Reports | May 10, 2013 19:59

Karjakin wins again in Norway, Anand and Radjabov score as well

Karjakin wins again in Norway, Anand and Radjabov score as well

Sergey Karjakin also won his third game at the Norway Chess tournament in Sandnes. The Russian grandmaster defeated Wang Hao in a Rauzer Sicilian in which his bishop pair became stronger and stronger. World Champion Viswanathan Anand scored an excellent victory in a Sicilian Najdorf against Veselin Topalov while Teimour Radjabov won his first game as well; the Azerbaijani inflicted the third consecutive loss upon Jon Ludvig Hammer. Saturday is a rest day.

In yet another splendid round, the chess fans in the playing hall and over the internet were treated with no less than two Open Sicilians, even a Vienna Opening, and, for the third time in a row, three decisive games. Sergey Karjakin just keeps on winning and winning on Norwegian soil: first the blitz and then his first three real games. The Muscovite now has a full point ahead of the two A's in this event: Levon Aronian and Vishy Anand.

The World Champion's play against Veselin Topalov reminded of the many great 1.e4 wins he has scored in his career. Not shying away from Najdorf theory, the two contestants of the 2010 World Championship match in Sofia followed a game Leko-Anand from Wijk aan Zee this year. Although that ended in a draw quickly, Topalov decided to deviate anyway on move 16 (or was he mixing up the move order?).

White lost his pawn on d5, but the difference with that earlier game was that Anand could pick up a pawn on f4 without having to worry about Be7xg5. Material was equal again but Black's d-pawn was weak – in fact it was clear from the start that it would drop off, so Black needed to find counterplay on the kingside Somehow his bishop and queen got stuck, and Anand found a precise way to use geometry over the white squares and win material and the game. Anand:

This was one of these dream Najdorfs that I get sometimes, and obviously I was very pleased.

PGN string

Although Anand was happy with his 2/3 against not the worst players in the tournament, he didn't want to talk about his form yet. But by now it's safe to say that Sergey Karjakin is in excellent form, and most probably also in the best mood during the rest day! In the second Open Sicilian of the day, he defeated the thus far erratic Wang Hao. The Chinese chose the Classical Sicilian and Karjakin's Rauzer approach was not a surprise there – it has been the main line for decades.

In fact the 23-year-old Russian followed one of his own games, from 2007, for 19 moves. Right from that moment Wang went for a concrete series of moves which eventually led to nowhere except a worse ending (and White could even have tried for more). After another mistake in timetrouble, Wang had to loose a pawn and instead he resigned the game.

PGN string

Nakamura-Carlsen is without exception a good pairing as both players are always in for a fight. On Friday it wasn't different, and the battle was fought out with a Vienna Opening! Nakamura felt that he had missed a chance right after the opening, and Carlsen on his turn missed a way to continue playing at move 29, but this was based on a tactic which both players missed.

PGN string

Peter Svidler got a slight advantage against Levon Aronian in a line of the English which he also played with Black many times. It was quite a good game in fact, until the Russian GM suddenly offered a draw at move 31. He made a calculation error there, because the most logical way to continue would eventually lead to an ending he could try to win without running any risk.

PGN string

Then, at the end of the round, Teimour Radjabov was the third player to beat Jon Ludvig Hammer. In an Anti-Grünfeld the Azerbaijani got a promising position out of the opening, although he wasn't that convinced himself at the press conference.

But OK, I'm a pessimist. After I won the exchange I became an optimist!

said Radjabov. Hammer, about his three losses:

I can only be an optimist in this situation, because it cannot really get any worse!

PGN string

Norway Chess 2013 | Pairings & results

Round 1 08.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 2 09.05.13 15:00 CET
Carlsen ½-½ Topalov   Topalov ½-½ Radjabov
Anand ½-½ Aronian   Hammer 0-1 Karjakin
Nakamura 1-0 Wang Hao   Wang Hao 1-0 Svidler
Svidler 1-0 Hammer   Aronian 1-0 Nakamura
Karjakin 1-0 Radjabov   Carlsen ½-½ Anand
Round 3 10.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 4 12.05.13 15:00 CET
Anand 1-0 Topalov   Topalov - Hammer
Nakamura ½-½ Carlsen   Wang Hao - Radjabov
Svidler ½-½ Aronian   Aronian - Karjakin
Karjakin 1-0 Wang Hao   Carlsen - Svidler
Radjabov 1-0 Hammer   Anand - Nakamura
Round 5 13.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 6 14.05.13 15:00 CET
Nakamura - Topalov   Topalov - Wang Hao
Svidler - Anand   Aronian - Hammer
Karjakin - Carlsen   Carlsen - Radjabov
Radjabov - Aronian   Anand - Karjakin
Hammer   Wang Hao   Nakamura - Svidler
Round 7 15.05.13 15:00 CET   Round 8 17.05.13 15:00 CET
Svidler - Topalov   Topalov - Aronian
Karjakin - Nakamura   Carlsen - Wang Hao
Radjabov - Anand   Anand - Hammer
Hammer - Carlsen   Nakamura - Radjabov
Wang Hao - Aronian   Svidler - Karjakin
Round 9 18.05.13 12:00 CET        
Karjakin - Topalov        
Radjabov - Svidler        
Hammer - Nakamura        
Wang Hao - Anand        
Aronian - Carlsen        

Norway Chess 2013 | Round 3 standings

 

Schedule

Date Activity Place Time
07.05.2013 Blitz University of Stavanger 17:00 – 19:00
08.05.2013 Round 1 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
09.05.2013 Round 2 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
10.05.2013 Round 3 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
11.05.2013 School tournament Kongeparken, Ålgård  
12.05.2013 Round 4 Aarbakke AS, Bryne 15:00 – 23:00
13.05.2013 Round 5 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
14.05.2013 Round 6 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
15.05.2013 Round 7 Flor & Fjære, Sør Hidle 15:00 – 23:00
16.05.2013 Day off    
17.05.2013 Round 8 Hotel Residence, Sandnes 15:00 – 23:00
18.05.2013 Round 9 Stavanger Konserthus, Stavanger 12:00 – 19:00

Locations (Google Map)

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Abhi's picture

Awesome win by Anand.
Be6 was cool.

Morley's picture

Yeah, Anand played a beautiful game today. Karjakin is off to a great start. Honestly, given the short length of the tournament, +3 might already be enough for 1st place.

redivivo's picture

+3 might well be enough. He has "only" played the three bottom rated players but not everyone will beat all three of them, and if he can avoid losing to the top players that now remain for him he has good chances.

Morley's picture

True. He does have the top seeds all in a row over the next three rounds. Anand, Aronian, and Carlsen. Already a very entertaining tournament!

AAR's picture

Karjakin 3/3 against the bottom three.
Anand 2/3 against the top three.

SR's picture

Exactly

NN's picture

Initially I thought the same, but now on second thought, he has his "easiest" games behind him and his really tough games ahead. Let's see how he will continue.

Foo's picture

True. It was cool. But VA ponited out in the press conf that Bb3 was probably more accurate.

Chess Fan's picture

Yes Abhi. I loved games like this by the World Champion which is very instructional to me and a lot of us as Chess Fans, I am sure.

AAR's picture

Until Rd3 instead of Qf1, it was scary to watch Anand play the top line in Houdini continuously.

Anonymous's picture

best move -best hair 8-)

Anonymous's picture

What a mediocre display by Overrated Magnus. He has no openings, no middlegame, and his cheap endgame tricks have already been figured out by his rivals. In November, he will go down in flames.

Anonymous's picture

Three draws and he becomes "overrated," with "cheap endgame tricks"? Why does hyperbole - pro- and anti-Magnus - so often seem to reign in the comments section on Chessvibes?

Awfulhangover's picture

Don't feed the attention seeking troll.

Anonymous's picture

u r an idiot - rating are more than u

Anil Issac's picture

12 steps 12 steps 12 steps

PlanetX's picture

Woah S3 decided to hide his identity? Quite unusual of such a desperate attention seeker considering how "Popular" he is

Esfand's picture

Woah S3 decided to hide his identity? Quite unusual of such a desperate attention seeker considering how "Popular" he is

Morley's picture

I'm sure Carlsen is a bit disappointed to have three draws, but he has still been playing good chess. As others have pointed out, he has changed his style somewhat. He went into a theoretical battle against Anand, and an uncharacteristically dynamic one with Nakamura (although that might just have been Naka going for a fight). His opponents played very well, and there is no shame in drawing these games.

Thomas Oliver's picture

Interesting: one can play good chess despite only getting a series of draws? This may sound sarcastic but isn't at all meant to be sarcastic - I just wonder if people would ever say the same about draws from other top players (Anand, Kramnik, yes indeed Leko).

But who are "others" pointing out that Carlsen changed his style somewhat? It's hard to avoid theory altogether, but 3.Bb5+ against Anand (declining the Najdorf) isn't really going for a theoretical battle. And today, yes I would say it was Nakamura muddying the waters.

Tarjei's picture

"Interesting: one can play good chess despite only getting a series of draws?"

Is there anyone disagreeing with that fact? Of course you can play good chess despite only getting a draw. A game of chess is draw unless your opponent makes a mistake, so it's a natural result.

"I just wonder if people would ever say the same about draws from other top players (Anand, Kramnik, yes indeed Leko)."

Of course the same counts for any of the other players, doesn't matter who it is.

Chess Fan's picture

Yes Thomas. I have always thought highly of Peter Leko, and have been expecting him to reach that height again after the 2004 world championship against Vlady. Maybe soon....? Let us hope so for his sake.

Morley's picture

There is a difference between drawing three hard fought games in a row, and playing a dozen 30-move relatively toothless draws in a row, as Leko is known to do, and as Anand did (to a far lesser extent) in the World Championship match against Gelfand.

Both the commentators mentioned during Carlsen-Anand what a different approach Magnus was taking in the opening, and then specifically asked him in the Nakamura post-game why he didn't play his usual more solid and stodgy style. Both Nakamura and Carlsen replied that they were just trying to make the best moves, and if that calls for dynamic play, so be it.

Thomas Oliver's picture

Well, sometimes I have the impression (cf. Tarjei's comment above) that it "does matter who it is". If Carlsen draws a game that had always been roughly equal, it's called "good chess" and "hard fought". If Leko does the same, it's called a boring draw (there may be games where he didn't even try, but certainly not all of his drawn games).

The commentators may feel obliged to say something nice or interesting about Carlsen. I didn't follow the live commentary, others say it's biased - sort of understandable for this event, the candidates event was a different story. Anyway, I don't see big differences with Carlsen's other most recent white games against Anand (Bilbao 2012 and London Classic 2012). In all cases, Carlsen avoided the most topical lines (also 3.Bb5+ sidestepping the Najdorf and 4.d3 anti-Berlin); it was Anand who varied in the opening - not really different approaches, just "today I play this, tomorrow something else". In all cases, Carlsen got a playable position (not really a better position, but not sterile) - in Bilbao it became tactical and he won, in London it remained positional (with some little endgame tactics) and ended in a draw. Same story for their most recent game.

I guess every chess player just tries to make the best moves - so do I as an amateur, with a lower success rate but noone always finds the best move. In some cases, (what they consider) the best move is a dynamic pawn sacrifice. In some cases, the best move (found) leads to a slight advantage that may or may not turn out to be enough for a win. In some cases, the supposedly best move is simplifying to a clear draw.

Foo's picture

Nonsense. Magnus is good. Give him his props.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous's picture

Yes Baaaas.

bronkenstein's picture

King is slowly regaining his true form, but unless someone stops Karjakin... (yes, I know - he didn´t play exactly top seeds, but still =)

PS always refreshing to see Vienna on this level, and the game itself certainly didn´t disappoint.

redivivo's picture

Now this looked a bit like the Anand of 5-6 years ago, nice to see him play so well. Karjakin with 3/3 after his minus score in Zug where Topa scored +5 really shows that things change quickly in this business.

saturnz's picture

strong games by anand against the number 1, number 2 and 4 in the world

harami's picture

What an awesome game by Anand. This is vintage Anand. Beating a red hot Topalov in an intense Sicilian battle is something only these two can produce. btw Topa is no one to be messed around with in the Sicilian.

Good run by Karjakin who seems to be well poised to win this event now.

john's picture

just noticed the last match Anand plays is with WANG. who whacked ANand in their previous encounter

harami's picture

Anand was unlucky to have made a blunder against Wang who scored his first ever win.

Anand has been eating Wang breakfast all his life, so stop acting a joker please... and revel in Anand's greatness today :)

Morley's picture

"Anand has been eating Wang breakfast all his life"

This isn't true at all. They have one win each in classical games, with a couple of draws.

Chess Fan's picture

Will be interesting to see how it goes this time. I think it would be quite predictable. I will leave it with that for now.

Morley's picture

I agree. Wang Hao is a welcome addition to any tournament, I hope he sticks around for a while.

Chess Fan's picture

As a top Chinese player either Wang Hao or Wang Yue would be invited in most of these top tournaments, which is only fair. They are quite capable of beating anyone, the incredible Chinese, as I would like to say!

Horace Umbilical Knocking Shop's picture

The food in India really must be terrible. It's a pity Champ Anand has been eating so few other players for breakfast in recent months.

harami's picture

Oh, and i think Carlsen must be shi^&*ing in his pants after seeing Anand own Topalov.

really, this is how Anand owns people after he beats them in a match :)

Anonymous's picture

Oh, and I think you must be disgracing yourself here because admin is going to remove your comment, how you think about that?

Anil Issac's picture

If the admin is going to remove the comment, much much earlier your id should have been removed. By the by Are you a system admin of chessbase.

Horace Umbilical Knocking Shop's picture

You're absolutely right! Carlsen must be quaking in his boots at seeing Champ Anand benefit from the law of averages.

LuxAeterna's picture

Carlsen should forget about Anand. Carlsen must to worry about Karjakin better here

Anonymous's picture

yes, sure, ok, pretty face gravatar

Kill Bill's picture

Topalov went into a state of depression after losing to Anand in his world championship match. He was steadily on decline all these 5 years until he was finally able to overcome the demons by winning couple good tournaments and becoming world#4 in the ranking list. But suddenly his red hot form seemed to come to an abrupt stop when he saw Anand on the other side of the board and all his deep rooted sad memories came back to haunt him. Hope he doesn't go into depression again. Topa,Naka matches against Anand are never short of fireworks. Good show by Anand btw and hope this ramps up his form leading to WC against Carlsen who we know will be well prepared and never out of form

Kill Bill's picture

Adding salt to Topalov's loss, Anand also overtakes him in the live ratings. The WC loss definitely coming back to haunt Topalov once again

Anonymous's picture

Hammer is getting hammered (sorry, couldn't resist).

AAR's picture

He seems to develop cold feet towards the end. It happened today as well - using the wrong rook to exchange.

Chess Fan's picture

This is the Anand that I have been always alluding to.
I will say one time and one last time. I have played Anand (many years back) and other great players, but even with his quiet dignity, he was most intimidating to play with because of the most extraordinary talent that I could perceive.

Chess Fan's picture

Let us please stop Magnus bashing now. Whatever anyone says, he is a very great player with the highest ever rating. Let us give him due respect, PLEASE. If we are good enough to suggest better moves that made by these great players, let me know, I will also learn!

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