Reports | July 05, 2013 13:36

Karjakin on 2/2 in Beijing

Sergey Karjakin is the sole leader after two round at the FIDE Grand Prix in Beijing, China. The 23 year old Russian grandmaster also won his second game on Friday with white in a Pirc (Austrian Attack) against Wang Hao. The other five games ended in draws.

Photos by Anastasiya Karlovic courtesy of FIDE

The second round in Beijing was a much more quiet affair compared to the first. There was only one decisive game, and none of the five draws was overly exciting. Sergey Karjakin took an early lead in the tournament with his second win, against Wang Hao. The game looked like a complete crush, and maybe it was, but there were some hidden tactics for the defending side. It does look like Karjakin has made clear that this quite old variation of the Pirc is definitely slightly better for White. (In fact it was also discussed in issue 233 of our magazine ChessVibes Openings!)

PGN string

Alexander Grischuk versus Vassily Ivanchuk, a Kan Sicilian, was a classic fight of bishop pair against structure. Black's knights found good squares, and even the king could join the defence of the e-pawn. White's pawn sac didn't give much extra play and in the end the players found a funny move repetition.

PGN string

It's quite amazing how Gata Kamsky manages to score so well with such a narrow repertoire with Black. In his favourite Chebanenko Slav/4.e3 Grünfeld/Schlechter hybrid he equalized quickly against Shakhriyar Mamedyarov; the American used less than an hour on the clock!

PGN string

Veselin Topalov and Peter Leko repeated a line in the Queen's Indian which they also played at the Sberbank Rapid tournament in Kiev last month. Back then White got nothing, and this time it wasn't any different. The Hungarian's repertoire is still as solid as a rock.

PGN string

About Wang Yue-Boris Gelfand, we wanted to write that "Gelfand is still profiting from the work he has done on his Grünfeld repertoire", as he used this as his main (surprise) weapon in his match against Vishy Anand last year. However, we then discovered that he had already played 7...Ne4 against the Fianchetto back in 1995 against Anatoly Karpov! It was also the line in which Hikaru Nakamura beat Vladimir Kramnik last year at the Olympiad. Gelfand's setup of leaving the e-pawn on e7 worked well in the game.

PGN string

Anish Giri also used 1.e4 in his second White game and faced Alexander Morozevich's favourite defence, the French. Both sides developed their pieces on normal squares, some pawns and pieces were traded and then the moves were repeated. That was about it!

PGN string

 

Grand Prix Beijing 2013 | Pairings & results

Round 1 09:00 CET 04.07.13   Round 2 09:00 CET 05.07.13
Giri 0-1 Karjakin   Karjakin 1-0 Wang Hao
Morozevich ½-½ Wang Yue   Grischuk ½-½ Ivanchuk
Gelfand 0-1 Topalov   Mamedyarov ½-½ Kamsky
Leko ½-½ Mamedyarov   Topalov ½-½ Leko
Kamsky 0-1 Grischuk   Wang Yue ½-½ Gelfand
Ivanchuk ½-½ Wang Hao   Giri ½-½ Morozevich
Round 3 09:00 CET 06.07.13   Round 4 09:00 CET 07.07.13
Morozevich - Karjakin   Karjakin - Grischuk
Gelfand - Giri   Mamedyarov - Wang Hao
Leko - Wang Yue   Topalov - Ivanchuk
Kamsky - Topalov   Wang Yue - Kamsky
Ivanchuk  - Mamedyarov   Giri - Leko
Wang Hao - Grischuk   Morozevich - Gelfand
Round 5 09:00 CET 09.07.13   Round 6 09:00 CET 10.07.13
Gelfand - Karjakin   Karjakin - Mamedyarov
Leko - Morozevich   Topalov - Grischuk
Kamsky - Giri   Wang Yue - Wang Hao
Ivanchuk - Wang Yue   Giri - Ivanchuk
Wang Hao - Topalov   Morozevich - Kamsky
Grischuk - Mamedyarov   Gelfand - Leko
Round 7 09:00 CET 11.07.13   Round 8 09:00 CET 12.07.13
Leko - Karjakin   Karjakin - Topalov
Kamsky - Gelfand   Wang Yue - Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk - Morozevich   Giri - Grischuk
Wang Hao - Giri   Morozevich - Wang Hao
Grischuk - Wang Yue   Gelfand - Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov - Topalov   Leko - Kamsky
Round 9 09:00 CET 14.07.13   Round 10 09:00 CET 15.07.13
Kamsky - Karjakin   Karjakin - Wang Yue
Ivanchuk - Leko   Giri - Topalov
Wang Hao - Gelfand   Morozevich - Mamedyarov
Grischuk - Morozevich   Gelfand - Grischuk
Mamedyarov - Giri   Leko - Wang Hao
Topalov - Wang Yue   Kamsky - Ivanchuk
Round 11 07:00 CET 16.07.13        
Ivanchuk - Karjakin        
Wang Hao - Kamsky        
Grischuk - Leko        
Mamedyarov - Gelfand        
Topalov - Morozevich        
Wang Yue - Giri        

Grand Prix Beijing 2013 | Round 2 standings

 


Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Anonymous's picture

Karjakin didn't go to Beijing to pick up flowers ! What a game. Wang Hao totally outplayed. Hope to see Sergei at the candidates

ShockeR's picture

God damnit ! I keep on forgetting that this is being played in China and that round starts at 9 00 CET, not at 15 00.. -.-

atheistbishop's picture
Chess Fan's picture

Thank you for posting this nice game.

Niima's picture

Agreed. One forgets how elegant many of Karpov's games were.

Chess Fan's picture

What a brilliant game by Karjakin. I was amazed with his keeping his cool, excellent defense, and the timely devastating attack against none other than Wang Hao. We keep talking about Magnus, but I wonder whether the next World Champion from this young 20 something generation is Sergei Karjakin! This game is worth studying to learn from to know how Super GMs play and win even if you are titled player yourself.

Anonymous's picture

Magnus is better then karjakin

Anonymous's picture

No no, as soon as someone wins a game or two he is better than Carlsen. How did Karjakin do in Tal Memorial, by the way? Now he is the next World Champion just because Wang and Moro blunder away their games before move 20 :)

Chess Fan's picture

I am sorry Anonymous. I did not mean to say that Karjakin is better than Magnus, but I am wondering if it is going to happen; that with the way Karjakin is CONSISTENTLY improving, whether he has the best chance of being the next World Champion from that generation if Magnus loses to Vishy in November (on paper, a lesser but finite possibility).
Magnus is the highest rated player of all time, and it definitely has my respect. He is arguably playing the best tournament chess in the World last three years or so. Incredibly chess.

Chess Fan's picture

Leaving the active legends like Vlady and Peter Svidler aside, Karjakin is turning out to be Russia's greatest weapon and pride in chess!
Do you Russians agree?

ShockeR's picture

Too bad that he is actually from Ukraine.. ;)

Thomas Oliver's picture

For what it's worth, I think Karjakin is actually ethnic Russian. In any case, he improved a lot since his controversial federation change.

US-Americans take pride in Kamsky, Dutch take pride in Giri, Germans take pride in Naiditsch, ... (who else?).

Anonymous's picture

Karjakin is from Ukraine. And i do not think his improvement has to do with any federation.

Federation is about money !

Anonymous's picture

Karjakin is Russian born in Ukraine.

Anonymous's picture

Can you read ?

Anónimo's picture

Italians take pride in the fabulous Fabiano!

Chess Fan's picture

Rightfully so. He has become really World Championship potential off-late, and his games, defense, and end-game techniques are fabulous and study-worthy. Loves his games off-late.

Chess Fan's picture

Yes, of course I know that. I have been following his games since he was 12 and became the world's youngest every grandmaster.
But he moved federations and now officially represents Russia - as you know, enjoying Russia's incredible chess resources and support. That is why I said that.
Hope I do not offend any of my Ukrainian and Russian friends - but culturally, I find them very close here in America, and they also play chess in a very similar way - remarkably well!

strana's picture

Both Nepo and Andreikin are better than Karjakin

Anonymous's picture

Sure !

Anonymous's picture

with 1659 elo you can really tell !

S3's picture

I have my doubts, but perhaps they could become stronger. Andreikin needs to get more top invites and Nepo just needs to get more serious about chess. His time management and attitude sometimes look amateuristic imo.

Chess Fan's picture

Come on! You are just baiting everyone to react!
Nepo is a very good player and I have not seen much of Andrekin's games though he seems to have quite some Russian following here.

Anonymous's picture

What a picture ! Sir Wang Yue ! superb

Chess Fan's picture

Ha Ha!. Now that you mention.......
...I agree. SIR Wang Yue..Cute.

Anonymous's picture

Why do the Yanks always wear these stupid caps?
I thought FIDE adopted a dress code that forbids these eye-sores.

Rodzjer's picture

+1
When I saw that pic, I was thinking: how about you or me wear that suit and the cap at work? Ridiculous.

Anonymous's picture

Chess and rap and football ! Hmmmm

Anónimo's picture

Too much ado about nothing...

Morley's picture

Great job by Karjakin. I am rooting for the old guys, but I wouldn't be surprised if he takes this and the World Cup. In other news, the live ratings are dominated by younger players for the first time that I can remember; places 1-5 are all 30 or younger.

Thomas Oliver's picture

"the live ratings are dominated by younger players" - for such a statement, Aronian (who turned 30 last year) and Grischuk (who is 29) have to be called young or at least younger rather than "somewhere in between". Somewhat funny that there are hardly any players aged 31-35 in the world top (Leko and Morozevich defend the honor of that 'generation'), while there are quite a lot aged 36-40 (Kramnik, Topalov, Kamsky, Svidler) and 40+ (Anand, Gelfand, Adams, Ivanchuk). [I put the bar at Elo 2725, which happens to be the minimum rating for a wildcard into the next candidates event]

At the top, Karjakin's current 1.1 point lead and Grischuk's 0.1 point advantage over Kramnik is hardly 'domination'. When Karjakin overtook Kramnik for the first time (July 2011 with his - so far - peak official rating of 2788) it didn't last long, both because Karjakin had a setback and Kramnik had a comeback - winning Dortmund, Unive and London, needed to secure his rating spot for the Kazan candidates. Will history repeat itself? I believe in a comeback by Kramnik (again starting with Dortmund?) more than in a setback by Karjakin. But the third time (or maybe already the second time, i.e. now) could be the last time, as Kramnik can't recover or will retire - IMO this would/will be a loss to the chess world no matter whether one likes Vlad or not.

Morley's picture

I doubt Kramnik is going anywhere, and I'm glad for that!

Chess Fan's picture

You always make interesting points Thomas. Thanks.

Septimus 's picture

10...Be6 seemed like a wasted move in Karjakin-Hao. Why not a6 instead? Looks like a Yugoslav-Dragon structure, where white may be half a tempo up. What a cool attack!

The_Joker's picture

The real games are yet to come, as Karjakin has played two of the equal last placegetters.

Fishy's picture

Kramnik and Anand were 2 last placegetters recently...so this doesn't mean a thing!

oyuncu's picture

Mamedyarov 1-0 Ivancuk . Mamedyarov good player

Septimus 's picture

Karjakin is now on 3-0! Wow!

Ivanchuck blundered and lost immediately.

Anonymous's picture

And Marion Bartoli won Wimbledon

Anonymous's picture

Good to see Mamedyarov at the top 10 again...

...

Septimus 's picture

It was only a matter of time given his superb shape of late.

Anonymous's picture

Ivanchuk helped him a little bit, but i'm glad to see him in good shape.

On the other hand, Karjakin is insanely precise and wonderfully agressive. Great calculations both in defence and attack, very very impressive

Anonymous's picture

Peter is in wimbeldon :)

Chess Fan's picture

Is that why he is so quiet? ;-)
He is so lucky, if true!

Jorge's picture

Ivanchuk goes with his king to defend the D pawn, the e pawn is well enough protected.

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