Reports | October 02, 2012 20:45

Nakamura beats Giri in 10th round London Grand Prix

Nakamura beats Giri in 10th round London Grand Prix

Hikaru Nakamura's losing streak came to an end on Tuesday at the FIDE Grand Prix in London. The American grandmaster beat Anish Giri in 65 moves with a breakthrough combination. As all the other games were drawn, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov still leads with one round to go. The final round will start tomorrow at 12:00 (noon) local time (13:00 CET) so two hours earlier.

Nakamura beats Giri in a Petroff | Photo © ChessVibes

Event 1st Grand Prix | PGN via TWIC
Dates September 20-October 4, 2012
Location London, UK
System 12-player round robin
Players Hikaru Nakamura, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter Svidler, Wang Hao, Boris Gelfand, Peter Leko, Shakriyar Mamedyarov, Leinier Dominguez Perez, Anish Giri, Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Rate of play

120 minutes for the Ô¨Årst 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then each player will be allotted 15 minutes after the second time control and an increment of 30 seconds per move will be allowed from move 61 onwards

Extra Players will not be allowed to offer draws directly to their opponents; players will continue to play if the arbiter does not authorise the draw

Quite a few famous chess players attended the 10th round of the Grand Prix on Tuesday. Ray Keene, Danny King, Stuart Conquest and Jon Speelman have been visiting the event on a regular basis, and the latter spent most of his 56th birthday like any other round in Simpson's. Luke McShane, Julian Hodgson, Lawrence Trent and Dominic Lawson came by as well, but before most of these people arrived, the new tournament leader had already drawn his game.

Half a point ahead of the pack, and playing Black in the penultimate round, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov could hardly be blamed. His opponent, Wang Hao, has shown himself to be a very creative player, already in the opening phase, and this time it was no different. In the 4...Bf5 Caro-Kann the Chinese went for the slightly extravagant 5.Nc5!? – tried by none other than Bobby Fischer –  but Mamedyarov was hardly surprised as he could remember a game Khairullin-Dreev, and decided to follow it.

PGN string

Leinier Dominguez and Vassily Ivanchuk played a very equal game. The Ukrainian still has a very wide opening repertoire, and this time he chose an old line of the Ruy Lopez. (Isn't it great when you can play just anything, and pick whatever suits your mood?) 

PGN string

In today's videos you'll see the players signing tournament posters. We're not exactly sure how many the organizers asked them to sign, but it seemed to be about a hundred!

Kasimdzanov and Grischuk played, according to the latter, a very bad game. Black was winning after the opening, then spoilt it, then mistakenly avoided a perpetual and then held a slightly worse rook ending to a draw.

PGN string

Yesterday Grischuk said that it's always a challenge to fight against World Championship preparation. Playing Gelfand, Leko decided to return to a line he played several times ten years ago, and did manage to get a slight edge. However, it cost him time on the clock and after an inaccuracy on move 33 the position was equal.

PGN string

Topalov and Adams also drew their game, but in this case it was quite clear that White was better all the time. The Bulgarian was a bit disappointed that he didn't manage to do more with that nice ending he got, but part of that disappointment was no doubt connected to the standings.

PGN string

Yet again Nakamura was the last to finish, but this time things went very well for him. Against Giri's Petroff he decided to swap queens at an early stage, and he got a slight edge. The ending should have been a draw, but one inaccurate move by Giri was enough for Nakamura to strike with a tactical breakthrough.

PGN string

Schedule & pairings

Round 1 15:00 CET 21.09.12   Round 2 15:00 CET 22.09.12
Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Leko   Leko 1-0 Ivanchuk
Nakamura 0-1 Gelfand   Adams ½-½ Mamedyarov
Topalov ½-½ Grischuk   Giri ½-½ Wang Hao
Dominguez ½-½ Giri   Grischuk ½-½ Dominguez
Wang Hao ½-½ Adams   Gelfand ½-½ Topalov
Mamedyarov ½-½ Ivanchuk   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Nakamura
Round 3 15:00 CET 23.09.12   Round 4 15:00 CET 24.09.12
Nakamura ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Adams
Topalov ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Giri ½-½ Ivanchuk
Dominguez ½-½ Gelfand   Grischuk 1-0 Mamedyarov
Wang Hao ½-½ Grischuk   Gelfand 1-0 Wang Hao
Mamedyarov 1-0 Giri   Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Dominguez
Ivanchuk ½-½ Adams   Nakamura ½-½ Topalov
Round 5 15:00 CET 25.09.12   Round 6 15:00 CET 27.09.12
Topalov ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Giri
Dominguez ½-½ Nakamura   Grischuk ½-½ Adams
Wang Hao ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Gelfand ½-½ Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov ½-½ Gelfand   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk ½-½ Grischuk   Nakamura 0-1 Wang Hao
Adams ½-½ Giri   Topalov 1-0 Dominguez
Round 7 15:00 CET 28.09.12   Round 8 15:00 CET 29.09.12
Dominguez ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Grischuk
Wang Hao ½-½ Topalov   Gelfand ½-½ Giri
Mamedyarov 1-0 Nakamura   Kasimdzhanov 1-0 Adams
Ivanchuk ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Nakamura 0-1 Ivanchuk
Adams 0-1 Gelfand   Topalov ½-½ Mamedyarov
Giri ½-½ Grischuk   Dominguez ½-½ Wang Hao
Round 9 15:00 CET 01.10.12   Round 10 15:00 CET 02.10.12
Wang Hao ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Gelfand
Mamedyarov 1-0 Dominguez   Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Grischuk
Ivanchuk 0-1 Topalov   Nakamura 1-0 Giri
Adams 1-0 Nakamura   Topalov ½-½ Adams
Giri ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Dominguez ½-½ Ivanchuk
Grischuk 1-0 Gelfand   Wang Hao ½-½ Mamedyarov
Round 11 13:00 CET 03.10.12        
Mamedyarov - Leko        
Ivanchuk - Wang Hao        
Adams - Dominguez        
Giri - Topalov        
Grischuk - Nakamura        
Gelfand - Kasimdzhanov        

London GP 2012 | Round 10 standings

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

hansie's picture

Big Mouth still lying rock-bottom.

Anonymous's picture

Little Nothing on the earth that you are still spouting off.

hansie's picture

Ha ha ha ha!

Anonymous's picture

But's it true HN's comments on Gary K last year were absurd.

zuipschuit's picture

Bigmouth oh bigmouth lalalala bigmouth strikes again!

arkan's picture

Where xx = 65

Thomas's picture

So does Giri keep his record of five consecutive losses (Wijk aan Zee this year), or has anyone - at least from the current world top - ever done "better" than that?

zuipschuit's picture

hahaha you are so funny it hurts

noyb's picture

Congrats to Hikaru, up off the floor and fighting again. Hope this is his wake-up call that in order to reach his stated goal for the past two years of 2800, he's going to have to solidify his approach. Current plan "ain't workin'"!

Anonymous's picture

Yeah, I think he needs a more solid approach - maybe more positional than the 'catch as catch can' style he seems to be fond of. If he was travelling with a coach he would have advised him on the old Soviet method (always practiced by Kramnik and Kasparov) of playing for a draw after a loss REGARDLESS of the score. That will usually keep a single loss from turning into a streak.

zuipschuit's picture

Petrosian lives!

Anonymous's picture

Excellent point.

Chris's picture

Nakas talent is of other sort. It is if you made Tal to play like Petrosian. It will not work. Ex. game vs Ivanchuk solid approach.

Naka shall follow his own style. I think problem is physical condition. Playing all games for a win, longest in tournament needs power.

NN's picture

Nakamura found a beautiful combination in a seemingly simple endgame today. Impressive comeback.

choufleur's picture

Naka 2800+ by the end of the year ?

Anonymous's picture

NO!

Anonymous's picture

NAKAMURA!!!! He's the Greatest Chessplayer to bring back American Chess, just like Bobby!! He was on ICC and blitzed against Rybka and even got this cool mate like 5 bishops and they were all huddled around the king stuck in a corner and it was like 200 moves in a minute. Wierd. No one could do that in the whole world. USA!! USA!! USA!! (Watch out Carlsen, here he comes!)

RG13's picture

Yes he is famous as a 1 minute sudden death player by flagging his opponents with the 'pre-move' technique. An engine does best with at least 3 minutes and NEEDS a 2 or 3 second increment (because for each move it has to take at least a second to rule out nonsense moves). Let him play an engine like Houdini at 3 min with a 2 sec increment and he will know what blitz is.

Anonymous's picture

13 as in 13 years old?

Chris's picture

He is last in the tournament still.
game Grischuk - Nakamura result is open as Grischuk needs win.So everything could happen.
Naka has chances for a win.

Adolf's picture

Today I heard lots of patzery funny comments, but nothing like Chessbomb (you can actually read them, they remain there in the game as they were made live). They said 47.g5!! was losing, as Houdini put it in purple (later it changed its mind of course). They said 52…Kxd7 was a blunder and 52…Kxf7 would have hold. (When they both lose but Houdini´s analysis didn’t show that). They later said 56.Bh6, g4 57.Bg5 was a blunder, because Houdini put that in red initially and later changed its mind and corrected it to blue (red= blunder and blue=correct move in chessbomb).
Now I see some Annonymus patzer saying that Naka beat Rybka with lots of Bishops once and making 200 moves in a minute, while I assume he meant this game http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbAzeDxxGuQ which was a 3 min regular blitz game and the video is displayed in accelerated speed and of course, he promoted an army of knights, not Bishops.
And they also say that you should play for a draw after losing (some supposed soviet adage): well, thanks god we have Naka on the board and not Leko, Gelfand, Anand, Kramnik, Karjakin and most anyone who would have taken a draw today after 25 moves, with their self confidence shattered as Naka must have been today.
Big kudos for him from another fan; today he graduated (he shares this with Magnus) as the ultimate board fighter, crushing the chicken Petrov and showing that chess is far from dead.

Thomas's picture

Lots of funny statements in a single comment ... . These Houdini analyses are at low search depth, hence often far too shallow to be meaningful.

Nakamura obviously wanted, or at least didn't mind a draw today - which other reason is there for the tame 5.Qe2 ? (BTW the other great fighter MC recently played the equally tame 5.d3 Nf6 6.d4 d5 transposing to an exchange French). With Sofia rules in place he couldn't "take" (i.e. offer or accept) a draw after 25 or 40 or 60 or 120 moves, unless the position is dead drawn or players find a repetition. So he had to play on, of course no risk involved but objectively only faint winning chances.

The combination is nice but - once you see the idea - not too hard to calculate because the next few moves are completely forced. It is only possible if black puts his bishop on e5, hence it was a sudden accidental opportunity, and for sure it has nothing to do with the opening.

Anonymous's picture

I watched the vid. That is not chess - it is taking advantage of a computer which has a bug. In a completely blocked position Rybka wasted it's time trying to find moves that will avoid a 3 fold repetition. In a sudden death time control Naka simply killed it with the pre-move option. Please link me to the video where a human beats Houdini with a time control of at least 3 minutes and at least a 2 second increment. That is what an engine needs to play CHESS.

Zeblakob's picture

@Adolf, listen to Thomas and learn.

eric's picture

As I commented yesterday, he is back in the top-live-10 again! So, I will repeat, Nakamura is a great player and you will not be able to get rid of in 15 days of a tournament!

Chris's picture

He has been all time in top 10. Rating (live) is not deciding. Rating meaninig is overestimated. at all

Chris's picture

He has been all time in top 10. Rating (live) is not deciding. Rating meaninig is overestimated. at all

Aditya's picture

Very nice combination by Nakamura today, it should do good to his morale. The analysis after Be5 (fortress or not) is surely going to the books. As a whole, it's nice to see the tournament bring back Mamedyarov and Topalov, two players who had dwindled in the last year and a half. They both have a nice style of play and I hope they keep up this form.

Jambow's picture

Yes Giri was finished earlier in the year his fledgling carear wrapped up in his teens after dropping below 2700, Carlsen was through last year after ayeilding the number one position to Anand for a few days after a bad olympiad and now Nakamura after maintaining a top ten position for well over a year must also retire from chess.

chesshire cat's picture

"Nakamura obviously wanted, or at least didn't mind a draw today - which other reason is there for the tame 5.Qe2 ? (BTW the other great fighter MC recently played the equally tame 5.d3 Nf6 6.d4 d5 transposing to an exchange French)". You contradict yourself there. Carlsen - as you say a fighter - played a theoretically tame line to try to outplay his opponent and avoid prepared lines, i.e. to try to win, no thought of a draw. Nakamura may well have had the same idea, especially since he has been playing less heavy theory this tournament.. Spassky also used to play Qe2. It doesn't necessarily mean one is playing for a draw.

Thomas's picture

"It doesn't necessarily mean one is playing for a draw."
Yep, not necessarily - maybe my words were too strong even if I won't retract "didn't mind a draw". But my overall impression is that Nakamura tried to follow the "Soviet recipe" - not after the first, but after a second consecutive loss.
Round by round:
Round 1 - a loss against Gelfand
Round 2 - a KID against Kasimdzhanov (and that's "heavy theory"). With a bit of luck, it worked against the Elo tailender (who otherwise plays a decent tournament by his standards).
Rounds 3-5: three draws in opening sidelines
Round 6: a loss against Wang Hao
Round 7: another KID against Mamedyarov, this time he got 'crushed'
And now ....
Round 8: Ruy Lopez exchange against Ivanchuk (safety first? but he messed up in the endgame)
Round 9: Caro-Kann against Adams (anticipating that Adams wouldn't go for the topical 3.e5 ? The 1.e4 brother of the KID would have been a Sicilian, part of Nakamura's repertoire)
Round 10: early queen exchange against Giri.

Only Nakamura himself could shed light on this, but he may not admit that he was playing for draws, or at least trying to avoid risks and more losses.

Chris's picture

It is the other side. Nakamura tried to play in not own solid style and result is poor.

RealityCheck's picture

Nakamura said so himself that he was "playing for a draw w/ white", nothing more.
This false image of HN and MC going all out for a win every time they put the gloves on is pure propaganda. No truth in it at all. Stop the hype.

RealityCheck's picture

Nakamura said so himself that he was "playing for a draw w/ white", nothing more.
This false image of HN and MC going all out for a win every time they put the gloves on is pure propaganda. No truth in it at all. Stop the hype.

redivivo's picture

Yeah, no truth in it at all, it's pure propaganda that they play more fighting chess than Anand.

Thomas's picture

Another observation on Nakamura's endgames: He played poorly (by super-GM standards) in strategic endgames (Gelfand, Ivanchuk) but well when tactics played a role (Kasimdzhanov, Giri). The game against Leko is a mixed bag: he outplayed the opponent strategically (which is quite something against Leko) but failed to convert when it was a matter of technique and "simple endgame theory".

These and earlier examples might be enough to define a pattern: Nakamura has strengths, but he surely also has weaknesses - which aren't just a matter of good or bad form in any given event.

Longyearbyen's picture

Good news for humans!

Nakamuras 47.g5 which is absolutely winning was not found by Houdini(depth 30) nor Rybka. Only Stockfish found this move and that within seconds. Stockfish really is must for complementary analysis to houdini.

RG13's picture

You are correct. Part of Houdini's strength is it's pruning - and some lines it doesn't bother to consider. This makes it a favorite to win a match against any other engine but it will still drop some games in a long enough match (like 40 games). Also, it seems to hog more system resources than Stockfish.

chill's picture

in London, there is a phrase associated with game of cricket. Form is temporary but class is permanent. Sounds apt for Nakamura

trollaras's picture

Superb play by Naka. Naka to some extent is like Ivanchuk, genious, original thinking but not stable tournament play.

chesshire cat's picture

Oh, if he said it, then fair enough. But in itself Qe2 might just mean a struggle for a tiny advantage or an effort to avoid well-explored Petroff theory.
He's certainly going for a win today though!

redivivo's picture

"Oh, if he said it, then fair enough"

He of course didn't say it, and the conclusion that he "obviously wanted a draw" is just wrong. He naturally wanted to win and did so. Afterwards he said: "Had Black played 22...Rd4, Nakamura said he would have played for a draw", but that's an entirely different question. Going for the endgame against Giri is maybe a promising way to play against him, in the last round Topalov won an equal endgame just by displaying much better endgame technique.

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