Reports | May 15, 2013 20:13

Anand, Carlsen & Karjakin win in 7th round Norway Chess

Sergey Karjakin kept his half point lead at the Norway Chess tournament on Wednesday. The tournament leader defeated Hikarua Nakamura and his main rival Magnus Carlsen also won, against Jon Ludvig Hammer. Teimour Radjabov again wasn't a shadow of the player he used to be and lost without a real fight to Vishy Anand. Thursday is a rest day.

Flor & Fjære | All photos courtesy of Norway Chess

For the seventh round, again for only one day, the tournament moved to a different place. This time the location was Flor & Fjære, an island almost fully occupied with trees and flowers, together with a restaurant. While some other players were not too happy with the many changes of venues at the event (although nobody really complained!) tournament leader Sergey Karjakin was the most positive of all:

It was brilliant. I would have liked to play all of the tournament here!

We found a video on YouTube by Jarle Heitmann who filmed the arrival of the players with his phone (unfortunately shot in portrait mode).

Here are a few pictures taken today:

As you can see from the pictures, it was actually not a very nice day today, with lots of rain. (For much better and in fact stunningly beautiful pictures see the official website!) Levon Aronian pointed out that perhaps that was a good thing, so that the players wouldn't be tempted too much to finish their games quickly and explore the island! For most of the players there was plenty of time for that anyway, as everyone was going to have dinner together after the last game finished.

On to the chess, which started with a draw between Peter Svidler and Veselin Topalov. It was another 3.Bb5 Nd7 Sicilian, which Svidler had with Black against Carlsen earlier in the tournament. With White he went for a setup which involved an early Nb1-d2, in order to play Nc4 and attack d6. However, during the game he realized that his "cunning plan" didn't work, and instead he had to go for an ending which was just equal.

PGN string

The press conference with Peter Svidler, Veselin Topalov and Simen Agdestein, who celebrated his birthday today

The next game was also a rather quick affair, and it was not a draw. Teimour Radjabov had another offday, like he's had several times in his recent tournaments. Let's hope the poor Azerbaijani will recover soon, because this is just way below what he's capable of. It must be added that Anand played a fine game with lots of precise moves.

PGN string

Wang Hao and Levon Aronian played an interesting draw in which the Armenian player basically took too many risks with his ...Ne8 and ...f6 setup. He didn't like his middlegame position at all, but somehow the Chinese couldn't profit. The press conference was quite entertaining which was not that surprising considering the fact that these two players are good friends and have worked together in the past.

PGN string

Magnus Carlsen then defeated his compatriot Jon Ludvig Hammer with Black from what really should have been a drawn ending. The game was about equal all the time and it seemed that if anyone had winning chances it was White, especially since Carlsen was having considerably less time. But in his opponent's time trouble Hammer started to play inaccurately.

I feel kind of stupid. Nobody should lose that position as White. I feel I got some chances and I spoilt them and that's not a good feeling,

said Hammer. Carlsen:

I was really struggling both yesterday and today and I really need some rest.

PGN string

And so Sergey Karjakin needed to win his game to maintain his half point lead over Carlsen, and he did. Also for the Russian player things didn't go that smoothly.

I was lucky. The position I got out of the opening was just very stupid. I didn't expect this very sharp line,

said Karjakin, who only got an advantage after a mistake by Hikaru Nakamura on move 23. After that it was very difficult for Black and although the American defended like a lion, the result was never in doubt.

PGN string

Sergey Karjakin: still leading with two rounds to go after the rest day

Norway Chess 2013 | Pairings & results

Round 1 08.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 2 09.05.13 15:00 CET
Carlsen ½-½ Topalov   Topalov ½-½ Radjabov
Anand ½-½ Aronian   Hammer 0-1 Karjakin
Nakamura 1-0 Wang Hao   Wang Hao 1-0 Svidler
Svidler 1-0 Hammer   Aronian 1-0 Nakamura
Karjakin 1-0 Radjabov   Carlsen ½-½ Anand
Round 3 10.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 4 12.05.13 15:00 CET
Anand 1-0 Topalov   Topalov ½-½ Hammer
Nakamura ½-½ Carlsen   Wang Hao ½-½ Radjabov
Svidler ½-½ Aronian   Aronian 0-1 Karjakin
Karjakin 1-0 Wang Hao   Carlsen ½-½ Svidler
Radjabov 1-0 Hammer   Anand 0-1 Nakamura
Round 5 13.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 6 14.05.13 15:00 CET
Nakamura ½-½ Topalov   Topalov ½-½ Wang Hao
Svidler ½-½ Anand   Aronian 1-0 Hammer
Karjakin 0-1 Carlsen   Carlsen 1-0 Radjabov
Radjabov ½-½ Aronian   Anand ½-½ Karjakin
Hammer 1-0 Wang Hao   Nakamura ½-½ Svidler
Round 7 15.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 8 17.05.13 15:00 CET
Svidler ½-½ Topalov   Topalov - Aronian
Karjakin 1-0 Nakamura   Carlsen - Wang Hao
Radjabov 0-1 Anand   Anand - Hammer
Hammer 0-1 Carlsen   Nakamura - Radjabov
Wang Hao ½-½ Aronian   Svidler - Karjakin
Round 9 18.05.13 12:00 CET        
Karjakin - Topalov        
Radjabov - Svidler        
Hammer - Nakamura        
Wang Hao - Anand        
Aronian - Carlsen        

Norway Chess 2013 | Round 7 standings

 

Schedule

Date Activity Place Time
07.05.2013 Blitz University of Stavanger 17:00 – 19:00
08.05.2013 Round 1 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
09.05.2013 Round 2 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
10.05.2013 Round 3 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
11.05.2013 School tournament Kongeparken, Ålgård  
12.05.2013 Round 4 Aarbakke AS, Bryne 15:00 – 23:00
13.05.2013 Round 5 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
14.05.2013 Round 6 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
15.05.2013 Round 7 Flor & Fjære, Sør Hidle 15:00 – 23:00
16.05.2013 Day off    
17.05.2013 Round 8 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
18.05.2013 Round 9 Stavanger Konserthus, Stavanger 12:00 – 19:00

Locations (Google Map)

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Anonymous's picture

Go Magnus !! you can win the tourny !

Thomas Oliver's picture

Yep, go Magnus!! Magnus!! Hip hip hooray!

The Golden Knight's picture

Go Carjakin go! We know that you are better than Karlsen.

Chris's picture

Who is we?

Anonymous's picture

Nice game by Anand

Anonymous's picture

Again, Carlsen won a grinding end game against Hammer. Wow, what a Master. Teaching the importance of end game mastery to all chess players of the world.

Anonymous's picture

Everything can happen ! SAD though to see Radjabov sinking ...

Eadon's picture

"SAD though to see Radjabov sinking" - must be hard playing after you've been highly publically dismantled in the end game yet again by MC. Now he can't even get a draw from Anand. Cruel game, chess.

fuzzylogic's picture

"can't even get a draw from anand" .Stupid most comment ever!!!.Do you know anything about chess ? yesterday anand's win was master piece he is not like carlsen who wins most of the game through cheap end game tricks.

Mart Smeets's picture

Well, cheap endgame tricks does also not do justice to carlsen's endgame technique. And pushing for your last chance is simply part of that. But I agree that this comment is not very intelligent: publically dismantled: that must mean something like everyone will be able to beat Radjabov now, even the poster of this comment, which can be sincerly doubted.

Anonymous's picture

I'm afraid to say it for fear of being stoned, but after Carlsen loses the WC match in November, he'll be remembered for bringing to chess the largest number of dumb fans.

Chris's picture

fortune teller?

Thomas Oliver's picture

"can't even get a draw from Anand" may have made some sense last year - but in 2013, Caruana, Aronian and Topalov were also outplayed by Anand, Kramnik lost after blundering, and Karjakin had to work hard for a draw in this latest event. Anand isn't that weak or toothless.
"Cheap endgame tricks" is an exaggeration (and a phrase borrowed from or adapted by Carlsen himself), BTW are there also 'expensive tricks'? Maybe Radjabov was still affected by his loss against Carlsen, but - with his generally poor form - he might have lost to Anand also if he had played him before Carlsen, just like he lost against Karjakin in round 1.

bronkenstein's picture

Good run by Karjakin so far. Sad that the World Champion improved his performance but still cant win the tournament.... Thats sad because people keep saying that WC not wining in super tournys and I was rooting for him. So its either Karjakin or Carlsen now.

Anonymous's picture

Every player has to adopt to new techniques continuously. This happens in all sports all the time. It just becomes tough for old players, since the power of concentration, reflexes and thinking ability gradually decreases.

When a player is trying hard to change his style of play (Changing from taking draws at the end of middle game to fighting till the end), initially you lose a fair amount of games. It takes at least 2 to 3 years to master the new style. Some people may be able to adopt faster like Kramnik. In Anand's case, it is taking longer.

bronkenstein's picture

Just few typos away from reasonably good imitation of my style. The content also might need some work (bit more, I am afraid).

Curious's picture

@ bronkenstein

What kind of an idiot steals another person's handle? Just ignore the fool.

bronkenstein's picture

TY. It´s probably one of my ´friends´ from Chessgames or Chessbomb (I am bronkenstein on both), but since Chessvibes doesn´t seem to bother with ´handle copyrights´, I am also having my part of fun, why take it too seriously?

bronkenstein's picture

A clone? yet again? I think I am going to start rooting for Carlsen because my fellow Anand fans on chessbomb accuse Carlsen and Hammer of Match Fixing. I want to see fair and just fight in chess

S3's picture

I'm sad..the brave carlsen fans used to use my nickname first but now they ignore me completely :(

Zeblakob's picture

The real brokenstein uses accents like that ( ´ ) and not like that ( ' ).

Anonymous's picture

Wow, close finish ahead. Carlsen probably must win both his last two games (including a black against Aronian) to keep his chances for a win on tie break, not easy at all even for him. Karjakin might drop half a point, but hardly will he lose. Great chess and entertainment :-)

Anonymous's picture

not impossible that Karjakin gets 1/2, Carlsen 1.5/2 and Anand 2/2 ...

Septimus's picture

This sounds odd "He defeated Hikarua Nakamura himself..."

The "himself" can be removed.

Magnus the magnificent! Also, nice aggressive play by Anand. b5 was a classic!

Jambow's picture

Karjakin got Nakamura in trouble from the get and got it done. Nakamura drops another game where a deep pawn cramped his position, pattern? Fairness and credit to Karjakin who played excellent.

Anand showing some WC worthy form again getting the not yet recovered Radjabov with a touch down.

Magnus overcame the Hammer with excellent end game technique but at 200 elo it is almost expected. Hammer actually played above his rating to the end of the middle game so no shame.

Topalov/Svidler draw.

Well can Karjakin continue the best form I can remember from him, a small improvement in endgame form and his elo makes a big jump.

S3's picture

You have a short term memory by the looks of it..Karjakins results so far are impressive and he is playing well but nothing exceptional by his own standard. Zug was his latest extraordinary tournament really.

Jambow's picture

Karjakin got Nakamura in trouble from the get and got it done. Nakamura drops another game where a deep pawn cramped his position, pattern? Fairness and credit to Karjakin who played excellent.

Anand showing some WC worthy form again getting the not yet recovered Radjabov with a touch down.

Magnus overcame the Hammer with excellent end game technique but at 200 elo it is almost expected. Hammer actually played above his rating to the end of the middle game so no shame.

Topalov/Svidler draw.

Well can Karjakin continue the best form I can remember from him, a small improvement in endgame form and his elo makes a big jump.

Anonymous's picture

We've been watching Radgaboy's ship sink for several months now.

Let us add this middle game disaster against Anand to the list of end game virtuoso's he handed to Carlsen..

Jambow's picture

Almost forgot the Armenian and the Chinaman. Hoa looked good and I preferred his position when I left.

Magnus has broken chess from the cycle of opening prep as the most important factor to a playable position and incredible end game technique as most relevant. Nakamura is correct they all need to understand how the Wunderkind is able to out maneuver almost 2800 players and win from a drawn position. Tenacity and calculation worthy of a champion. No doubt Magnus can be placed amongst the best end game players the game has ever known, hard to argue any particular player was clearly superior.

I hope Karjakin goes all the way with this one, but if Magnus passes on the last lap it was a good race and the chess fans got a show.

Mountebank's picture

"No doubt Magnus can be placed amongst the best end game players the game has ever known, hard to argue any particular player was clearly superior."

Happen to agree with you, though unless you're just trolling, expect pages of half-baked nonsense from S3, Bronk*whatever, and TO wailing about Carlsen's luck.

S4's picture

Well, it was quite a bunch of luck, to be honest.

bronkenstein's picture

If you took some time to go through my comments here (at least the ones from 2,3 or more days ago, before the clone invasion), you could conclude that my ´nonsense´ is, at least, well baked.

Also, no1 in his right mind would argue against the fact that Magnus is one of the best endgame players ever, but you certainly won´t hear me praising him too often, many outthere are overDoing it regularly, I´m just watching the Beatlemania =)

Anonymous's picture

who are you to ask people to go through all your comments? Are you VIP? its hilarious how selfish people are these days

Thomas Oliver's picture

As you asked for it ... : I won't discuss Carlsen's endgame technique in general - well a little bit: to me technique means trying to make progress yourself rather than just waiting for mistakes by the opponent which are accurately and mercilessly exploited.

But today's game was certainly not a Carlsen masterpiece but fine losing technique from Hammer. The position after 26.-Rc8 was completely equal (0.00) according to engines - black has the c-file but can't do anything with it. How can white lose such a position? First you weaken the pawn structure (27.Nb5!). Then you let a black rook penetrate to the second rank (32.e4!) - b2 will fall and black gets an outside passed pawn. Then you decline the opportunity to get an own passer (33.e5!) - that's enough to lose the game, Carlsen didn't have to show anything special, not even "cheap tricks", Hammer did it all himself!
This doesn't mean that Hammer threw the game, but it was a psychologically difficult situation for him: he owes this supertournament invitation to Carlsen, and Carlsen and his fans wanted Magnus to win - certainly in the given tournament situation, particularly when Karjakin got the upper hand against Nakamura.

Fortunately (IMO), this was the only good news for Carlsen fans today - who also tend to be Anand haters, and some seem also Nakamura fans.

Morley's picture

I can't tell if the actual T.O.'s trolling is getting worse, or if an imitator is getting better.

Thomas Oliver's picture

That is not too difficult... No one is worse than I

Morley's picture

Thomasoliverception. BWAM.

Thomas Oliver's picture

This was an imitator (and a pretty poor one) but the comment above is the original. Calling someone a troll because you cannot or do not even want or try to refute the content of the post is a funny debating technique ... . Also the full report (now available) criticizes 27.Nb5?! - but I don't think 27.Nf5 is the only alternative and better move (27.e3, 27.Rd2).

I actually (and this isn't ironic) feel a bit sorry for Hammer: the way he messed up would lend itself to conspiracy theories, but I don't think it was done on purpose (though I do think he didn't really mind losing to help his countryman to whom he owes something).
Two things might "save" him:
- the fact that he played as badly by GM standards in a few other games (against Svidler and Aronian)
- the tendency to call each and every win by Carlsen a brilliancy.

Morley's picture

To imply that Hammer underwent some sort of psychological dilemma, a dilemma arising from the acknowledgement that he "owes" Carlsen something for (you assume) getting him into this event, and that all of this (together with Hammer somehow being concerned during the game with what Carlsen fans "want") ultimately contributed to him losing a game he wouldn't have if he were facing someone else, is absurd. You are either thoroughly delusional (not to mention eager to slander players whose motives you have no way of knowing) or an unusually persistent troll.

Yes, Hammer made some mistakes in time trouble, and lost to someone 250 points higher rated than him. That's the whole story here.

For the record, I am a fan of Anand (and Nakamura), and don't think Magnus' win today was "brilliant" in any way.

S3's picture

Morley, what exactly is trolling to you in t.o. his post? The accurate description of Hammers loss, or his reply to comments about him.
As it is I think you are the troll morley, blinded by bias and unable to produce a reasonable reply.

Septimus's picture

T.O is slipping into dotage hence the rubbish arguments.

Anonymous's picture

I start to think you are the one using T.O. nickname in order to make senseless replies.

Septimus's picture

I don't have to appropriate anybody's nick to portray them as an idiot. If I want to call out somebody, I do so directly.

Niima's picture

@Thomas

I think good technique includes not making mistakes and just maintaining the position. It is hard to avoid mistakes in chess, particularly the more subtle ones in the endgame.

Thomas Oliver's picture

I do agree that good technique _includes_ not making mistakes, but I don't think that's all there's to it. Taking just Carlsen's wins against radjabov yesterday and Hammer today: in both cases it's fairly clear where the opponent went wrong. For the most impressive technical wins, it's hard to tell (for opponent and spectators, and even after the game) which move was wrong to shift the balance from equal or slightly worse but drawn to lost.

Niima's picture

Perhaps, but Carlson does his job and when/how the opponent makes a mistake is not under his control. Besides, he has won other notable endgames in the past. Grinding out wins has been a trademark of his play for years.

Anonymous's picture

TO. your anticarlsen propaganda reminds antifischer propaganad made by russian media in 1960-70.

Anonymous's picture

All hail to the mighty lord Carlsen!

Anonymous's picture

Dear Thomas, your posts are certainly elaborate, obviously you also intended to appear balanced and inspired of good intentions (if you consider praising Kramnik and Anand worth all the effort). On the other hand, liking Anand, Kramnik, Gelfand and all the Russians doesn't mean you have to hate or belittle the strongest chess player on earth, Carlsen or Nakamura even. Your helpless tries in that direction often look slightly ridiculous, not exactly contributing to the credibility of your otherwise reasonable judgement. If some dudes need the controversial drama to enjoy themselves, you don't have to take the "challenge" automatically. Oh btw, where has redivivo been lately?

Mountebank's picture

"to me technique means trying to make progress yourself rather than just waiting for mistakes by the opponent which are accurately and mercilessly exploited."

My dear chap, perhaps you misunderstand what technique means - In chess, it means accurately and mercilessly exploiting mistakes. This is quite hard to do for most of us, unless we only play complete beginners.

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