Reports | September 28, 2012 21:44

Gelfand maintains lead in London with win over Adams, Mamedyarov beats Nakamura

Boris Gelfand moved to "plus three" at the FIDE Grand Prix in London by beating Mickey Adams in Friday's round 7. The Israeli grandmaster is now half a point ahead of just one player, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, who inflicted the second consecutive loss upon top seed Hikaru Nakamura. In other news, the draw between Vassily Ivanchuk and Rustam Kasimdzhanov lasted only 11 moves.

Boris Gelfand, still on top | Photo © Ray Morris-Hill

Event Grand Prix | PGN via TWIC
Dates September 20-October 4, 2012
Location London, UK
System 12-player round robin
Players Hikaru Nakamura, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter Svidler, Wang Hao, Boris Gelfand, Peter Leko, Shakriyar Mamedyarov, Leinier Dominguez Perez, Anish Giri, Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Rate of play

120 minutes for the Ô¨Årst 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then each player will be allotted 15 minutes after the second time control and an increment of 30 seconds per move will be allowed from move 61 onwards

Extra Players will not be allowed to offer draws directly to their opponents; players will continue to play if the arbiter does not authorise the draw

It's a bit of a challenge to explain what happened at the start of the seventh round in London: at move nine Vassily Ivanchuk and Rustam Kasimdzhanov started repeating the moves, and at move eleven, before they were officially allowed to do so, they agreed to a draw.

PGN string

Kasimdzhanov was interviewed afterwards and he made clear that he was surprised that his opponent started repeating. He felt that the White player also has a little more responsibility to create something. Finally, Kasim referred to his open letter from last year in which he argued that draws should be abolished altogether.

Videos by Macauley Peterson

Boris Gelfand is still relying heavily on his hard work he did for his world title match, and why not. Like Vishy Anand, Mickey Adams avoided Gelfand's Sveshnikov with 3.Bb5 and then deviated from one of his own games at move 13. At some point the Englishman, who substituted for Peter Svidler for this first Grand Prix, sacrificed a pawn. Gelfand responded accurately and then profited from a big mistake by his opponent just before the time control.

PGN string

After round 6 half a point behind Gelfand were Alexander Grischuk, Peter Leko, Veselin Topalov and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov. Only the latter managed to win his game, but quite convincingly. The Azerbaijani pushed Hikaru Nakamura to last place in the leaderboard.

PGN string

Anish Giri again got a Sicilian on the board, but this time with White and starting from 1.Nf3! Alexander Grischuk played the Kan wih Bf8-c5-a7 and an early ...b6 made his bishop on a7 look a bit weird. It turned out to be useful because Giri decided to play on the queenside.

PGN string

Veselin Topalov played another very inspired and creative game, with Black against Wang Hao. Sacrificing two pawns in the opening, winning one back and then giving up one more, the Bulgarian held the initiative throughout the game but it was just not enough to win because of very accurate play by the Chinese.

PGN string

Leinier Dominguez tried 4.d3 against Peter Leko's Berlin. It became a bit of a theoretical duel and the Hungarian got a chance to show a more or less forced draw.

PGN string

So Gelfand is still half a point ahead. He'll face Giri, Grischuk, Leko and then Kasimdzhanov in the remaining rounds. Runner-up Mamedyarov plays Topalov, Dominguez, Wang Hao and then Leko.

Schedule & pairings

Round 1 15:00 CET 21.09.12   Round 2 15:00 CET 22.09.12
Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Leko   Leko 1-0 Ivanchuk
Nakamura 0-1 Gelfand   Adams ½-½ Mamedyarov
Topalov ½-½ Grischuk   Giri ½-½ Wang Hao
Dominguez ½-½ Giri   Grischuk ½-½ Dominguez
Wang Hao ½-½ Adams   Gelfand ½-½ Topalov
Mamedyarov ½-½ Ivanchuk   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Nakamura
Round 3 15:00 CET 23.09.12   Round 4 15:00 CET 24.09.12
Nakamura ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Adams
Topalov ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Giri ½-½ Ivanchuk
Dominguez ½-½ Gelfand   Grischuk 1-0 Mamedyarov
Wang Hao ½-½ Grischuk   Gelfand 1-0 Wang Hao
Mamedyarov 1-0 Giri   Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Dominguez
Ivanchuk ½-½ Adams   Nakamura ½-½ Topalov
Round 5 15:00 CET 25.09.12   Round 6 15:00 CET 27.09.12
Topalov ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Giri
Dominguez ½-½ Nakamura   Grischuk ½-½ Adams
Wang Hao ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Gelfand ½-½ Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov ½-½ Gelfand   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk ½-½ Grischuk   Nakamura 0-1 Wang Hao
Adams ½-½ Giri   Topalov 1-0 Dominguez
Round 7 15:00 CET 28.09.12   Round 8 15:00 CET 29.09.12
Dominguez ½-½ Leko   Leko - Grischuk
Wang Hao ½-½ Topalov   Gelfand - Giri
Mamedyarov 1-0 Nakamura   Kasimdzhanov - Adams
Ivanchuk ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Nakamura - Ivanchuk
Adams 0-1 Gelfand   Topalov - Mamedyarov
Giri ½-½ Grischuk   Dominguez - Wang Hao
Round 9 15:00 CET 01.10.12   Round 10 15:00 CET 02.10.12
Wang Hao - Leko   Leko - Gelfand
Mamedyarov - Dominguez   Kasimdzhanov - Grischuk
Ivanchuk - Topalov   Nakamura - Giri
Adams - Nakamura   Topalov - Adams
Giri - Kasimdzhanov   Dominguez - Ivanchuk
Grischuk - Gelfand   Wang Hao - Mamedyarov
Round 11 12:00 CET 03.10.12        
Mamedyarov - Leko        
Ivanchuk - Wang Hao        
Adams - Dominguez        
Giri - Topalov        
Grischuk - Nakamura        
Gelfand - Kasimdzhanov        

London GP 2012 | Round 7 standings

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

mig's picture

Well done gelfy. Show them why you were and are a worthy WCh contender.

Chris's picture

Looking at Ananad current play... :(

hansie's picture

Now the Top Seed is at the Bottom!

Anonymous's picture

Just a few words about the Elo vs ´perform when it matters´...

Spectator's picture

That's got to be the shortest grandmaster draw by repetition in the last decade!

Thomas's picture

Probably so - Bacrot lost his records (14 moves) from the previous GP series:
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1529403
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1528295
But these repetitions - twice in the same event - weren't exactly forced, just a way to bypass Sofia rules.

Carlos Cleto's picture

As I said before (during Anand x Gelfand match) : Gelfand seems to have a "boost-propeller" in classifying events of World Championship...

Chris's picture

Gelfand has not made any blunder in the tournament.
That is all.

AljechinsCat's picture

.. besides that he pressed his opponents to blunder. (What an ignorant comment.)

Anonymous's picture

Great to see HN playing aggressive variations trying to win with Black.

RealityCheck's picture

Top Seed ....... Bottom Fish!

Nakamura ...bad Sushi. Sorry, but since his fling with Krapsparov he's gotten rotten, worse.

Hanging out with the wrong crowd man......sad.

It is no wonder he thought the 2012 Wch Match Anand vs Gelfand was boring; he knows nothing about CHESS.

Niima's picture

Why put someone (anyone) down when they are not at their best, especially when their level is way above yours?

RealityCheck's picture

@Niima You shd ask H-Bomb that question. See what he says about putting folks down.

Thomas's picture

After round 1 (Gelfand had beaten Nakamura, or Nakamura lost against Gelfand) our resident Gelfand hater redivivo wrote:
"The simple truth is that all the top players see a draw against Gelfand as such a failure that they do everything they can to avoid it."
Can we now conclude that Nakamura, Wang Hao and Adams are top players, while Gelfand's other opponents aren't (including - this time - Ivanchuk who accepted a move repetition in an unclear position with little time on the clock)?

[redivivo]: "I don't think he [Gelfand] will finish anywhere close to the top this time either."
Anything can still happen in the last four rounds: If Gelfand loses all of his remaining games he'll finish with -1 (still better than some "expert predictions"!?). If Nakamura finishes with 4/4 he may still win the tournament.
But if the situation remains unchanged, then what is wrong with the format of the London GP? After Kazan, the format was blamed for allowing Gelfand to finish ahead of higher-rated players ... .

Anonymous's picture

The format is very good, and so is the excellent new presentation, video live stream and (ChessVibes) coverage - regardless of who might win the first GP tournament in the end. Gelfand is having a great tournament so far and he's of course among the strongest players at his good days while Nakamura is currently dramatically underperforming with really bad form. Life goes on.

sen's picture

I think nakamura is underperforming becos as he is ranked world no 5 and one of current top player,so he thinks it is not good to draw with below rating players like gelfand so he choosen to lose rather than draw the matches.no wonder why nakamura felt last wc championship is boring one and not between two strongest player.well done my bigbouthie!!!,i hope naka continue good performance with his bigmouth.

Thomas's picture

I wouldn't say that Nakamura is dramatically underperforming, in the sense that his result is unusual let alone unprecedented. There was Dortmund 2011 (4.5/10 in the end, but it was 2.5/8 before his final wins against underdog Meier and against Kramnik who had already secured clear first place). There was Tal Memorial 2011 (3/9).

People, at least his fans, tend to forget such results while they do remember the single event (Wijk aan Zee 2011) where he "dramatically overperformed". This is still his sole supertournament victory (I don't count US Championships where anything but first, or second behind Kamsky, would be a disappointing result). One more than Anand and Gelfand who both had their successes in important matches ... .

Guided By Voices's picture

Agressive? He was playing inside his last 3 ranks for most of the game, building up a museum of amateurish weaknesses... This bad mannered guy is a far cry of a great chess player...

columbo's picture

it's the damnation of the twitt !

Chris's picture

In dynamic positions you cannot speak about static weaknesses

Excalibur's picture

Naka's real rating is like 2730+

Chris's picture

Are you an expert??

Aditya's picture

Mamedyarov had such an awesome structure built up today!! All pieces in ideal conditions. The game will be very instructional in the dos and donts of opening/middlegame theory. Apart from Gelfand, even this guy has performed pretty well. Three wins for him too (Although a loss has kept him behind).

strana's picture

Gelfand´d performance remembers me how strong Karpov was. The israeli GM had already beaten Kramnik and Adams before in a match but could not handle a 44 year old Karpov in 95 ( Tolya won 6,5 - 3,5 ) . Sad that there are no players nowdays that could be compared to Anatoly and Kasparov.

Harry_Flashman's picture

Don't be so pessimistic.. Carlsen , Aronian and very likely Caruana are players of the same class, if not strenght. It's amazing that not a single "super " russian player has been produced in the last years .. They had to " import " Karjakin from Ukraine to get a strong young guy...

S3's picture

Sorry but those guys have nothing on Karpov, let alone Kasparov.

S3's picture

And while the Russians haven't got a new "K" they have plenty of players who are able to win the wch. Just think of a Grischuk or perhaps even Svidler who also qualified for the wch candidates tournament.

Harry_Flashman's picture

"Plenty " Of players ? Who ? You named one , Grishuk , an outstanding GM but not really World champion stuff. Who else young and stong do the russian have ? Still waiting for some names..

Thomas's picture

Not yet WCh material but maybe with potential for further improvement: Andreikin and Nepomniachtchi. Or for even younger players: Sjugirov (*1993) and Dubov (*1996).

strana's picture

The answer is simple: Nepomniachtchi ( 2-0 against Carlsen, do not forget) and reigning national champion Andreikin . Nepo just need to be more consistent and not play all his games in less than 30min. Andreikin is totally underrated, he has currently a 2750 + strenght., despite a not good opening knowledge. In a near future, add 16 year old Daniil Dubov and Urii Eliseev.

Harry_Flashman's picture

Nepo is - 130 point from Carlsen and hasn't won any major tournament yet.. And is - 70 points from Caruana.. Still it does seem that the best young players are in the West these days..

S3's picture

Nepo won the Russian championship and that is clearly a major tournament. He hasn't played a lot of events outside Russia anyway. Also, a Grischuk could very well win the wch. There are some other players who could go far, but it seems they either don't work hard enough or are too unstable (Moro f.e.) But things might change. The next wch might very well be a Russian ((tho I still bet on Aronian).

sen's picture

I don't understand how do u put carlsen, aronian and very like carunana in karpov or kasparov bracket.These players haven't even won candidates match not even word championship challenger.Just wining tournament doesn't put these players in all time great players.Let them prove by wining candidates and WC and defend it for years then we can think about putting them in all time great.

valg321's picture

although a fan of the young guns, i have to agree. History remembers the world champions

Harry_Flashman's picture

I have put Carlsen and Caruana because they are 20 years old and so strong.. And with wide margins of improvment.

strana's picture

I do not agree, Harry. First, Carsen is almost 22, not 20.
The fact is that nowadays many players ( not all of them, ok ) have a strong tendency to reach their potential at a very young age.I think Caruana is still improving but Is Carsen a stronger player today than 2 years ago?? If so, just by a little. The same can not be said in Karpov´s and Kasparov´s time, both of them reaching theirs peaks at around 30. In my opinion, Karpov´s victory ( tied with the late Leonid Stein ) in the extremely strong Alekhine Memorial 1971 , remains the most convincing ever by a 20 year old.

valg321's picture

what about Gelfand? is he improving or not in his age?

Harry_Flashman's picture

Yep.. But still in the 21... KAsparov became World Champion at 22 and Karpov at 24.. Carlsen is still very much in time Strana.. :-)

Anonymous's picture

Nak decided it was time to turn the beat around and risked everything for a win. The KID game has this characteristic of "do or die". Incredible.

valg321's picture

be that as it may, he's getting creamed

AljechinsCat's picture

Also my point of view, an extremely risky and brave decision. Especially to go for the -Sd7,-e5 lines against the Fianchetto. But this is just a general comment, perhaps Mamedyarov was better prepared. Especially after -c5 it became strategic advantage vs. tactics .. and Shak can also calculate a a bit !

Bartleby's picture

I like the game Adams-Gelfand. Complex play. Hard to pinpoint where White went wrong.

Hugh Jass's picture

Naka if after 7 rds you look around the room and dont know who the rabbit is,......it'e YOU.
Its so satisfying to see the mouthy so called american fail in top class events again while over in Sau Paulo Tootsy is 3 wins from 4.......maybe perhaps maybe YOU are overated Naka.......as said before you are a top 20 player at best, face it and go back to playing 1/0 chess and flagging.

choufleur's picture

Naka 2800 + by the end of the year ?

AljechinsCat's picture

Sometimes I feel more reminded of Wrestling here. Reading some comments I wonder if those writers do play chess on a decent level. In tournament practice, I realized such disrespect only in lower classes.

Zeblakob's picture

The geniality of Gelfand is: he is a mature player and can smoothly readjust his strength depending
on the importance and priority of the events. Play by need !

redivivo's picture

As people keep saying at Chessbomb, Gelfand is the only player that wins every time he wants to win, he just doesn't care about ratings, if he did he would be 2900 :-)

S3's picture

I think it's more along the line of saving energy and your best for when it matters. Especially when you get older that becomes very important, at least that is what old guys always say. Gelfy is not as bad as many people seem to think. Winning the GP and candidates and drawing the wch in succession was not a fluke.
Same goes for Anand. He has got nothing to prove but to defend his title. Draws or mediocre tournament performances might bother the fans but not him. Perhaps it's even inevitable at that age. But somehow they still managed to win stuff of which the Caruana's and Carlsens can only dream of for now.

Thomas's picture

I don't think Gelfand "picks" events where he wants to play well and cares less about other events - for one thing this would be disrespectful to organizers who invite him. It might rather be related to his style and approach to chess: always striving for the very best move, hence often getting into time trouble (he is nicknamed "professor" for several reasons, his looks being just part of it). That's energy-draining and doesn't work out well in every event. When it rains it pours upon him, when the sun shines for him his opponents feel the heat ... . And just like one cannot choose the weather by simply pushing a button, Gelfand cannot choose his form for any given event.

sen's picture

absolutely correct. anand,gelfand,kramink aged players should selective choose tournament to excel.unlike young players like carlsen,aronian and others are very young have lot of energy with them but not channelized properly.otherwise carlsen would have participated last wc cycle and aronian should have won last candidate match and played wc match again anand. As a chess fan my priority interest lies with
1)who is world champion and how he defends it
2) who is WC challenger
3) world cup and grand pix
4) super gm tournaments
5) player who wins lot in general

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