Reports | December 05, 2009 1:16

Karjakin and Malakhov reach semi-finals

All four games ended in draws on the second day of round 5, and so Sergei Karjakin and Vladimir Malakhov are through to the semi-finals of the World Cup, and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov and Peter Svidler are out. Gelfand, Jakovenko, Ponomariov and Gashimov will play tiebreaks tomorrow.

The FIDE World Chess Cup takes place November 20th-December 15th inn Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It's a seven-round knockout with six rounds of matches comprising two games per round. The final seventh round consists of four games.

Round 1 (November 21-23): 128 players Round 5 (December 3-5): 8 players
Round 2 (November 24-26): 64 players Round 6 (December 6-8): 4 players
Round 3 (November 27-29): 32 players Round 7 (December 10-14): 2 players
Round 4 (November 30-December 2): 16 players


The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move from move one. Games start at 15:00h local time (11:00 CET).

Results round 5

World Cup 2009 | Results round 5

Round 5, day 2

About both Jakovenko-Gelfand and Gashimov-Ponomariov we can keep it short: to very short draws, and so apparently all four GMs had no intention to take any risk today. These four players will decide in tomorrow's final who will have to leave, and who will reach the semis.

A quick draw in Gashimov-Ponomariov (and in Jakovenko-Gelfand)

What's the best opening against 1.Nf3/1.d4 in a a must-win situation? It might well be the King's Indian, and that's what Svidler went for. To avoid the Exchange Variation he then chose the set-up with 6...Nbd7, which has the downside that it's more passive than the main lines.

Peter Svidler, still somewhat surprisingly eliminated in just two games...

Malakhov did trade pawns on e5 at an early stage, and with strong moves like 19.a4, 22.b3 and 27.Nxe5! he gave his opponent absolutely no chance to complicate matters. In fact, in the final position White is still better.

...by his very strong compatriot Vladimir Malakhov

Mamedyarov also had to win, but he was playing the white pieces. And indeed, the Azeri GM got his chances. Well, it might have been just one chance, but a golden one. In the following position it's quite strange that he didn't just take on d5 with the knight. What would he have missed?

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov is out

Tomorrow's tiebreaks will give us the names of the other two semi-finalists and then on Sunday those semi-finals already start.

All photos by Galina Popova | courtesy of FIDE

Games round 5, day 2

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup - Pairings & results rounds 2-7

Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
 
Shabalov (2606)
  Navara (2707)
Navara (2707)  
Karjakin (2723)
Karjakin (2723)    
  Karjakin (2723)    
Timofeev (2651)  
Karjakin (2723)
Sakaev (2626)    
  Sakaev (2626)    
Radjabov (2748)      
Vitiugov (2694)    
Vitiugov (2694)    
  Vitiugov (2694)    
Milos (2603)  
Karjakin (2723)
Cheparinov (2671)    
  Bologan (2692)    
Bologan (2692)      
Laznicka (2637)    
Morozevich (2750)        
  Laznicka (2637)        
Laznicka (2637)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Milov (2652)    
  Mamedyarov (2719)    
Mamedyarov (2719)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Wang Hao (2708)    
  Wang Hao (2708)    
Ganguly (2654)  
Meier (2653)  
  Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)    
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Yu Yangyi (2527)      
  Yu Yangyi (2527)      
Bartel (2618)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Amonatov (2631)      
  Gelfand (2758)      
Gelfand (2758)        
Gelfand (2758)      
Polgar (2680)      
  Polgar (2680)      
Nisipeanu (2677)    
 
Iturrizaga (2605)  
  Jobava (2696)  
Jobava (2696)    
Grischuk (2736)  
Grischuk (2736)      
  Grischuk (2736)      
Tkachiev (2642)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Sandipan (2623)  
  Jakovenko (2736)  
Jakovenko (2736)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Rublevsky (2697)  
  Areshchenko (2664)  
Areshchenko (2664)
 
Sasikiran (2664)
  Bacrot (2700)
Bacrot (2700)  
Bacrot (2700)
Wang Yue (2734)    
  Wang Yue (2734)    
Savchenko (2644)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Akobian (2624)    
  Ponomariov (2739)    
Ponomariov (2739)      
Ponomariov (2739)    
Motylev (2695)    
  Motylev (2695)    
Najer (2695  
Li Chao (2596)    
  Li Chao (2596)    
Pelletier (2589)      
Gashimov (2758)    
Gashimov (2758)        
  Gashimov (2758)        
Zhou Jianchao (2629      
Gashimov (2758)    
Caruana (2652)    
  Caruana (2652)    
Dominguez (2719)      
Caruana (2652)    
Alekseev (2715)    
  Alekseev (2715)    
Fressinet (2653)  
Khalifman (2612)  
  Tomashevsky (2708)  
Tomashevsky (2708)    
Shirov (2719)  
Shirov (2719)      
  Shirov (2719)      
Fedorchuk (2619)    
Svidler (2754)  
Nyback (2628)      
  Svidler (2754)      
Svidler (2754)        
Svidler (2754)      
Naiditsch (2689)      
  Naiditsch (2689)      
Onischuk (2672)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Zhou Weiqi (2603)  
  Kamsky (2695)  
Kamsky (2695)    
So (2640)  
Ivanchuk (2739)      
  So (2640)      
So (2640)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Inarkiev (2645)  
  Eljanov (2729)  
Eljanov (2729)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Malakhov (2706)  
  Malakhov (2706)  
Smirin (2662)



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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

unknown's picture

Malakhov - Gashimov
Gelfand - Karjakin

=>

Malakhov - Karjakin

=>

Karjakin

ron's picture

Yes, after the top 5 Karjakin is maybe the "best of the rest".

pinheadpawn's picture

svidler out, good, he only takes space and plays boring chess. all the remaining players are interesting to watch.

Castro's picture

Go Boris!! :-)

Pam's picture

I think the final will be:

Gelfand vs Gashimov

T. Goto's picture

This time, it seems KO system worked in favor of players with 'solid' styles. At this point, everyone has a chance and it's the matter of who makes the last decisive mistake. An interesting factor is that everybody knows each other in this group, except Malakhov. But he knows their games. That might play a role in the outcome.

Nakamura fan's picture

@ Ron "Yes, after the top 5 Karjakin is maybe the “best of the rest”.

Ever heard of Vassily Ivanchuk?

CAL|Daniel's picture

Final is Pono vs Karjakin...

Boybawang's picture

I have strange feeling that Malakhov will win this

chris's picture

More a question of good luck than being better.

Their individual rating variations over the last year or two are greater than the rating differences between the 6 remaining players. For example, Gelfand was 2719 just over a year ago while Jakovenko has been as high as 2760 on 2 lists this year. Malakhov's live rating is 2715.

The rating differences are small enough to be insignificant - particularly over a sample as small as 2 games. (& what are the rapid & blitz ratings for each player ?)

I'm sad to see Svidler go, but I loved Malakhov's underpromotion.

Nakamura fan's picture

Gelfand and Ponomariov win.

Jens Kristiansen's picture

Yes, it is great that they play in this KO-way just now and then, but hopefully not all the time.
By the way, what has happened to Afek´s endgame studies? We are still a few that are eager to see the solution to the last puzzle with all these passed pawn.

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