face as if asking "are you serious fella?", and then Hao realized his blunder and made this suicide gesture, shooting at his own head with a smile on his face. I hope he immediately recovers from this loss, as he always looks to play interesting games.

RG13's picture

Gelfand has demonstrated repeatedly in his career that he can bring a very high level to select events.

Bartleby's picture

That's true. And Wang Hao brings a sense of humor. Who would be able to laugh off a blunder like this?

RG13's picture

Besides Wang Hao I've seen Topalov and Karpov laugh off tough losses. However Kasparov always took losses very badly.

MW's picture

If I recall correctly Kasparov once said "show me a good loser and I'll show you a loser". :-)

Joe Fiasco's picture

Great performance, Boris!

With such great results so far, what is he going to atone for on Yom Kippur? ;)

Chessguy's picture

Actually, Gelfand missed a not so complicated win with 52. Rc8+ Kh7, 53. Kf7 with similar mating motives as in the game. Black has to give up his pawns to avoid the mate. Comp evaluation is something like +5, btw. So dead draw is maybe the wrong assessment, at least after move 49.

cip's picture

you look at it and can think it is not so complicated... but consider first of all that Gelfand was probably not even looking for a win - I'm sure he was surprised at home analysis - I bet that in such a position his instinct told him the endgame is not winning...

cip's picture

you look at it and can think it is not so complicated... but consider first of all that Gelfand was probably not even looking for a win - I'm sure he was surprised at home analysis - I bet that in such a position his instinct told him the endgame is not winning...

Chessguy's picture

I beg to differ. If Ke5-f6 was not a winning attempt, then what else? A player of Gelfands strength always looks for a win and even if it would be not so easy to see for you and me OTB, Gelfand is quite capable to do these calculations in his dreams.

Spectator's picture

"Gelfand missed a not so complicated win with 52. Rc8+"

52. Rc8+ does not seem to win after .. Ra3 or .. Rb3 as the black rook can give checks along the seventh or eighth rank.

Chessguy's picture

But this simply loses the two pawns. I didn't check the TBs if the two passers on d and f win against King and rook, but there would be at least excellent practical winning chances. Better than in the actual game continuation.

Harish Srinivasan's picture

The official website with its per board camera and post HD video reports have been great. Kudos to Paulson for a great start to the wch cycle.

Ken H.'s picture

PD: I just want to say that this Web site will always be important because it is ahead of all the major sites for breaking news. I come here first for everything. If I want to know who won each round same day, this is where it's at. Everything else is gravy, and generous helpings of that are appreciated!

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