Reports | July 24, 2012 18:11

Bacrot and Carlsen winners in round 2 Biel

Carlsen beats Wang Hao in round 2

Magnus Carlsen and Anish Giri share the lead after two rounds in Biel. Both won one game and drew one to score 4 points, as the football scoring system is used in Biel. Carlsen crushed Wang Hao on Tuesday while Giri held a draw with Black against Hikaru Nakamura. Etienne Bacrot bounced back from yesterday's loss with a spectacular win against Alexander Morozevich, who is the only player with zero points now.

Carlsen beats Wang Hao in round 2 | Photo © Biel Chess Festival

Event Biel Chess Festival | PGN
Dates July 23-August 2, 2012
Location Biel, Switzerland
System 6-player round robin
Players Carlsen, Nakamura, Morozevich, Wang Hao, Bacrot, Giri
Rate of play 40 moves in 100 minutes, then 20 moves in 50 minutes followed by 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with 30 seconds increment per move
Extra Three points for a win, one for a draw and zero for a loss. No draw offers before move 30.

We've always been a bit skeptical about the football scoring system (3 points for a win, 1 for a draw), because at most tournaments the final standings aren't that much different compared to the classical system. But perhaps we should reconsider this point of view after today's round, because after his game against Anish Giri, Hikaru Nakamura admitted that he actually played for a win in a position where he would have taken the draw if there hadn't been the possibility of scoring 3 points!

From a Bogo-Indian the American grandmaster probably missed a chance for an advantage in the middlegame. He then avoided a move repetition, but the resulting position was "confusing", said Nakamura. The result didn't change.

PGN string

Video produced by Pascal Simon (Chessbase)

Magnus Carlsen scored a crushing win against Wang Hao, who made a mistake as early as move five. Carlsen said:

He played 5...b6 instantly which I have believed for ten years to be a mistake. Maybe he just made a fingerfehler."

For the remainder of the game the Norwegian was mostly trying to find forced wins while building up an attack, assisted by two killing bishops. 

PGN string

 

Video produced by Pascal Simon (Chessbase)

The most spectacular game of the round had its own story. Caught by surprise when his opponent played the Marshall Gambit of the Semi-Slav, Etienne Bacrot spent more than half an hour on his first ten moves and about an hour on the next ten. Up till then the game was very sharp but of high quality (one GM said to Bacrot afterwards that they were following the main line of his analysis!) until Morozevich suddenly avoided the draw, missing two very nice strokes by the Frenchman.

PGN string

 

Video produced by Pascal Simon (Chessbase)


Biel 2012 | Schedule & results

Round 1 23.07.12 14:00 CET   Round 6 28.07.12 14:00 CET
Carlsen ½-½ Nakamura   Nakamura - Carlsen
Wang Hao 1-0 Bacrot   Bacrot - Wang Hao
Morozevich 0-1 Giri   Giri - Morozevich
Round 2 24.07.12 14:00 CET   Round 7 30.07.12 14:00 CET
Nakamura ½-½ Giri   Giri - Nakamura
Bacrot 1-0 Morozevich   Morozevich - Bacrot
Carlsen 1-0 Wang Hao   Wang Hao - Carlsen
Round 3 25.07.12 14:00 CET   Round 8 31.07.12 14:00 CET
Wang Hao - Nakamura   Nakamura - Wang Hao
Morozevich - Carlsen   Carlsen - Morozevich
Giri - Bacrot   Bacrot - Giri
Round 4 26.07.12 14:00 CET   Round 9 01.08.12 14:00 CET
Morozevich - Nakamura   Bacrot - Nakamura
Giri - Wang Hao   Giri - Carlsen
Bacrot - Carlsen   Morozevich - Wang Hao
Round 5 27.07.12 14:00 CET   Round 10 01.08.12 11:00 CET
Nakamura - Bacrot   Nakamura - Morozevich
Carlsen - Giri   Wang Hao - Giri
Wang Hao - Morozevich   Carlsen - Bacrot
 


Biel 2012 | Round 2 standings

# Name Rtg + = - Pts Perf
1 Carlsen,M 2837 1 1 0 4 2949
2 Giri,A 2696 1 1 0 4 2965
3 Wang Hao 2739 1 0 1 3 2775
4 Bacrot,E 2713 1 0 1 3 2755
5 Nakamura,H 2778 0 2 0 2 2767
6 Morozevich,A 2770 0 0 2 0 2447

Biel 2012 | Round 2 standings (classical)

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

redivivo's picture

Maybe Bacrot's crushing win was more of a crushing loss for Moro, who didn't want to give Bacrot the forced draw after 21. ... bxc6 and preferred use 30 minutes to find a way to lose in a couple of moves instead.

Hortensius's picture

Even more so, considering the fact that Bacrot had only 10 minutes left for 25 moves orso...

Eiae's picture

Oh no, please don't leave chess again Moro, keep fighting.

Morley's picture

Moro seems intent on one-upping his implosions. Each one is more dramatic than the last. Oh well, at least we are used to it at this point. Good game by Carlsen, he kept the pressure up and Wang Hao cracked. This time control is pretty unforgiving ... we will probably be seeing more games like this one.

Anonymous's picture

It's almost like rapid unfortunately.

Anonymous's picture

I mean blitz.

Anonymous's picture

no, i meant rapid

Anonymous's picture

I did not

Anonymous's picture

Really,....isn't it 40 moves in 100 minutes, then 20 moves in 50 minutes? Not like any rapid or blitz I've ever played.....BTW, if we each get 100 minutes for 40 moves, it's really 200 minutes combined....Isn't that enough for 40 moves?

Thomas's picture

With a 30 second increment from move 1, it actually comes down to the fairly standard 2 hours for 40 moves (or three minutes per move). If anyone still ended up playing rapid chess, it was Bacrot.

BTW - excuse the theoretical ignorance of an 1.e4 player: "Caught by surprise when his opponent played the Marshall Gambit of the Semi-Slav, Etienne Bacrot spent more than half an hour on his first ten moves and about an hour on the next ten." Wasn't it Bacrot who sacrificed a pawn, and then some? Does he really have no decent alternative to entering a sharp and for him unfamiliar line, such as 4.Nf3 or 4.e3 ?

Anonymous's picture

Go Carlsen! Superior chess understanding!!!

redivivo's picture

In his last six games Moro has five losses and one draw (with black against Kramnik).

Anonymous's picture

I think Morozevich need love.

Anonymous's picture

And you're gonna give it to him. Sweet

Anonymous's picture

No, I won't

Anonymous's picture

No

Anonymous's picture

Why not?

anna's picture

2852 points very soon for carlsen...

Al's picture

last time he cracked 2840 I thought that he'd do it but he went backwards, hopefully this time he can at least get closer to Garry's record!

bronkenstein's picture

Nice victories for Etienne and Magnus - I guess that the former is not getting enough credit for his wonderful achievement (for MC , I am never afraid of that happening :) , being outprepared &(due to that mostly) in time trouble, he kept the extremely complicated game under control until Moro overextended.

Anonymous's picture

Another great report...the Chessbase videos are sensational....Peter, you've built the #1 chess site on the Web!

Chess Fan's picture

I agree. Quite possibly.
I am also a fan of ChessBase, but there is no chance for the people to comment freely like this, unless you are a Doctor from the US or an Entrepreneur or a top scientist, when ChessBase would publish them respectfully. Here when needed and applicable, Peter responds under your comments.
The live and later coverage of important tournaments are also top notch.
Please keep up the good work Peter.

Chess Fan's picture

Maybe now we should ask Mozo about why the quality of the World Chess Championships was horrible and how Anand is no longer the best player in the world? Or has Mozo shot his mouth like Kasparov, and other current armchair quarterbacks?

Xeno's picture

How well Moro is playing doesn't influence if Anand currently is the strongest player in the world or not.

Chess Fan's picture

Manhandling and a chess player of Wang Hao like that (the best chess player China has to offer) shows how strong Magnus is (not surprising).
Barcot has always had my attention as a chess prodigy and I am glad that he seems to be starting to fulfill his promise and potential off late. Hope he keeps it up.

columbo's picture

yes, let's ask Moro, i'm pretty sure he can explain precisely who what and why ! pretty sure his answer would be clever, Entertaining, informative, instructional, educative, even USEFUL ... and all of this for free ! whatever his good shape / bad shape ... Moro always been like that, that's part of his charm ...

Joe's picture

Sad thing Moiro had to withdraw - Bologan will be a top replacement though for sure.

Thomas's picture

Funny that this is mentioned at German Chessbase but not yet at the tournament homepage. BTW wouldn't Dominguez be next in line?

redivivo's picture

It's now said that Carlsen will play the game Moro forfeited today, but against Bologan and on the rest day, which sounds strange to me. To begin with it's weird to replace a player in an ongoing tournament, but it's also strange to have a game that already has been forfeited played with another player in his place. Doesn't seem to be much point in having Carlsen play on the rest day against an opponent that won't play all games anyway, so it's not as if Bologan will win the tournament after playing a couple of games less than the others. And if Moro's first games count, how on earth can they also count Bologan's games in the same tournament table? It would be easier to just score all Moro's games as losses and skip the replacement.

Thomas's picture

Would you prefer if the spectators get to see only two games from now onwards, and Bacrot's and Giri's wins against Moro became irrelevant - either because three other players get three points, or because the results are deleted (though they would probably still be Elo-rated)?
Maybe Carlsen could have claimed a win by forfeit - it depends on whether the game was forfeited by Morozevich, or initially postponed by the organizers. But it's good news that he didn't.
As to Bologan, he accepted to play with two games less, and the other players approved his participation. Actually I wouldn't mind if he got two virtual draws for the rounds he missed (as in some Swiss opens where players can take a bye).
Finally, let's hope that Morozevich isn't too seriously ill: according to the tournament homepage, "the length of his healing process is unknown" which suggests that it's worse than just a flu - and might even prevent him from playing the Olympiad starting in about one month?

redivivo's picture

"Maybe Carlsen could have claimed a win by forfeit - it depends on whether the game was forfeited by Morozevich, or initially postponed by the organizers. But it's good news that he didn't."

It's strange though. Moro was supposed to play but didn't turn up. After the third round another player is called in as replacement, and he replaces Moro from before the third round. Even if they decided to call Moro's game "postponed" it is an entirely different player that is playing now, so it's not the game that was postponed that will be played, and Carlsen now has to play eight days in a row. Bologan is only playing for Elo anyway, so he shouldn't need to play a game from before he was included. Anyway I think Carlsen prefers playing Bologan rather than having that rest day so no big deal, but it's strange anyway since no player ever has been replaced in a tournament that already started, and there have been many similar occasions especially in the distant past.

Evgeny's picture

I really like the way Morozevitch plays, he is a real fighter. Especially I enjoy to follow his games live and seek for some interesting ideas. Also, I appreciate, that he avoids drawn positions in flavor of unclear and risky ones. Even if he can not recover from a loss so fast. He is clearly the one of the best players in the world!!! and he really belongs to it and deserves it.

Latest articles