Reports | September 28, 2012 21:11

Exciting start in Poikovsky

Exciting start in Poikovsky

The Karpov Tournament in Poikovsky got off to a flying start on Friday with four fighting games and only one relatively short draw. Dmitry Jakovenko opened the score with a win against Viktor Bologan in a Queen's Indian while Nigel Short nicely Zugzwanged Sergei Rublevsky in a bishop ending. The last winner was Radoslaw Wojtaszek, who beat Alexander Motylev after 123 (!) moves.

Event 13th Karpov tournament | PGN via TWIC
Dates September 28-October 7, 2012
Location Poikovsky, Russia
System 10-player round robin
Players Ruslan Ponomariov, Dmitry Jakovenko, Radoslaw Wojtaszek, Lazaro Bruzon, Viktor Bologan, Nigel Short, Sergei Rublevsky, Wang Yue, Alexander Onischuk and Alexander Motylev

As we mentioned earlier this week, London and Sao Paulo are now joined by a third city where top chess is being played these days: Poikovsky, Russia. The event is full of players who are just below the absolute elite. Some of them are famous for working as seconds for top players, and together they make a nice playing field.

Besides a number of regular guests, the 13th edition of the Karpov tournament has three debutants: Nigel Short, Radek Wojtaszek and Wang Yue. These newcomers started well, and collected 2.5 points on the first day. Nigel Short seemed to be under a bit of pressure after the opening, but he treated the resulting bishop ending instructively, using the theme of Zugzwang more than once:

PGN string

Viktor Bologan was doing alright, in his game against Dmitry Jakovenko, until the first time control. He fell for a little trick and perhaps he should have just gone for the ending a bishop down.

PGN string

Ruslan Ponomariov is the top seed in Poikovsky this year. He faced Cuban Lazaro Bruzon, who was well prepared in a Taimanov Sicilian.

PGN string

The Schlechter System, a combination of a Slav pawn structure and a fianchetto of the king's bishop, has become quite a popular opening in recent years. Wang Yue played it in a way everyone can understand: exchange your queen's bishop, put your pawns on light squares and just play natural moves. Alexander Onischuk did manage to get some advantage, but with a positional exchange sac the Chinese created a fortress.

PGN string

Radek Wojtaszek, who won the silver medal for board one at the Olympiad, started with a win as well. He ground down Alexander Motylev in an ending with an extra pawn, where the presence of opposite coloured bishops made it hard to make progress.

PGN string

Karpov Tournament (Poikovsky) 2012 | Schedule & results

Round 1 28.09.12 11:00 CET   Round 2 29.09.12 11:00 CET
Short 1-0 Rublevsky   Rublevsky - Bruzon
Jakovenko 1-0 Bologan   Wojtaszek - Ponomariov
Onischuk ½-½ Wang Yue   Wang Yue - Motylev
Motylev 0-1 Wojtaszek   Bologan - Onischuk
Ponomariov ½-½ Bruzon   Short - Jakovenko
Round 3 30.09.12 11:00 CET   Round 4 01.10.12 11:00 CET
Jakovenko - Rublevsky   Rublevsky - Wojtaszek
Onischuk - Short   Wang Yue - Bruzon
Motylev - Bologan   Bologan - Ponomariov
Ponomariov - Wang Yue   Short - Motylev
Bruzon - Wojtaszek   Jakovenko - Onischuk
Round 5 02.10.12 11:00 CET   Round 6 04.10.12 11:00 CET
Onischuk - Rublevsky   Rublevsky - Wang Yue
Motylev - Jakovenko   Bologan - Wojtaszek
Ponomariov - Short   Short - Bruzon
Bruzon - Bologan   Jakovenko - Ponomariov
Wojtaszek - Wang Yue   Onischuk - Motylev
Round 7 05.10.12 11:00 CET   Round 8 06.10.12 11:00 CET
Motylev - Rublevsky   Rublevsky - Bologan
Ponomariov - Onischuk   Short - Wang Yue
Bruzon - Jakovenko   Jakovenko - Wojtaszek
Wojtaszek - Short   Onischuk - Bruzon
Wang Yue - Bologan   Motylev - Ponomariov
Round 9 07.10.12 11:00 CET        
Ponomariov - Rublevsky        
Bruzon - Motylev        
Wojtaszek - Onischuk        
Wang Yue - Jakovenko        
Bologan - Short        

 

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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

chesshire cat's picture

Nice report Peter.
Surprised that Short does not know that opening better - I remember him getting into trouble with it v Moro and thought he might have learned from that!

strana's picture

Radek is a monster..... totally underrated.

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