Reports | December 07, 2009 5:07

Gelfand beats Karjakin on first day semi-finals

On the first day of the World Cup's semi-finals Boris Gelfand delivered a big blow to his 22 years younger opponent Sergey Karjakin. The Israeli grandmaster continued his fantastic World Cup tournament with a win with the black pieces today, and only needs a draw with White tomorrow to reach the final. The game Ponomariov-Malakhov ended in a draw.

The FIDE World Chess Cup takes place November 20th-December 15th inn Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It's a seven-round knockout with six rounds of matches comprising two games per round. The final seventh round consists of four games.

Round 1 (November 21-23): 128 players Round 5 (December 3-5): 8 players
Round 2 (November 24-26): 64 players Round 6 (December 6-8): 4 players
Round 3 (November 27-29): 32 players Round 7 (December 10-14): 2 players
Round 4 (November 30-December 2): 16 players


The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move from move one. Games start at 15:00h local time (11:00 CET).

Results round 6

World Cup 2009 | Results round 6

Round 6, day 1

Boris Gelfand is playing very, very strongly in Khanty-Mansiysk. The ease with which he set aside Dimitry Jakovenko yesterday in the tiebreaks of the quarter-finals was impressive, and today he came with an excellent follow-up: a win with the black pieces against Sergey Karjakin.

Already on move 11 Gelfand sacrificed a piece, but accepting it would be too dangerous:


11...Ra6!?
Now 12.Bxd5 Qxd5 13.Rxe7 Rg6 14.g4 f5 and White is playing with fire. However, just a few moves later Black got his attack anyway, thanks to a strong pawn sac.


18.Bxd6? cxd6! 19.Qxd4 Qg5 and Black's attack was so strong that Karjakin could only avoid mate by giving back three pawns, which of course was too much.

Where many other GMs failed as well in the earlier rounds of this World Cup, Ponomariov couldn't get anything tangible either against Malakhov's Chebanenko Slav. White's endgame advantage was only a theoretical one as it was impossible to profit from Black's isolated pawns on the kingside.

All photos by Galina Popova | courtesy of FIDE

ChessVibes LiveTomorrow at 11:00 CET is the second and last classical game of the semi-finals and again we'll have live commentary. (You can still replay GM Sipke Ernst's annotations on the live page until the new round starts.) We're covering the World Cup and the London Chess Classic for free; starting from 2010 our live commentary will be subscription-based. You'll find more info here.

Games round 6, day 1

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup - Pairings & results rounds 2-7

Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
 
Shabalov (2606)
  Navara (2707)
Navara (2707)  
Karjakin (2723)
Karjakin (2723)    
  Karjakin (2723)    
Timofeev (2651)  
Karjakin (2723)
Sakaev (2626)    
  Sakaev (2626)    
Radjabov (2748)      
Vitiugov (2694)    
Vitiugov (2694)    
  Vitiugov (2694)    
Milos (2603)  
Karjakin (2723)
Cheparinov (2671)    
  Bologan (2692)    
Bologan (2692)      
Laznicka (2637)    
Morozevich (2750)        
  Laznicka (2637)        
Laznicka (2637)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Milov (2652)    
  Mamedyarov (2719)    
Mamedyarov (2719)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Wang Hao (2708)    
  Wang Hao (2708)    
Ganguly (2654)  
Meier (2653)  
  Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)    
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Yu Yangyi (2527)      
  Yu Yangyi (2527)      
Bartel (2618)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Amonatov (2631)      
  Gelfand (2758)      
Gelfand (2758)        
Gelfand (2758)      
Polgar (2680)      
  Polgar (2680)      
Nisipeanu (2677)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Iturrizaga (2605)  
  Jobava (2696)  
Jobava (2696)    
Grischuk (2736)  
Grischuk (2736)      
  Grischuk (2736)      
Tkachiev (2642)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Sandipan (2623)  
  Jakovenko (2736)  
Jakovenko (2736)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Rublevsky (2697)  
  Areshchenko (2664)  
Areshchenko (2664)
 
Sasikiran (2664)
  Bacrot (2700)
Bacrot (2700)  
Bacrot (2700)
Wang Yue (2734)    
  Wang Yue (2734)    
Savchenko (2644)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Akobian (2624)    
  Ponomariov (2739)    
Ponomariov (2739)      
Ponomariov (2739)    
Motylev (2695)    
  Motylev (2695)    
Najer (2695  
Ponomariov (2739)
Li Chao (2596)    
  Li Chao (2596)    
Pelletier (2589)      
Gashimov (2758)    
Gashimov (2758)        
  Gashimov (2758)        
Zhou Jianchao (2629      
Gashimov (2758)    
Caruana (2652)    
  Caruana (2652)    
Dominguez (2719)      
Caruana (2652)    
Alekseev (2715)    
  Alekseev (2715)    
Fressinet (2653)  
Khalifman (2612)  
  Tomashevsky (2708)  
Tomashevsky (2708)    
Shirov (2719)  
Shirov (2719)      
  Shirov (2719)      
Fedorchuk (2619)    
Svidler (2754)  
Nyback (2628)      
  Svidler (2754)      
Svidler (2754)        
Svidler (2754)      
Naiditsch (2689)      
  Naiditsch (2689)      
Onischuk (2672)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Zhou Weiqi (2603)  
  Kamsky (2695)  
Kamsky (2695)    
So (2640)  
Ivanchuk (2739)      
  So (2640)      
So (2640)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Inarkiev (2645)  
  Eljanov (2729)  
Eljanov (2729)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Malakhov (2706)  
  Malakhov (2706)  
Smirin (2662)



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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

ops's picture

polgar did it better with bishop opening. 12.Bxd5 leads to draw look twic comment.

Castro's picture

I tried several times, but always the same result: On chessvibes/live I just see part of the board (namely, only ranges 6-7-8), and the anotations are also cropped at that same "latitude".
Do you know what can be happening?

PP (NL)'s picture

Nice play by Gelfand! Very impressive.

Was 11... Ra6 a novelty?

Solomon's picture

How can you have a best of 3 for the semi finals? Does this mean Karjakin is already lost becuase of his one loss? This is no way to decide a World Champion. Might as well flip coins. Semi finals ought to be at least a best of fives. IMHO.

gg's picture

TWIC writes that black must be a lot better after 11. ... Ra6 and immediately continues with saying that 12. Bxd5 leads to a draw. Can black really be a lot better in a position if it's drawn with best play?!

mi_di's picture

Castro: I had a similar problem, I had to update my firefox, and works now

Nakamura fan's picture

Gelfand is the 6th best player in the world.

Muadhib's picture

Bloddy hell, why do people still think that this KO decides about World Champion, or about the next challenger???

Can't they just investigate a bit before commenting something they obviously don't have a clue about?

Georgios Souleidis's picture

Karjakin obviously was not familiar with this line. It´s much better to play 8. Re1 than 8. h3. 12. Bxd5 seems to draw quite forced. After 12. Qh5?! it is quite impossible to hold the position in a practical game. I have some experience with this line and analyzed the game.

guncha's picture

I looks Russian coaches give right advices to Karjakin...
I looks the knowledge of Sergei ended before 10th move yesterday - a great achievement in computer era...

Buri's picture

Karjakin went down in flames today!!!! lol

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