Reports | February 16, 2012 10:12

Editor "Mat"eusz Bartel first on tie-break at Aeroflot Open

Editor "Mat"eusz Bartel first on tie-break at Aeroflot Open

Mateusz Bartel won the Aeroflot Open in Moscow, Russia. The Polish grandmaster edged out Ukrainians Anton Korobov and Pavel Eljanov on tie-break (most games with Black) after all three had finished on 6.5/9. Bartel is also the editor-in-chief of the Polish Chess Magazine Mat.

Mateusz Bartel of Poland in his last round game against Anton Korobov of Ukraine | Photo © Russian Chess Federation

Event Aeroflot Open | PGN via TWIC
Dates February 7th-15th, 2012 with a blitz tournament on February 16th, 2012
Location Moscow, Russia
System 9-round Swiss, different groups
Players Top players in the A group include  Evgeny Tomashevsky, Fabiano Caruana, Ian Nepomniachtchi, Le Quang Liem, Francisco Vallejo, Baadur Jobava,Krishnan Sasikiran and Pavel Eljanov
Rate of play in group A 100 minutes for 40 moves plus 50 minutes for 20 moves plus 15 minutes to finish the game, with an additional 30 second increment from move 1
Prize fund The total prize fund is 122,500 euro (or 150,000 euro if the blitz tournament afterwards is included) with a first priz in the A group of 20,000 euro. 
Tiebreaks For tournaments A and B: the number of games played with Black. Byes and forfeited games will be considered as games played with White. Then the average of the opponents' ratings minus the highest and the lowest rating. For tournament C: the Buchholz score
Previous reports

We'll pick up the tournament with round 7, when Anton Korobov was in sole lead with 5/6. The 26-year-old Ukrainian had to play his two years older compatriot Pavel Eljanov with Black in round 7, and lost:

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A small surprise was seen on board 2, where Mateusz Bartel of Poland not only managed to beat Fabiano Caruana, but only needed a mere 22 moves!

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In the penultimate round Bartel used the Dutch Defence to hold Pavel Eljanov to a draw. Korobov recovered with a black win versus Viorel Iordachescu of Moldavia.

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Caruana won another white game, against Bartosz Soćko of Poland.

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In the final round on Wednesday all games on the top boards ended in draws. Bartel again managed to draw his game with Black on board one.

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Eljanov drew with Dmitry Andreikin on two, and Caruana with Baadur Jobava on three. That game saw some nice tactics.

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This meant that Mateusz Bartel, Anton Korobov and Pavel Elljanov finished on 6.5/9. Bartel won the tournament on the first tie-break rule: number of games with Black - he was the only one with 5 Blacks and 4 Whites.

Mateusz Bartel

Mateusz Bartel | Photo: School of Agriculture, Warsaw

Interestingly, the Polish grandmaster told us that he's not only a chess player, but likes to write about chess as well.

Yes, I am chief editor of "Mat", a Polish chess magazine. GM Grzegorz Gajewski, IM Stanislaw Zawadzki and I created the magazine in 2009 and through 2009 and 2010 we were doing it by ourselves. Then we gave the magazine to the Polish Chess Federation, which is now the owner of "Mat". So, since January 2010 I am only chief editor. However, I mainly write articles that don't require so much time. For me it's like a hobby.

Bartel is a professional, but in the sense of a professional chess player, because he doesn't earn money being a chess journalist. He is the reigning Polish Champion, a title he won three times (2006, 2010 and 2011). He won several open and closed tournaments, but finishing first at the Aeroflot Open is obviously his biggest result so far.

The crucial moment of the tournament was my game versus Krishnan Sasikiran in round 6. Before that I was playing modestly, and Sasi had simply overplayed me. I was very lucky to avoid getting crushed and then eventually I managed to win. After that game my friend Bartosz Soćko told me that with such big amount of luck, I must win the tournament! It inspired me in the crucial rounds :-)

Bartel lives in Warsaw. For six years now, WGM Marta Przeździecka has been his girflriend. With his victory in Moscow, the Polish grandmaster qualified for the 40th Sparkassen Chess Meeting in Dortmund.

Well, it seems that yes, I have a place in Dortmund. It will be something special to me, to play such a strong tournament. Of course, I will be an underdog, but I hope I can show some good chess.

The prizes (1st € 20,000; 2nd € 10,000; 3rd € 7,000) were divived according to the 'Hort System'. This meant that the total amount of € 37,000 was first split into two equal parts of € 18,500. The first part was split equally, so each of the players received € 6166,67. The second part was split according to the ranking after tie-break: € 10,000, € 5,000 and € 3,500.

  1. Mateusz Bartel: € 10,000 + € 6,166.67 = € 16,166.67
  2. Anton Korobov: € 5,000 + € 6,166.67 =  € 11,166.67
  3. Pavel Eljanov: € 3,500 + € 6,166.67 = € 9,666.67 

Turkish grandmaster Emre Can dominated the B group. He started with 6/6 and three draws in the final rounds was enough to finish a full point ahead of a group of seven, and to claim the € 10,000 first prize.

Aeroflot Open 2012 | Group A | Round 9 (final) standings

Rank Name Score Fed. M/F Rating TPR W-We Col.Bal. Rat-HiLo
1 GM Bartel, Mateusz 6.5 POL M 2658 2822 +1.97 -1 2656.7
2 GM Korobov, Anton 6.5 UKR M 2660 2822 +1.94 1 2657.1
3 GM Eljanov, Pavel 6.5 UKR M 2690 2808 +1.41 1 2642.4
4 GM Khalifman, Alexander 6.0 RUS M 2632 2770 +1.67 -1 2650.9
5 GM Rodshtein, Maxim 6.0 ISR M 2634 2782 +1.80 1 2670.7
6 GM Caruana, Fabiano 6.0 ITA M 2736 2772 +0.41 1 2644.6
7 GM Melkumyan, Hrant 6.0 ARM M 2620 2757 +1.64 1 2637.3
8 GM Andreikin, Dmitry 6.0 RUS M 2688 2742 +0.61 1 2619.3
9 GM Sasikiran, Krishnan 5.5 IND M 2700 2704 +0.05 -1 2623.4
10 GM Bu, Xiangzhi 5.5 CHN M 2670 2692 +0.27 -1 2613.4
11 GM Tukhaev, Adam 5.5 UKR M 2537 2661 +1.55 -1 2595.3
12 GM Shomoev, Anton 5.5 RUS M 2570 2665 +1.19 -1 2592.0
13 GM Iordachescu, Viorel 5.5 MDA M 2651 2678 +0.34 -1 2590.0
14 GM Ragger, Markus 5.5 AUT M 2655 2640 -0.13 -1 2572.9
15 GM Zherebukh, Yaroslav 5.5 UKR M 2594 2749 +1.92 1 2679.3
16 GM Sokolov, Ivan 5.5 NED M 2641 2710 +0.88 1 2640.0
17 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 5.5 RUS M 2740 2705 -0.38 1 2638.1
18 GM Fedoseev, Vladimir 5.5 RUS M 2525 2710 +2.29 1 2629.4
19 GM Jobava, Baadur 5.5 GEO M 2704 2717 +0.16 1 2629.1
20 GM Popov, Ivan 5.5 RUS M 2599 2702 +1.29 1 2628.4
21 GM Alekseev, Evgeny 5.5 RUS M 2670 2701 +0.39 1 2623.1
22 IM Grigoryan, Karen H. 5.5 ARM M 2482 2664 +2.00 1 2618.6
23 GM Safarli, Eltaj 5.5 AZE M 2638 2696 +0.74 1 2616.9
24 GM Akopian, Vladimir 5.5 ARM M 2685 2674 -0.11 1 2592.3
25 GM Zhou, Jianchao 5.5 CHN M 2619 2669 +0.64 1 2583.4
26 GM Zhigalko, Andrey 5.0 BLR M 2576 2673 +1.16 -1 2638.0
27 GM Khismatullin, Denis 5.0 RUS M 2664 2649 -0.22 -1 2606.6
28 GM Salgado Lopez, Ivan 5.0 ESP M 2618 2642 +0.28 -1 2598.9
29 GM Kobalia, Mikhail 5.0 RUS M 2673 2615 -0.73 -1 2571.9
30 GM Ni, Hua 5.0 CHN M 2641 2602 -0.51 -1 2555.0
31 GM Rakhmanov, Aleksandr 5.0 RUS M 2593 2701 +1.31 1 2664.4
32 GM Esen, Baris 5.0 TUR M 2534 2712 +2.14 1 2664.4
33 GM Socko, Bartosz 5.0 POL M 2636 2681 +0.53 1 2645.7
34 GM Balogh, Csaba 5.0 HUN M 2665 2660 -0.11 1 2611.3
35 GM Zvjaginsev, Vadim 5.0 RUS M 2688 2649 -0.52 1 2611.0
36 GM Gupta, Abhijeet 5.0 IND M 2652 2653 -0.01 1 2607.7
37 GM Robson, Ray 4.5 USA M 2596 2634 +0.49 -1 2648.9
38 GM Bocharov, Dmitry 4.5 RUS M 2611 2633 +0.28 -1 2634.6
39 GM Grigoriants, Sergey 4.5 RUS M 2570 2606 +0.44 -1 2619.0
40 GM Nepomniachtchi, Ian 4.5 RUS M 2735 2595 -1.70 -1 2600.0
41 GM Khairullin, Ildar 4.5 RUS M 2638 2565 -0.90 -1 2549.9
42 GM Mamedov, Rauf 4.5 AZE M 2636 2535 -1.24 -1 2532.0
43 GM Gajewski, Grzegorz 4.5 POL M 2616 2647 +0.42 1 2669.9
44 GM Sethuraman, S.P. 4.5 IND M 2529 2655 +1.53 1 2649.4
45 GM Sjugirov, Sanan 4.5 RUS M 2622 2625 +0.06 1 2633.1
46 GM Zhigalko, Sergei 4.5 BLR M 2658 2620 -0.48 1 2620.6
47 GM Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter 4.5 ROU M 2647 2619 -0.36 1 2612.9
48 GM Dubov, Daniil 4.5 RUS M 2498 2601 +1.27 1 2605.4
49 GM Iturrizaga, Eduardo 4.5 VEN M 2649 2595 -0.66 1 2583.9
50 GM Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan 4.0 IRI M 2570 2587 +0.25 -1 2641.1
51 GM Ponkratov, Pavel 4.0 RUS M 2611 2574 -0.41 -1 2619.6
52 IM Gundavaa, Bayarsaikhan 4.0 MGL M 2493 2567 +0.91 -1 2612.1
53 GM Pap, Gyula 4.0 HUN M 2533 2571 +0.51 -1 2610.0
54 GM Alsina Leal, Daniel 4.0 ESP M 2535 2555 +0.27 -1 2608.3
55 GM Jumabayev, Rinat 4.0 KAZ M 2573 2558 -0.17 -1 2605.1
56 GM Le, Quang Liem 4.0 VIE M 2714 2552 -1.92 -1 2598.7
57 GM Vallejo Pons, Francisco 4.0 ESP M 2705 2550 -1.86 -1 2593.7
58 GM Negi, Parimarjan 4.0 IND M 2641 2542 -1.18 -1 2575.4
59 GM Solak, Dragan 4.0 TUR M 2613 2498 -1.36 -1 2542.9
60 GM Guseinov, Gadir 4.0 AZE M 2634 2483 -1.80 -1 2525.1
61 GM Ipatov, Alexander 4.0 TUR M 2586 2488 -1.18 -1 2518.7
62 IM Yilmaz, Mustafa 4.0 TUR M 2521 2590 +0.86 1 2630.1
63 WGM Ju, Wenjun 4.0 CHN F 2552 2587 +0.46 1 2628.4
64 IM Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi 4.0 IND M 2513 2581 +0.86 1 2626.0
65 GM Morovic Fernandez, Ivan 4.0 CHI M 2582 2540 -0.51 1 2577.0
66 GM Gopal G.N. 4.0 IND M 2566 2502 -0.74 1 2572.1
67 GM Sandipan, Chanda 4.0 IND M 2628 2518 -1.33 1 2552.4
68 GM Yu, Yangyi 4.0 CHN M 2631 2497 -1.60 1 2530.1
69 GM Harika, Dronavalli 3.5 IND F 2516 2508 -0.11 -1 2601.4
70 IM Venkatesh, M.R. 3.5 IND M 2499 2500 +0.00 -1 2581.6
71 IM Shyam, Sundar M. 3.5 IND M 2462 2493 +0.36 -1 2574.4
72 GM Jankovic, Alojzije 3.5 CRO M 2568 2476 -1.14 -1 2561.7
73 GM Adhiban, B. 3.5 IND M 2561 2553 -0.13 1 2627.3
74 GM Szabo, Krisztian 3.5 HUN M 2547 2462 -0.88 1 2596.6
75 GM Lu, Shanglei 3.5 CHN M 2516 2467 -0.50 1 2593.1
76 GM Bukavshin, Ivan 3.5 RUS M 2517 2419 -1.03 1 2549.6
77 GM Cori, Jorge 3.0 PER M 2489 2453 -0.44 -1 2579.0
78 WGM Shen, Yang 3.0 CHN F 2447 2369 -0.74 1 2554.7
79 GM Ulibin, Mikhail 3.0 RUS M 2587 2345 -2.54 1 2517.3
80 GM Pridorozhni, Aleksei 2.5 RUS M 2555 2384 -2.06 -1 2554.9
81 GM Savchenko, Boris 2.5 RUS M 2609 2394 -2.31 -1 2509.6
82 GM Bosiocic, Marin 2.5 CRO M 2580 2398 -2.21 1 2556.4
83 GM Al-Modiahki, Mohamad 2.5 QAT M 2567 2363 -2.48 1 2527.0
84 GM Aleksandrov, Aleksej 2.0 BLR M 2612 2660 +0.26 5 2632.7
85 WGM Paikidze, Nazi 1.5 GEO F 2411 2297 -1.12 1 2569.1
86 GM Inarkiev, Ernesto 0.0 RUS M 2689 0 +0.00 9 0.0

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

columbo's picture

Congrats to Bartel, a very solid player, and pleasure to watch his games ! Terrible coverage of Caruana's game yesterday ! I thought he had a winning game

Thomas's picture

Congrats to Bartel, but I feel soory for Korobov - if tiebreak ever was a lottery then this time: It all depended on who got "the advantage of the black pieces" in their last-round game - unless one assumes that Bartel would have won with the white pieces.
Their TPRs were exactly the same, while Korobov spent a bit more time on the very top boards. The Dortmund organizers can (IMO should) invite both of them, which would reduce the injustice to the 5000€ difference in prize money - still not exactly peanuts.

mishanp's picture

Well, but Korobov had won all of his four games with White before the final round, while he had 2 draws, a loss and a win with Black. So although I agree it's preferable only to need a draw it was very balanced. Also on opponents - Korobov and Bartel played the same top players: Tomashevsky, Caruana and Eljanov, while Bartel also played Sasikiran (2700).

Obviously it would be nice if Dortmund could invite Korobov and Eljanov as well, but obviously that wouldn't make sense in a 6-player supertournament (unless they've run out of money).

Popeye's picture

if Korobov had won, you could have talked about "the advantage of white pieces". It was like an Armagedon but with same time control... There's no perfect tie-break, but I still prefer this one to SB. And if they were asked before the tournament if they prefered to play 5 white games or 5 with black, I guess both would have said "white". So I don't see where is the injustice to play the last game with white!
Both deserve credit but you need a winner

Thomas's picture

As the players knew that "most games with black" is the first tiebreaker, I wouldn't be that sure whether they prefer an extra white. Actually in the given situation color balance may still be a better tiebreaker than average rating of opponents favoring Korobov (2657.1) over Bartel (2656.7) ... .
"but you need a winner" - well, what for? The trophy cannot be split, the Dortmund invitation cannot be split, but does the considerable difference in prize money make sense?
BTW (it probably won't happen but) one way for Dortmund to accomodate several (almost-)qualifiers would be to expand the field - cf. the 2008 edition with eight participants: regulars Kramnik and Leko, other 2700ers Mamedyarov and Ivanchuk, two German wildcards (Naiditsch and Gusstafsson), Aeroflot qualifier Nepomniachtchi (2634 at the time) and van Wely (2676). A bit "London-style"!? Actually - with the exception of van Wely's 1/7 score - the underdogs did rather well: all scored at least 50% and finished ahead of Kramnik who had a bad year in Dortmund (3/7).

Anonymous's picture

Brawo Mateusz, i powodzenia w drodze do 2700! Congrats and good luck in the way for 2700 ranking

Axel Müller's picture

Congrats to Bartel! I feel sorry for Korobov too though. While Popeye has a point I also agree with Thomas: I hope the Dortmund organizers also invite Korobov.

Niima's picture

Thanks Peter for covering the prize fund and who made how much. It is not done enough and interesting to know.

nickeur's picture

I think also it's nice to see the prize fund of any tournaments.
Thanks

redivivo's picture

It's a big advantage to have an extra white so I think the tiebreak is sensible and that Bartel was a very deserving winner. Eljanov also scored 6.5 but a Dortmund with Bartel, Korobov, Naiditsch, Leko and Eljanov together with Kramnik would look weak. I'd prefer some players like Morozevich and Mamedyarov for the two remaining spots. Carlsen and Aronian are playing so many top tournaments anyway so it could be fun with some of the 2750+ players that aren't invited to the biggest tournaments as often.

Patrick's picture

Carlsen will probably not be playing in Dortmund this year (so he told me during the pea soup dinner in Wijk aan Zee two weeks ago).

Geof's picture

Congratulations to Bartel. It's also nice to see Khalifman have a good tournament.

nathan's picture

Terrible tournament for Nepomniachtchi, Paco and especially Le Quang who drops below 2700 once again.
Yu Yangyi, who is same age as Yifan, and been higher rated, may have fallen below her after this tournament!

rajeshv's picture

Congrats to Bartel!! He made that turnaround against Sasi count! Good for him!

Szoker's picture

GZ !!! :D big victory ;)

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