Reports | December 15, 2009 1:16

Gelfand wins FIDE World Cup 2009

Boris Gelfand won the FIDE World Cup. He defeated Ruslan Ponomariov today in the tiebreak of the final, needing four rapid games and four blitz games to decide matters. The Israeli Grandmaster cashed US$ 120,000 (net 96,000) while Ponomariov takes home US$ 80,000 (net 64,000).

The FIDE World Chess Cup takes place November 20th-December 15th inn Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It's a seven-round knockout with six rounds of matches comprising two games per round. The final seventh round consists of four games and will be played December 10th-14th. The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move from move one. Games start at 15:00h local time (11:00 CET).


Results of the final

World Cup 2009 | Results round 7



Tiebreak

After four rather uninteresting classical games, we had a nail-biting tiebreak today that decided the winner of the World Cup. In the first rapid game Ponomariov got a tiny plus in an endgame with bishop versus knight, but Gelfand held it. Then Gelfand won a nice second game, after which a shaky 3rd one ended in a draw. Ponomariov had to win game 4, and he did, with the black pieces!

In the first blitz games Gelfand immediately took the lead with a crushing victory that only lasted 21 moves when Black's queen was trapped. Ponomariov then struck back with a very nice attacking game that involved an exchange sacrifice, but then spoilt the 3rd game with some unforced errors. Again he had to win to stay in the match, and this time he had White, but this time he didn't succeed. A crucial moment was move 23, where Ponomariov miscalculated. Gelfand got an advantage and never let go.

Boris Gelfand was the top seed, and the deserved winner. He played the most convincing chess in Khanty-Mansiysk, showing excellent preparation and making almost no mistakes in the whole event. He's won a nice sum of money, a spot in the Candidates and as we learnt today he'll now probably be invited to Linares as well.

ChessVibes LiveYou can replay IM Merijn van Delft's annotations from the live page below in the game viewer. We're covering the World Cup and the London Chess Classic for free; starting from 2010 our live commentary will be subscription-based. You'll find more info here.

Tiebreak games

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup - Pairings & results rounds 2-7

Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
 
Shabalov (2606)
  Navara (2707)
Navara (2707)  
Karjakin (2723)
Karjakin (2723)    
  Karjakin (2723)    
Timofeev (2651)  
Karjakin (2723)
Sakaev (2626)    
  Sakaev (2626)    
Radjabov (2748)      
Vitiugov (2694)    
Vitiugov (2694)    
  Vitiugov (2694)    
Milos (2603)  
Karjakin (2723)
Cheparinov (2671)    
  Bologan (2692)    
Bologan (2692)      
Laznicka (2637)    
Morozevich (2750)        
  Laznicka (2637)        
Laznicka (2637)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Milov (2652)    
  Mamedyarov (2719)    
Mamedyarov (2719)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Wang Hao (2708)    
  Wang Hao (2708)    
Ganguly (2654)  
Gelfand (2758)
Meier (2653)  
  Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)    
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Yu Yangyi (2527)      
  Yu Yangyi (2527)      
Bartel (2618)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Amonatov (2631)      
  Gelfand (2758)      
Gelfand (2758)        
Gelfand (2758)      
Polgar (2680)      
  Polgar (2680)      
Nisipeanu (2677)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Iturrizaga (2605)  
  Jobava (2696)  
Jobava (2696)    
Grischuk (2736)  
Grischuk (2736)      
  Grischuk (2736)      
Tkachiev (2642)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Sandipan (2623)  
  Jakovenko (2736)  
Jakovenko (2736)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Rublevsky (2697)  
  Areshchenko (2664)  
Areshchenko (2664)
 
Sasikiran (2664)
  Bacrot (2700)
Bacrot (2700)  
Bacrot (2700)
Wang Yue (2734)    
  Wang Yue (2734)    
Savchenko (2644)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Akobian (2624)    
  Ponomariov (2739)    
Ponomariov (2739)      
Ponomariov (2739)    
Motylev (2695)    
  Motylev (2695)    
Najer (2695  
Ponomariov (2739)
Li Chao (2596)    
  Li Chao (2596)    
Pelletier (2589)      
Gashimov (2758)    
Gashimov (2758)        
  Gashimov (2758)        
Zhou Jianchao (2629      
Gashimov (2758)    
Caruana (2652)    
  Caruana (2652)    
Dominguez (2719)      
Caruana (2652)    
Alekseev (2715)    
  Alekseev (2715)    
Fressinet (2653)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Khalifman (2612)  
  Tomashevsky (2708)  
Tomashevsky (2708)    
Shirov (2719)  
Shirov (2719)      
  Shirov (2719)      
Fedorchuk (2619)    
Svidler (2754)  
Nyback (2628)      
  Svidler (2754)      
Svidler (2754)        
Svidler (2754)      
Naiditsch (2689)      
  Naiditsch (2689)      
Onischuk (2672)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Zhou Weiqi (2603)  
  Kamsky (2695)  
Kamsky (2695)    
So (2640)  
Ivanchuk (2739)      
  So (2640)      
So (2640)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Inarkiev (2645)  
  Eljanov (2729)  
Eljanov (2729)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Malakhov (2706)  
  Malakhov (2706)  
Smirin (2662)



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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

Harish Srinivasan's picture

120,000 usd is not much I would say. The prize money for winning Linares or bilbao masters (and may be for other tourneys) this year was higher and also linares (and other top invitationals) pays appearance fees and travel.

considering that the world cup is supposed to be a top event from fide perspective and it happens only once in 2 yrs, the prize money is very small.

Radical Caveman's picture

In that case, since the money is so insignificant, Gelfand can just give it to me. :)

Muadhib's picture

It's 96.000 $ not 120.000 $. But with this win, he also gets to play the Candidates and that brings money too. Also the "title" gets him more invitations to prestigious tournaments (just today he was supposingly invited to Linares). So this win is worth much more than just 96.000 $ that he will get in Khanty Mansiysk.

The line-up for Candidates is getting longer:
- loser of Anand vs. Topalov
- Kamsky
- Aronian
- Carlsen
- Kramnik
- Gelfand

Only 2 spots left - runner-up in Grand Prix, and a host nominee.

Coco Loco's picture

Congratulations to Gelfand! Impressive stuff.

jan van der marel's picture

Nice for Gelfand, but it's a disgrace that the WCC is decided in a rapid/blitz match!

Ben's picture

Congratulations, Gelfand!

That candidates tournament is likely to eclipse Mexico (where Anand won, with the right to challenge Kramnik) as the most elite event ever. To tell the truth, I am looking forward to it more than the WC match.

I hope Ivanchuk can secure runner-up status. As for the invite, first dibs for many reasons should go to Kasparov, but assuming he declines it, the field is wide open. Any of Radjabov, Gashimov, Yue, Mamedyarov, Svidler, Leko, Ponomariov, and others are fine choices, but I would give it to Morozevich by virtue of his having been #1 in the world briefly in 2008 during this past cycle.

DrTom's picture

Congratulations to Gelfand of course, but I would like to add as a comment here :
I've never seen a player with such IRON NERVES as the ones Ponomariov showed, in his games against Gelfand, Malakhov, etc.
He should be invited to more elite events, he was truly impressive both "chess-wise" and "mental-wise" throughout the event.
From this I've learnt one shall never bluff against an Ukranian player : he'd go straight for your throat.

Luis's picture

Congratulations Gelfand!

And congratulations Chess Vibes for the Live Commentary, nice effort!

Though I still think there are a few issues you should improve... ;-)

Muadhib's picture

In Mexico Anand won the title! It was Kramnik who had the privilege to play a World Championship match against him and not the other way around.

It's the host (Azerbaijan?) who nominates one player. So it will certainly not be Morozevich, Wany Yue, Leko, etc. It will be either Gashimov, Radjabov or Mamedyarov. Gashimov and Radjabov can still qualify through Grand Prix.

CAL|Daniel's picture

Congrats to Gelfand. I wonder is this one of the few times in a knockout event that top seed actually finished on top?

It would be a disgrace is Azerbaijan nominates Mamedyarov. Lets also not forget that at the time of the nomination the player in question is required to be over 2700 so this limits their possibilities as well.

Muadhib's picture

Certain Viswanathan Anand won it twice in 1997 and 2000, both times as #1 seed ;)

Why would be Mamedyarov's nomination a disgrace??? You can't possibly still be moaning about the "Kornusov case", do you?

Thomas's picture

@CALDaniel: I think (but am not completely sure) that the wildcard has to be >2700 on the upcoming January 2010 list, which will closely resemble the current live rating list. There we have Gashimov (2758.8), Mamedyarov (2741.3) and Radjabov (2733.4). Until recently, there was a chance that one qualifies via the World Cup, another one via the GP, and the third one gets the wildcard - now the Azeri organizers will, in any case, have to make a difficult choice ... .

Regarding Mamedyarov, I tend to agree with you. On the other hand, to my knowledge this (Kurnusov) was the only incident in his career ... .

Michael's picture

I don't know why, but in the pre-tournament poll only very few people predicted Boris Gelfand as the winner of the World Cup . I was one of them :-)

vasil's picture

Congratulations Boris,
you got what you deserved!
Best wishes for future success!
I also get pleasure from the fact that an above 40 man
(like me) can still do it.
An Israeli fan.

Tandil Ajedrez's picture

congratz! israel have one winner now!!!

CAL|Daniel's picture

In fact, I was inspired to check for my own answer.
This is only the second time EVER that the top seed has finished on top in Knockout events (the first being Anand in 2000). Anand was second seed when he finished on top in 1997. So a major congrats to Gelfand is in order as this seems to be quite rare!

Muadhib's picture

In 1997 he was 2nd seed only techically - Kramnik (#1 seed) pulled out shortly before the tournament start and did not play at all. Thats why Anand was 1st seed in 1997 also.

Carl Enz's picture

GELFAND WINS!! I KNEW it !!!!

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