Reports | May 30, 2012 10:20

Anand beats Gelfand in tiebreak, retains world title (VIDEO)

Anand beats Gelfand in tiebreak, retains world title

Viswanathan Anand defeated Boris Gelfand 2.5-1.5 in the rapid tiebreak on Wednesday. The Indian won the World Championship in Moscow and retained his world title for the third time. After winning the 2007 World Championship tournament in Mexico City, Anand defeated Vladimir Kramnik in 2008 and Veselin Topalov in 2010 and now emerged as the winner in Moscow as well.

Gelfand congratulates Anand at the end of the 4th tiebreak game

Event  World Championship MatchPGN via TWIC
Dates May 11th-30th, 2012
Location Moscow, Russia
System Match
Players

Viswanathan Anand & Boris Gelfand

Rate of play 120 minutes for 40 moves, then 60 minutes for 20 moves and then 15 minutes to finish the game with 30 seconds increment from move 61
Prize fund 2.55 million US $ (60% for the winner or 55% if a tiebreak is needed)
More information Read all info here
Videos ChessVibes on YouTube

 

Video of the tiebreak

A very equal match, with two players extremely close to each other in terms of both chess strength and opening preparation, came to an end on Wednesday with a tense rapid tiebreak that was won 2.5-1.5 by Anand. In the State Tretyakov Gallery in central Moscow, hundreds of spectators had come to see the showdown – more than the playing hall could hold. "It went my way," Anand commented afterwards, admitting that a fair share of luck had been involved.

The start of the tiebreak, with Gelfand playing White

Even on this very last day Gelfand didn't really play worse than his opponent, but he needed much more time on the clock. Where Anand showed a "regular" time consumption during his classical games, in the tiebreak the hallmark of his success was his speed.

The games were played at 25 minutes and 10 seconds increment per move. After each encounter there was a 10-minute break in which the players could consult two of their seconds who were backstage. With a clock counting down visibly on stage, this schedule was strictly followed and no incidents occurred.

FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov was one of the spectators | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

It was quite a different day from all the others. The level of security was much higher this time, mostly to avoid noise and other disturbances in the playing hall. We filmed the start of game 1 and then went to the press room for a while. When we wanted to film the final part of the game, we were not allowed back into the playing hall. As it turned out, it had been announced – in Russian only – that people could only leave the hall, but not re-enter, during the games.

Just when the guard at the door said njet one more time, we noticed that we were standing right next to Andrei Filatov, the main sponsor of the event. When we explained the situation, he said: "I'm having the same problem!" Amazingly, even the man who paid for everything couldn't get in! However, all this was quickly resolved when we spotted organizer Ilya Levitov in the corridor...

Gelfand started with the white pieces in the first game, which was a very sharp fight. Anand got an advantage, but it seems that with 21...Bxg3 he miscalculated. After 22.Ra3! and especially 27.Rxb7 it was the World Champion who had to watch out. Instead of 28.Qxh6 perhaps with 28.Qd3 Gelfand could have tried for more.

PGN string

Game 1 in progress, this time seen from the stage | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

In the second game Anand repeated his Rossolimo Sicilian. Probably following more home analysis he won a pawn, but Gelfand clearly had compensation with active pieces and a bishop against a knight. Later in the ending he was even playing for a win for a while, but Anand maintained his extra pawn. With much less time on the clock (basically playing on the increment at some point) Gelfand suddenly allowed his bishop to be exchanged for white's knight, and the resulting R+p vs R was a textbook win – Anand didn't even have to show it.

PGN string

The third game was arguably the most dramatic, with Gelfand having excellent chances to immediately level the score. "I was lost of course," Anand admitted afterwards. Not only in the middlegame, but also in the rook ending. Just three moves before the end, Gelfand gave away the last win, again with little time on the clock.

PGN string

Gelfand agrees to a draw - he missed several wins, the clearest shortly before the end | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

Gelfand had to win the last game with Black, and he actually got an advantage. Anand was "playing too much for a draw", as he said afterwards. However, Gelfand probably chose the wrong plan at some point and as soon as white's pieces became active on the kingside, Anand knew that the worst was behind him.

PGN string

Here are a few quotes from Anand at the press conference:

It was incredibly tense. Right now probably the only feeling you have is relief. I think I'm even too tense to be happy but I'm really relieved.

I would say that my nerves held out better. I simply held on for dear life.

The problem with such a tight match is that every mistake has a much higher value than in a match where there are mistakes going back and forth in every game. In a match where there were so few chances for me it was really an incredibly heavy blow to lose game 7. I cannot remember such a black day. I couldn't sleep. That day I really thought I'd blown the match.

Vishy Anand | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

More comments by Anand are included in our video above.

Gelfand said:

I would say that it was an equal match, and that I was better sometimes, for example in the second game. I think I had more than enough compensation for the pawn and good chances. Probably the problem of the whole tiebreak was that I was behind on the clock for most of the time. In such a situation it is sometimes difficult to find the best move on the spot, which happened with my blunders in games 2 and 3. Also in game 4 I had the advantage but because of the same problem, I failed to convert it.

Boris Gelfand | Photo Alexey Yushenkov

On Monday Hans-Walter Schmitt, a good friend of Anand and organizer of over a dozen of strong rapid chess events in Mainz, said that "Vishy must be the favorite in the tiebreak. He won almost all of my tournaments!" And indeed, Anand, who owns an apartment in Germany right next to Schmitt and who spent his last weeks before the match preparing right there, proved that Schmitt had predicted right.

The winning team: Peter Heine Nielsen, Radek Wojtaszek, Surya Ganguly, Eric van Reem, Hans-Walter Schmitt (back), Aruna Anand, Vishy Anand, Rustam Kasimdzhanov (front) | Photo thanks to Mate in Moscow

Anand pocketed approximately US $ 1.4 million (1,13 million Euro) -- 55% of the total prize fund of USD 2.55 million. Gelfand won approximately US $ 1.15 million (92,700 Euro).

According to the latest FIDE schedule, Vishy Anand will defend his title in October-November 2013 against the winner of the next Candidates tournament, to be held in March 2013.

Match score

 

 


 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Mark De Smedt's picture

If a majority of top players prefer a rapid tie-break rather than playing extra classical games until the first win, I could understand that (it would be nice to know their opinion on this matter). But then if all 4 (or 8, or 20) rapid games are drawn, again you will need a solution for determining the winner. In such cases I still think a smart system of drawing odds (see above) would be much, much better than switching to blitz (or worse, an Armageddon game or even a coin toss).

By the way, I do love blitz and rapid, and agree with Bronkenstein on their potential for attracting more people (the same goes for blind chess). However classical chess, and especially WC matches or qualifiers such as the candidates' tournament, deserve better than a blitz tie-break or a 3-1-0 scoring system because both encourage participants to play objectively inferior moves.

The Sofia rule is something else: maybe a mild version (no draws before move 40 unless by repetition) would be a good compromise between grandmasters' and spectators'/sponsors' comfort. On this matter too, it would be nice to know the opinion of top players.

Bronkenstein's picture

Mark Dvoretsky, whom we might consider an extreme conservative classicist (as opposed to , lessay, Grischuk who is not just hungry for more blitz/rapid events + long time ago promissed FIDE B/R ratings , but even for speeding up the classical games , justifying it by ´draw death´) recently proposed ´slow rapid´ TBs , I don´t remember the exact tempo, but substantially slower than 25´+10´´ , 2 games per day IIRC. Kramnik proposed TB to be played before the classical part!? That would pretty much imbalance the match - not that I agree with him on that (since I am satisfied with the content of the match, and therefore I see no reason to change rules).

I don´t remember hearing any GMs talk against rapid TBs, maybe there is few but the number should be insignificant. The problems they consider critical seem to be elsewhere ATM.

In years to come we will, no matter what we might prefer (and I have very classical, conservative POW) see more and more Sofia, 3-1-0 and such. For example, in the upcoming Tal Memorial , players will get their numbers by playing DRR(?) blitz , so the winners of blitz tournament will have one more white - very important thing on that level of preparation.

Anonymous's picture

Aronian on twitter:
Congrats to World Champion Anand! Great comeback in the later stage of the match! Gelfand deserves a praise for his creative and dynamic play!
Mig Greengard on reply:
What, did they play another match? ; )
Aronian on reply:
How come the less a person knows about a subject, the more he treats it with disrespect.

Salute! GM Aronian.

Mark De Smedt's picture

Great !

RealityCheck's picture

Hilarious!! I bet that comment From Lev shut Mij's big mouth up. Tell it like it is Lev!!

Sligunner's picture

61...Rh7?? is such a bad move how could it ever be played by a GM? It loses a tempo, blocks the pawn, allows black's king to move towards the danger area... how can such a most be played, time prssure or no time pressure. Any 1600+ player in the world, with ten seconds on the clock, would play 61...Kg3. It's astonishing. It's either: a) pressure, or b) deliberate. GMs play under pressure all the time, so... make your own conclusions.

Anonymous's picture

Gelfand played it with 35 seconds on the clock, and he had a 10 second increment for every move so he never had to risk losing on time in that position. Surprising that he didn't play a natural move like Kg3 instead of Rh7.

Anonymous's picture

Deliberate-Nonsense... You really think he wasn't able to find a less embarassing blunder?
He clearly lost his nerve.

danprizzy's picture

The best irony of all is the match was decided in a drawn position that Gelfand failed to find the right moves for. Imagine the real score if they actually played out all of the games. I don't care what sort of rosy glasses you try and put on. This match was a huge disappointment and a black eye for global chess.

nis's picture

morozevich plays exiciting chess but he is not the world champion, yes surely he can loose all the time and crib also but he is not world champion, obviously when out of opening u have no advantage it is hard to fight (remember kasparov running away from fights even when trailing? he just got nothing out of the opening) the only wow factor was kasparov lost ...., anand or any other player will use match strategy which works best, aggressive against kramnik , mix against topalov and pragmatic approach against gelfand.

nis's picture

morozevich plays exiciting chess but he is not the world champion, yes surely he can loose all the time and crib also but he is not world champion, obviously when out of opening u have no advantage it is hard to fight (remember kasparov running away from fights even when trailing? he just got nothing out of the opening) the only wow factor was kasparov lost ...., anand or any other player will use match strategy which works best, aggressive against kramnik , mix against topalov and pragmatic approach against gelfand.

sundararajan ganesan's picture

congrats vishy for winning the World title, yet again! congrats Boris for matching wits with the tiger from madras! of course, you too had your chances in the match. the tie-break games were exciting, just like the T20 cricket matches of the IPL ( the just concluded Indian Premier League)!

Anonymous's picture

Interesting comment and well said.
I am sure that both Anand and Peter Svidler would agree, being cricket fans themselves!

Chess Fan's picture

I forgot to put on my moniker.
Congrats to Anand and my hats off to Boris Gelfand, who I respect like people like Aronian and Anand.

nis's picture

today it is easy for patzers to say ohh 2nd game was drawn ..., 10 years back when comp was not strong enough , correct eval would not even be known for days, this is a technical game which most fans do not understand and rely on computer eval which top grandmasters cannot tell in real time,

chessbums's picture

Are there responses / congratulatory messages from other top players to Anand and Gelfand? I know Aronian responded on the Twitter - very nice of him

chessbums's picture

By the way did Gelfand congratulate Anand? Any links?

redivivo's picture

He didn't congratulate him in public at least, and he said that the tiebreak wasn't equal, he played better than Anand. :-)

chessbums's picture

I felt Anand went a bit overboard praising Gelfand for his determination, preparation etc. etc. While it is true that Gelfand was a worthy opponent, I still felt Anand could have restrained himself a bit after the victory.

Well in rapid games, it is not just getting an upper hand in a particular point, how well you adapt to the faster time controls, find the best possible moves within the short time matters - which Gelfand could not handle well, yes in that sense it wasn't equal.

Thomas's picture

Yeah it was a bit strange that Gelfand didn't mention Anand at all in his speech at the closing ceremony (only organizers and sponsors), while Anand had plenty of praise for Gelfand. These speeches start around 16:48 in the video on the match homepage, after music (Rakhmaninov?), organizers, sponsors and our beloved FIDE president.

Gelfand was visibly unhappy, which indicates that he really believed in his chances to win the match. Even I had suggested before the match that he might be happy enough to show up, push some wood and collect "his" share of the prize fund - even though I, unlike others, hadn't expected a one-sided match.

As to the rapid games, it was his spontaneous impression and he may not be all wrong. But Vishy played faster and this basically became decisive.

On the fair loser scale, Gelfand is behind Kramnik - but Vlad had a couple of days to prepare for losing his match, had already been world champion and might get another shot at the title (whether this crossed his mind right after the Bonn match is another story). But Gelfand is way ahead of Topalov - at least until he gives interviews about the match, but I seriously doubt that he will say negative things about Anand in the near future.

Mark De Smedt's picture

I like your "fair loser's scale". I'm still wondering what Gelfand really said at the press conference: according to the interpreter, he called it a very unbalanced contest, and according to the subtitles (see the video with this article) he called it a very balanced contest (in both cases he was probably referring to the tie-break more than to the first 12 games). I really admire the interpreter who not only worked in both directions (Russian-English and English-Russian), but also proved he could handle chess variations. However, in this one case I hope the subtitler was right, which would mean Gelfand did recognize both played at a comparable level (which means Anand deserved to win thanks to his ability to play good moves faster than Gelfand).

mishanp's picture

I listened to it again and he did say it was an "unbalanced" struggle - but in the sense that it was bumpy, rough and so on rather than that someone was much better i.e. similar to what Anand said when he described it as "to and fro". Then he added "but I thought I had the advantage", talked about Game 2 and then mentioned that overall his "impractical time handling" was the problem (that was missed in the subtitles). Maybe he could have given more praise, but objectively it's true that he had could easily have won 3 out of 4 of the rapid games (something Kasparov said - generally Kasparov was scathing about the quality of the tie-breaks, but of course you'd expect that :))

Just to add - by far my favourite moment of the press conference was when the Russian BBC asked Gelfand if he'd proved his critics wrong by running Anand so close. In his reply he let vent some of his frustration at all the obvious negativity that had been coming from some of the reporters at the press conferences (the interpreter mixed the events up while translating - also, where I've got "writing me off" it's literally something like "packing me off into retirement"):

"I've been dealing with this for at least the last 15 years. I think at some point back in 1998 public opinion was already writing me off. But still each year, regardless of my results, I’m written off. I came second in the World Championship – that was supposed to be my “swan song”. I won the World Cup – an accident. I won the Candidates Matches – the format wasn’t the right one, the participants weren’t the right ones. And so on. So basically I don’t listen to what’s said about me. I do my thing."

Thomas's picture

"he [Gelfand] could easily have won 3 out of 4 of the rapid games" - which ones? I don't think Gelfand ever had a winning position in game 2 or 4, does Kasparov think so? In any case, "unbalanced" as the games were, there might have been three wins for Gelfand, two for Anand and maybe one draw (all in four games) :) .

BTW Anand seems to understand Gelfand's reaction (or lack thereof) after the match, this is from a German interview
http://www.zeit.de/sport/2012-06/schach-weltmeister-anand/seite-2

Q It was remarkable that you had lots of respect for each other. One says that you are friends. How closely?
Anand: I count him among my closest friends. We know each other for 23 years. We have children of the same age, that's nice. But a fight like this one can leave traces. If I had lost he would still be my friend, but I would feel some bitterness. Maybe no longer after one or two years, but possibly I would always think 'I lost that match against him'. During the WCh all went very well between us, before each game he greeted me very heartfully. He succeeds in separating the board from our relationship. And I tried the same. I like him a lot. And I know how much he is hurt.

Q He now feels bitterness.
Anand: Sure. I can imagine very well how he is feeling now.

chessbums's picture

This is a remarkable interview by Anand. I really look forward to see how Gelfand responds in coming days.

If any impulses or bitterness is in Gelfand, I am sure it will be simply blunted if he sees this news report.

mishanp's picture

Kasparov claimed game four was winning: (Shipov talked to him and recorded his opinion: http://kasparovchess.crestbook.com/threads/5848/#post-453249)

"It seems to me that Black could have won the fourth game on automatic pilot ["with his hands"], simply by pushing pawns".

Though yes, Black never missed a clear win in that game and if the match showed one thing it's that Anand remains extremely resilient in tough positions.

Generally I think Kasparov's one of those most responsible for the unnecessary negativity around the match. He had other comments that were typical of him (a grain of truth topped with a dollop of bile):

e.g. "Anand played a terrible match, but it seems it wasn't meant to be that Gelfand would beat such a weakened opponent. Anand played wonderfully in the 2008 match against Kasparov, adequately against Topalov in 2010, while his current play is on an entirely different level. The tie-break was beneath contempt..."

Then after discussing the games he says:

"Anand got lucky that Gelfand qualified to play him. If the Candidates Matches in Kazan had been run under the 6-6-8 system (6 games in the quarter-finals and semi-finals and 8 in the final) then Gelfand's chances of getting to the World Championship final would have been minimal. Someone else would have played Anand and he could have won. Let's say, Grischuk. Never mind the fact that Carlsen would have played in Kazan in that case.

I'll repeat once more that the current match for the title had nothing whatsoever to do with determining the strongest chess player in the world."

I'd add for myself that, 1) anyone's chances are small in the Candidates Matches system, whether they're the favourites or not, but there's no reason to think playing another 2 games in each round would have greatly reduced Gelfand's chances, 2) Carlsen wasn't just unhappy with the length of the matches - e.g. he was also unhappy with having to play an Azerbaijan player in Azerbaijan, or not immediately having a contract for the final match - so who knows if he'd have played, and if had then again, he might have been a slight favourite but no more, 3) for me the World Championship match is a sporting event like the football World Cup - the winner is simply the winner and needn't be the best player in the world at that moment - that's the sort of thing that fans/experts can discuss. Even if you get the top two players on the rating list in the final match the one who wins the match isn't necessarily the better player.

Mohit Sharma's picture

Thanks for the points mishanp. It seems there has been a lot of 'human' reasons for the negativity around this match. Apart from Kasparov, there are a lot of fans, who could not accept that their favourites were out of limelight.

In tennis, unsung players end up winning grand-slams, but that does not diminish the worth of that year's grand-slam.

Anonymous's picture

+ 1

chessbums's picture

This is a remarkable interview by Anand. I really look forward to see how Gelfand responds in coming days.

If any impulses or bitterness is in Gelfand, I am sure it will be simply blunted if he sees this news report.

hildcar's picture

It's time for ARONIAN vs CARLSEN!

RealityCheck's picture

Yaaaaaaaaaaaaawwwwwwwwwn!!!!!

Anonymous's picture

You mean the chicken?

Manu's picture

thx chessbase 4 illustrating my point
http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=8199
chess is becoming invisible

dev's picture

(Gelfan DID PRAISE Anand!)

Surprisingly, he genuinely does not seem to be particularly upset by his loss to India's Viswanathan Anand, the reigning world champion.

"It happens, like in Barcelona against Chelsea, when it led 2-0 against 10 players and also got the penalty kick. I can also score a goal sometimes and miss a penalty kick. All in all it was a great duel. I can only regret one truly mystical moment in the third game of the tie-breaker series, when I had an advantage and then I moved my rook away that 999 times out of a 1,000 I wouldn't dream of doing. I came here feeling sure of myself, but I played against a great master who was absolutely capable of causing me problems and also of handling some of the new things thrown at him by my team. Up until the 10th game I was pretty much in control, and then Anand recovered, thanks to his hard work and that of his team of advisers."

At one point it looked as though the world champion had lost some of his self-confidence - did you sense that as well?

"He did indeed lose a little confidence. The openings were unpleasant for him, and his team had to work hard to find their footing, even if the result in the duel was a tie."

Do you intend to compete in the world championship again?

When I lost in the quarterfinals of the Candidates Championship in 1991, Viktor Korchnoi promised me that I would go far. They already tried to 'erase' me from the list of candidates, but somehow I came back. I hope that with my excellent team I will succeed at the next Candidates Championship as well, in 2013."

dev's picture

(Gelfan DID PRAISE Anand!)

Surprisingly, he genuinely does not seem to be particularly upset by his loss to India's Viswanathan Anand, the reigning world champion.

"It happens, like in Barcelona against Chelsea, when it led 2-0 against 10 players and also got the penalty kick. I can also score a goal sometimes and miss a penalty kick. All in all it was a great duel. I can only regret one truly mystical moment in the third game of the tie-breaker series, when I had an advantage and then I moved my rook away that 999 times out of a 1,000 I wouldn't dream of doing. I came here feeling sure of myself, but I played against a great master who was absolutely capable of causing me problems and also of handling some of the new things thrown at him by my team. Up until the 10th game I was pretty much in control, and then Anand recovered, thanks to his hard work and that of his team of advisers."

At one point it looked as though the world champion had lost some of his self-confidence - did you sense that as well?

"He did indeed lose a little confidence. The openings were unpleasant for him, and his team had to work hard to find their footing, even if the result in the duel was a tie."

Do you intend to compete in the world championship again?

When I lost in the quarterfinals of the Candidates Championship in 1991, Viktor Korchnoi promised me that I would go far. They already tried to 'erase' me from the list of candidates, but somehow I came back. I hope that with my excellent team I will succeed at the next Candidates Championship as well, in 2013."

hansie's picture

Amen to that!

Sunil's picture

I actually fely very bad for Gelfand at the end of the game even though i was rooting for Anand . But i thought it was bad of Gelfand
not to aknowledge or congratulate him on his win.Anand , in every press conference keeps saying Gelfand played extremely well, but
i havent heard a single word congratulating Vishy from Gelfand.This happened in the closing ceremony where i was expecting Gelfand to concede defeat .But he didnt . So now i dont feel very bad for him and its good for the game that Anand is still champion.

dev's picture

In a rare display of irritation, Viswanathan Anand, who has just won his fifth world title, today hit out at chess great Gary Kasparov and other critics for suggesting that he lacked motivation. "I think that this is the first time I have played a match where so many people seemed to have negative opinion about me.
And the thing is I do not think I lacked motivation," Anand said about his clash with Israel's Boris Gelfand, whom he beat in Moscow on Wednesday to win his fifth world title.
42-year-old Anand told a news channel in an interview from Moscow that Kasparov "keeps talking about my age" but Gelfand was slightly older at 44.

The champion, who is known for his cool temperament, said that he had proved Russian Kasparov, who is one of the greatest ever chess players, wrong. Some years ago, he had described Kasparov as his nemesis after losing matches to him.

Not only Kasparov, "there were many people also parroting what he was saying," Anand said.

"He (Kasparov) keeps talking about my age but I could just as well say Boris (Gelfand) is even slightly older. I think the problem is all the people who started out assuming that I was the heavy favourite in this match were reluctant to admit that their prognosis was wrong," Anand said.

Anand said he never considered himself as the favourite and knew that Gelfand would be a tough opponent.

"I never saw myself as a favourite, the thing I knew Gelfand would be a very very difficult opponent. And looking at his recent plays I understood that this is how the match would go. And so I never felt I had to answer after every game 'what was going wrong?' because nothing was going wrong.

"This was Gelfand playing well and me trying to play equally well, hang in there and wait for my chance. But all those people who said I was a favourite were reluctant to admit that they were wrong and were simply saying that I lacked motivation and was playing badly and so on and on. And I definitely feel like i proved something here," said Anand.

The Indian Grandmaster gave credit to Gelfand who never allowed him to play his natural game.

"I think you have to give full credit to my opponent Gelfand. He never let me get the kind of play that I like and that is very frustrating as you like to play in a way certain but Gelfand neutralised almost everything I did and so I had to cope with that.

Manu's picture

It is obvious that Kasparov keeps talking about Anand's age as a reflection of his own miscalculation , he retired early believing that he had only down to go because of his age and lack of motivation , and being such a narcisist as he is he cannot accept Vishy 's success and determination .

gesler's picture

Congrats to Vishy for making it once again, though I'd have preferred to see Gelfand prevail at least once, he deserved it. Anand or Gelfand as temporary world champion until Aronian or Carlsen take over - this doesn't really matter for the game. Let's see if the reigning world champion is still among the top 10 when he loses his title next year.

Peter Grahn's picture

Anand is a wery nice person and a great Chessplayer.But Kasparov, Karpov and Fischer are greater then him its my and many others opinion.Kasparov was Anands Nemisis!!

MrX's picture

Kasparov was a great chess player but he can behave badly say idiotic things. When Kramnik didn't let Kasparov play his game in 2000 Kasparov went down. In 2012 Gelfand pretty much frustrated Vishy's game, but somehow Vishy managed to pull through in tie-breaks. I think that was a great achievement. Gelfand is known to be a tough grandmaster.

This match defined the Champion. The concept of #1 player is very flaky since it can change every two months and in minds of the masses it changes almost daily in Live ratings! Sure it must be nice to reach #1 spot, but World Champions will be remembered afterwards. Kasparov should shut his mouth and stop tarnishing a great tradidtion of Chess World Championship that he himself is a part of.

Manu's picture

I strongly disagree , in this actualized world no one in the general audience would give a flying pawn about you being the world champion if you are not even in the top five .
It is a lot more sellable being the actual number one than having a title that depends so much on other factors (luck ,corruption of the system , etc) , the real world champion at this moment is Magnus and no one can refute that .
4 the record im not precisely Carlsen's fan , but this is a game that cannot afford to have an outdated lider anymore.

PircAlert's picture

Times are changing. It is no longer 50 - 60 years averaging age is playing top level chess and someone younger shows up in the scene to dominate. It is no longer a time when it takes only 15 minutes for young Anand to beat Russian GMs. Or we are not in times where 1 person has the luxury to have 10 seconds and another has hardly one and the one with 10 seconds dominate. Or it is not mostly one country plays chess, mostly from government funding, and their national champion is world champion. Competition is extremely stiff nowadays as can be seen from so called champions quitting at the age of 40 or so. Computers are levelling up the field and letting the best win. The new precision high games starting to make chess look like a new sport altogether that old generation chess masters and fans alike don't even understand what is going on in the board. I wonder when the fans of old masters stop trumpeting the kind of dominance I described before as result of weak competition and learn to appreciate the super precision high quality chess!

Dominance is not when one beat the other with 2 points margin, dominance is when one makes the other think that the other cannot beat this one. Anand has proved in all the world championships!

Anand is truly the chess champion of champions!

Anonymous's picture

What are you talking about? The world # 1 is not guaranteed close to 1 and 1/2 million dollars for 12 classical games.

slonik's picture

People always get most irritated with Kasparov when he speaks the truth.

RealityCheck's picture

Kasparov never really seems happy unless he's putting someone down. In the press box with Tan Geuzdam and Svidler I noticed how really difficult it was for him to compliment Vishy or Boris; just the thought of saying something good about them or the match made him squirm, uncomfortable. Have a look for yourself....

PircAlert's picture

What does that mean? People always get irritated when Kasparov speaks?? Either that or Kasparov speaks lies some or most of the time must be true as per your claim??

It is not that he is worried people consider Anand better than him and that Anand is the greatest ever, it is just that the his brand name becoming useless that he can't use it for any money making ventures like from using it to overthrow FIDE etc. That is Kasparov's worry. Hence he appears and makes these statements whenever he has a chance.

Is anyone irritated now?

Septimus's picture

Check out pictures of the trophies on chessbase. They look simply fantastic! Apart from the ridiculously long interruptions, the russians seem to have done a superb job with the organization.

Rodzjer's picture

Here's an interesting set-up for a WC cycle:
Final WC match is played with 3 players, not 2. Cycle is A-B, C-A, B-C and repeat with inversed colours. Every player plays 6 games against every other player, so 12 games per player. Total games for the match is 18 games, so longer match for the fans. As every player has a rest day every third day, no general rest days are needed and there's a game for the fans every day.
In the end the player with most points wins. Fighting chess is promoted, because a player that only draws all his games, will likely not be WC at the end, due to decisive results in the other games where he does not play. Sofia rules are applied as well. Also preparation is going to be harder, because now players will have to prepare for 2 opponents, not 1. Meaning less "computers-at-work" chess, more human / creative chess.
The 3 players consist of the WC and 2 qualifiers. One qualifier comes from a qualifying cycle. The second qualifier comes from a grand-prix cycle of open / invitational tournaments.

dev's picture

Ananad weakness in negotiating d4 openin g has come out in open...all GM's are employing d4 only ( in contrast to e4 opening) for securing a good /winnable position against Anad...at least this the case since last 4/5 years

A World Champion has to answer to all this and , for a change , victories in a tourament or two is welcome...what to say of beating players of 2800+///not wishful expectation s from a World Champ

Pages

Latest articles