Reports | November 07, 2011 18:44

Four winners in Bad Wiessee

Four winners in Bad Wiessee

The Bad Wiessee Open was probably the strongest Swiss Open of this fall season. Among the 460 participants were 32 GMs, with an interesting mix of young rising stars and experienced players. In the end, first place was shared between two "old" players Alexander Graf and Robert Kempinski, and two young ones, Parimarjan Negi and Sergei Zhigalko. Graf had the best Buchholz tiebreak.

Photo © OIBM Bad Wiessee

Event 15th Open Bavarian Championship
Dates October 29th-November 6th, 2011
Location Bad Wiessee, Germany
System 9-round Swiss
Players Top rated players were GMs Sergei Zhigalko, Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu, Parimarjan Negi, Alexander Graf, Igor Khenkin, Vladimir Baklan, Sergey Volkov, Tomasz Markowski, Robert Kempinski, Dariusz Swiercz and Ulf Andersson
Rate of play 90 minutes for the first 40 moves and then 30 minutes to finish the game, with 30 seconds increment from move 1
   

The first round already saw a big surprise when the 56-year old German amateur Georg Kwossek beat experienced GM Eduardas Rozentalis. Black had an advantage from an unconventional opening, but then Rozentalis probably underestimated the white kingside attack. Within two moves (18...d5?, 19...dc4?) his position was lost.

PGN string

Everyone surely enjoys a move like 25.Rg8+, particularly against an opponent who is more than 500 points higher-rated. After the game, Kwossek commented: "He made my day!" Like Dutch GM Sipke Ernst in Hoogeveen, Rozentalis subsequently scored 7/8, but this wasn't enough to join the fight for first place.

Later GM Hertneck lost in similar style against 17-year-old local talent Maximilian Berchtenbreiter. Berchtenbreiter also beat GM Kunin and obtained his third IM norm, but still needs to reach Elo 2400.

This time, Sipke Ernst had a better start. After 5 rounds, he, Alexander Graf and young Indian Baskaran Adhiban were the only remaining players with a clean 5/5 score. Draws in the next two rounds allowed 10 other players to catch up with them, and then the tournament entered its decisive phase.

In round 8, Graf regained the lead beating Polish talent Dariusz Swiercz with the black pieces in a Ruy Lopez. All other games aon the top boards were drawn, even though Adhiban tried to win a queen ending until move 110.

PGN string

Swiercz's kingside attack never got going; Graf eventually gained a pawn due to the awkward placement of the white pieces and converted his advantage.

In the final round, Graf secured at least shared first place with a quick draw against Nisipeanu. Three other players could join him:

Top seed Sergei Zhigalko beat young Ukrainian Illya Nyzhnyk in a poisoned pawn Sicilian. White obtained two pawns for the exchange; in the endgame the kingside passed pawns turned out to be decisive.

PGN string

The Indian players Negi and Adhiban didn't spare each other at all; the younger and nominally stronger one was chasing the black king all the way to b4. This meant that Adhiban, who was leading for most of the tournament, fell back to 21st place.

PGN string

Polish GM Robert Kempinski had the supposedly easiest task as he was paired against 14-year old German talent Dennis Wagner. From the opening, he reached a favorable endgame (or maybe rather queenless middlegame) which he converted convincingly.

PGN string

Maybe the funniest game – but not for the GM who lost it – was played in round 8 between Michael Stockmann and Gerald Hertneck. Black had a slight advantage throughout the game and then the following position was reached on move 38.

PGN string

Bavaria Open | Final standings (top 30)

No. Name Nat. FIDE Punkte Buchh Opp
1. Graf, Alexander 2597 2628 7.5 54.5 2420
2. Negi, Parimarjan 2651 2631 7.5 53.0 2393
3. Kempinski, Robert 2575 2604 7.5 53.0 2334
4. Zhigalko, Sergei 2696 2696 7.5 51.0 2410
5. Nisipeanu, Liviu- 2638 2638 7.0 56.5 2409
6. Markowski, Tomasz 2607 2607 7.0 56.5 2356
7. Ernst, Sipke 2560 2581 7.0 56.0 2384
8. Eingorn, Vereslav 2567 2567 7.0 56.0 2318
9. Sokolov, Andrei 2560 2519 7.0 55.5 2378
10. Volkov, Sergey 2614 2614 7.0 54.5 2384
11. Lenderman,Aleksan 2562 2562 7.0 54.5 2356
12. Baklan, Vladimir 2596 2617 7.0 54.5 2353
13. Khenkin, Igor 2630 2624 7.0 54.0 2322
14. Zhigalko, Andrey 2555 2555 7.0 53.5 2278
15. Krivoborodov,Egor 2505 2505 7.0 52.5 2304
16. Teske, Henrik 2514 2547 7.0 52.0 2247
17. Mainka,Romuald 2424 2488 7.0 51.5 2219
18. Zude, Arno 2364 2431 7.0 50.5 2225
19. Kummerow, Heiko 2261 2347 7.0 49.5 2215
20. Rozentalis, Eduar 2575 2575 7.0 48.0 2185
21. Adhiban,B 2551 2551 6.5 58.0 2394
22. Nyzhnyk, Illja 2561 2561 6.5 57.5 2380
23. Naumann, Alexande 2522 2546 6.5 54.0 2250
24. Bromberger,Stefan 2485 2511 6.5 53.5 2258
25. Zakhartsov, Viach 2580 2580 6.5 52.5 2320
26. Meins, Gerlef 2456 2490 6.5 52.0 2244
27. Jakubiec,Artur 2528 2528 6.5 51.5 2316
28. Lund, Silas 2380 2380 6.5 51.0 2247
29. Pezerovic,Edin 2418 2455 6.5 51.0 2227
30. Andersson, Ulf 2569 2582 6.5 51.0 2202

 

Thomas Richter's picture
Author: Thomas Richter
Chess.com

Comments

Wiebe's picture

It's great and strong event for sure, but the strongest is probably the Chigorin memorial.

Thomas Richter's picture

Thanks - yep I had forgotten about or missed Chigorin Memorial which took place 12-22 October. It got little coverage from western chess media, but there is a report at TWIC.

I would say Chigorin Memorial was comparable to, and indeed a bit stronger than Bad Wiessee. But the Bad Wiessee field was more diverse: Chigorin Memorial was essentially a Russian (to "Soviet") event.

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