Reports | July 08, 2012 16:21

Karjakin wins Rapid World Championship as Carlsen stumbles on last day (VIDEO)

Sergey Karjakin wins the first official Rapid World Championship

Sergey Karjakin won the FIDE World Rapid Championship in Astana, Kazakhstan on Sunday. The Moscovite finished on 11.5/15, a point more than Magnus Carlsen, who lost to Vassily Ivanchuk and Alexander Grischuk on the last day. Veselin Topalov finished in third place. The Bulgarian edged out Shakhriyar Mamedyarov on tiebreak.

Sergey Karjakin wins the first official Rapid World Championship | All images © ChessVibes

Event World Blitz and Rapid Championships | PGN (rapid) via TWIC
Dates July 2-10, 2012
Location Astana, Kazakhstan
System Rapid: 16-player single round robin | Blitz: 16-player double round robin
Players Magnus Carlsen, Teimour Radjabov, Sergey Karjakin, Alexander Morozevich, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter Svidler, Boris Gelfand, Viktor Bologan, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Alexey Dreev, Igor Kurnosov, Vladislav Tkachiev, Murtas Kazhgaleyev, Anuar Ismagambetov, Dmitry Andreikin, Le Quang Liem, Nikolai Chadaev, Pavel Kotsur and Rinat Jumabayev
Rate of play Rapid: 15 minutes + 10 seconds increment per move, starting from move 1 | Blitz: 3 minutes + 2 seconds increment per move, starting from move 1.
Special rule The players are not allowed to offer draws directly to their opponents. Any draw claim will be permitted only through the Chief Arbiter and accepted in case of a triple-repetition of the position or the 50-move rule
Prize fund US $200,000 for each tournament; first prize US $40,000

The third and final day of the Rapid World Championship in Astana was one full of drama. Vassily Ivanchuk forgot about his clock in a position he couldn't lose, against Sergey Karjakin, who went on to score 4.5/5 and finish on a superb 11.5/15. Although he had a tougher schedule, it was still surprising to see Magnus Carlsen, who had played so strongly the first two days, stumble at the end. He lost to both Ivanchuk and Alexander Grischuk, and finished second behind Karjakin, who can now call himself the Steinitz of rapid chess! (When we mentioned this nickname to him, the Russian had a good laugh, and then said: "Do mention that in your report!" You're welcome, Sergey!)

Here's our video report:

In the 11th round everything was still going according to plan for Carlsen, who won easily against tail-ender Anuar Ismagambetov.

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In the same round, Karjakin was quite lucky. He had been defending a worse position for a while already, when his opponent, the unpredictable Chuky, playing black, forgot about his clock. (Despite the 10-second increment, he was in fact not the only player to lose on time in this event.)

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In this position Ivanchuk's flag fell...

Ivanchuk can't believe that his flag has fallen; a fortunate moment for Karjakin

The Ukrainian didn't leave the playing hall but kept on walking up and down between the boards, shaking his head. Not fully calmed down yet at the start of the next round, Ivanchuk then continued to help Karjakin by inflicting the very first loss upon Carlsen!

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As Karjakin would later tell us (see the video), he thought: "OK, this is my chance". He won an excellent game against Radjabov.

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Sergey Karjakin: 4.5/5 on the last day

Meanwhile, Topalov had to give up his chances to finish first. In fact the Bulgarian, who was two pawns up in a knight ending against Tkachiev, managed to lose this game!

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Carlsen then lost again, in a Berlin Wall against Grischuk.

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Carlsen resigns his game against Grischuk

In the penultimate round Karjakin, who was now leading by half a point, won yet again. For Peter Svidler the tournament lasted a bit too long; he lost the last two rounds.

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Carlsen got a slight advantage against Radjabov, but eventually he couldn't break the Azerbaijani's defence. This meant that Karjakin only needed a draw in the last round against Igor Kurnosov to win the first official Rapid World Championship. And that's what happened.

The arbiter congratulates Karjakin with his victory

If Karjakin had lost and Carlsen won, the two would have played an Armageddon game to decide upon the tournament. However, due to Karjakin's draw the Topalov-Carlsen game was not relevant for first place anymore. Carlsen was in fact lost at some point, but drew the game and finished second, a point behind Karjakin.

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Despite missing the mate, the Bulgarian still finished third. He edged out Shakhriyar Mamedyarov on the first tiebreak rule, which was the individual result.

Karjakin won US $40,000, Carlsen US $33,000 and Topalov and Mamedyarov both got US $25,000. There were money prizes for all players; see the regulations (PDF) for more details.

On Monday the players continue with the first 15 rounds of the World Blitz Championship (games of 3 minutes plus 2 seconds increment). The last 15 rounds will be played on Tuesday. The field will almost be the same, with Magnus Carlsen, Teimour Radjabov, Sergey Karjakin, Alexander Morozevich, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter Svidler, Boris Gelfand, Viktor Bologan and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov participating in both events. Dmitry Andreikin, Le Quang Liem, Nikolai Chadaev, Pavel Kotsur and Rinat Jumabayev will join them.

 

Games day 3

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World Rapid Championship 2012 | Final standings

 

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Columbo's picture

Congrats Karjakin, what a come back ! and to be honest, it was a bit outrageous the way Carlsen threw his pieces at Topalov's face as soon as Karjakin made his draw !!! Not very classy

thinking's picture

you mean metaphorically threw his pieces or he actually threw them at topalov? is it in the video?

Columbo's picture

well, watch the end of the game ! his time went down as he didnt want to play, and h4 is more than a big blunder, especially when you eat the knight with pawn just after ... Topalov took with the queen instead of putting his rook at the OBVIOUS winning place etc etc

thinking's picture

thanks :)

redivivo's picture

I followed the game, and Carlsen was smiling and chatting with Topalov as soon as it was over, so it was all quite amicable feelings both during and after the game, if anyone would think otherwise.

Columbo's picture

As soon as Karjakin made his draw, Carlsen stopped playing for three minutes, then OVER BLUNDERED ! It's obvious that Topalov refused to win the match ... So yes it's all friendly after all but Carlsen have behaved on the board like a gentleman

Columbo's picture

+++ didnt behave like a gentleman

redivivo's picture

He didn't behave like a gentleman because he blundered and thought for a long while on a move and then shook hands and chatted with the opponent?

Columbo's picture

no, he let the time run and THEN and only THEN he blundered, that makes a hell of a difference !!!

redivivo's picture

So it would have been more gentlemanly not to think before moving?

Columbo's picture

you're right , playing like a 1200 is just AAAAwsome, DUDE

Columbo's picture

let's be honest two minutes, tell me right in the eyes that Carlsen needed to think about it for three minutes before and finally play h5 !?!?!

rafael llanos's picture

you don't say "you eat the knoght" you should say "you take the knight"...you eat pasta...you eat an apple....

Columbo's picture

corrected :)

Thomas's picture

I found Carlsen's behavior at the end of his game against Radjabov (in the penultimate round) more questionable: Radjabov had to call the arbiter to claim a draw, in the meantime three more redundant move pairs were played. Quite reminiscent of the end of a drawn game between Topalov and Kramnik in Wijk aan Zee some years ago - though in Carlsen's case it must have been general frustration rather than personal animosity.

Tony's picture

Your supposed to call the arbiter to claim a draw by repetition.

Thomas's picture

I cannot replay the live video (apparently only the last round is still available) but I wonder what happened in other games that reached a dead-drawn position: maybe players nodded at each other before one of them called the arbiter? In Carlsen-Radjabov, the commentators got the impression that Carlsen wanted to play on with two bishops against one bishop, and my own impression was that Carlsen eventually offered his hand to Radjabov reluctantly and grudgingly (at least there was a handshake).

It also reminded me a bit of an example from my own practice: long time ago an IM tried to flag me in a dead-drawn opposite-colored bishop endgame with 20 vs. 5 minutes on the clocks. I repeatedly asked him to stop that nonsense - first politely, then less politely - and then called an arbiter. Even at that stage, he considered it perfectly normal to play on until flagfall, and was rather disappointed when the arbiter declared the game drawn. I would say that a semi-professional(?) should show some respect towards a patzer, and the world #1 should respect the world #4 (or even one of the Kazakh Elo tailenders).
Not such a big deal - Carlsen was understandably disappointed - but more questionable or awkward than whatever happened in the next and final round against Topalov.

slonik's picture

So Carlsen's reluctantly talking the draw means that he doesn't respect Radjabov? What utter nonsense

valg321's picture

not so. you can also call on the arbiter if its an obvious dead draw. It's usually when the opponent has blundered from an advantageous position and refuses to accept the fact that the game is now a draw.

Napoleon's picture

Beautiful victory of equipe for karjalin

strana's picture

That is normal. When Carsen lost (with white!!) to Alexandra Kosteniuk in the world blitz championship, he refused to shake hands with her. See it, the video is in youtube. If he did that to such nice a girl like Kosteniuk, why should he bahave "classy" against Topalov??

Anonymous's picture

By the way, Topalov showed great class. He got 0/3 from Tkachiev, Carlsen and Murtas when it could have been 2,5 and still he managed to smile after all these games. It must have cost him at least 5000 dollars but I am sure he has gained a lot of new fans. The contrast with Carlsen in the video couldn't be greater.

sab's picture

"That is normal. When Carsen lost (with white!!) to Alexandra Kosteniuk in the world blitz championship, he refused to shake hands with her."

What's normal there? Acting like an immature little brat?

strana's picture

sab: exactly this.. Carlsen is a very bad loser. How can someone act in this way against Kosteniuk??

KingTal's picture

Carlsen blew it, haha. So much for my prediction...
Well, congrats to Karjakin then, 10 wins in 15 games, impressive. :0

S3's picture

Great and well deserved!

ssd's picture

wow congrats Karjakin, cant wait to hear the conspiracy theories of the fanboys lol

thinking's picture

peter svidler gave karjakin the one point he needed ;)

gzkz's picture

great article

hansie's picture

Carsen lost against a 43 year old!!!

NN's picture

lol, you could have named the 43-year-old. It is no shame to lose to Ivanchuk, it can happen to anybody.

redivivo's picture

Great performance by Karjakin, Carlsen's 2850+ and +6 wasn't enough this time but Karjakin was just better. Nice to see Topalov play great chess again and finish third. Top players like Ivanchuk, Radjabov and Svidler failed to get a plus score and that shows how tough these events are.

Anonymous's picture

Nice to see Karjakin step up and win again, deservedly. He is definitely a super strong player, and with a likeable character. Let's hope he can narrow the gap in classical chess as well and challenge Carlsen for an interesting future duel at the very top.

Anonymous's picture

what gap?

redivivo's picture

Well, Karjakin finished eight in Wijk. It's early to say that Karjakin is equal with Carlsen in classical chess just because he did better in one rapid event. Still 58 points between the two in classical but that could soon be less.

Columbo's picture

that's not a very strong argument ( although i agree that Carlsen is ahead in classical games ) since Karjakin won Corus in 2009 while Carlsen finished 6/7

redivivo's picture

The argument is that Karjakin finishing ahead of Carlsen in a tournament once, 3.5 years ago (the only event in five years where Carlsen wasn't top three, by the way), doesn't mean that he is Carlsen's equal in classical, just like Nakamura isn't Carlsen's equal with just because he finished ahead in Wijk 2011.

Columbo's picture

i fully agree on that

Thomas's picture

Karjakin had finished shared first with Carlsen in Bazna - so they were already equal in classical chess at one occasion, even if a lot has been made of the fact that Carlsen had a 0.25 points Sonneborn-Berger advantage.

My overall summary of the tournament: Two players dominated, even if Carlsen almost had to settle for bronze in the end ("Carlsen was lucky against Topalov" seems far more plausible than any conspiracy theories). Day one was for both of them (but Karjakin already faced stronger opponents). Day two was for Carlsen. Day three was for Karjakin. Both players briefly "stumbled", losing two games in a row - but for some reason only in Carlsen's case it's prominently mentioned in the Chessvibes headline.

redivivo's picture

"Karjakin had finished shared first with Carlsen in Bazna - so they were already equal in classical chess at one occasion, even if a lot has been made of the fact that Carlsen had a 0.25 points Sonneborn-Berger advantage."

No one cares much about tiebreaks except the group of regulars that were unhappy about Chessvibes calling Carlsen the winner of the event after he had won it (on tiebreak). Anyway, the idea that two players are equal because they at some occasion had the same result is strange. Players can't be evaluated by cherry picking single results. I don't think Kamsky is better than Karjakin just because he finished ahead of him in the classical event they played this year (Wijk), I think the rating list is a better measure than picking some event that had a result that fits better with my preferences.

"Carlsen was lucky against Topalov"

Yes, but I don't think he cared much about second or shared second or third on tiebreak. Such things happen in rapid, by the way. Ivanchuk lost on time against Karjakin in a position only he could win unless he had forgotten about the clock. One can't speak of luck too often in chess.

Thomas's picture

You started by cherry-picking (or rotten apple picking?) Wijk this year, which was Karjakin's worst round-robin result of the last two years - BTW it wasn't even _that_ bad, he lost just three rating points. The point I am trying to make: if Karjakin realizes his full potential, he might be on par with Carlsen or just slightly behind (finishing half a point behind Magnus as in Tal Memorial 2011 may be a 'typical' result). But Karjakin isn't as consistent, and this (combined with the fact that he was farther behind Carlsen at some stage) causes the gap in the rating list. On average, Karjakin is at least on par with Nakamura who gets much more attention, invitations and praise.

On Topalov-Carlsen: maybe Carlsen really didn't care much (only first place counts for him, and that was already gone?); still it would have been an anticlimactic finish to "lose" the silver medal. The possible difference in prize money, about 3000$, might matter even less for Carlsen - he probably gets such sums or more for an hour of fashion modelling or a TV appearance!?

Anonymous's picture

Karjakin is already on par with the best of the best for 2 years. No need to worry about consistency no more.

slonik's picture

Well he lost five games in Wijk so he sure isn't anywhere near as consistent as Carlsen

Anonymous's picture

Ok Carlsen is more consistent and Karjakin is world champion.

Anonymous's picture

Winner of an event named "world championship" sounds more correct. Too many contenders and previously qualified players missing here to justify the name.

Anonymous's picture

I'm sure you will say the same when someone else wins the blitz tournament ;)

Anonymous's picture

Someone else but whom? It is of course a very strong tournamnent, no doubt. And the money is of course great for a rapid or blitz event. Still, in any other major sports this kind of setup wouldn't be considered a real world championship with the current title holder and several other real contenders missing. No way.

Thomas's picture

The organizers invited the entire top10, what more could they do? It's not their fault that several players declined, it's not their fault either that Astana is a rather remote location (which may have played a role).
BTW who is/was the current rapid title holder before the event? Aronian won the last Mainz event, also called (by the organizers) Grenke Leasing Rapid World Championship. But that event - while strong and interesting - always and by design had several real contenders missing, though it had one (1) qualifying spot from the open the year before.

Anonymous's picture

The real rapid world championship was Amber, compare the level of an event like this:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=72927&crosstable=1

with the "World Championship":

http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=6593

This wasn't much to take seriously as a World Championship either, without Anand, Kramnik and Aronian, who all participated in the above linked Amber event.

Anonymous's picture

Nakamura is busy writing his book but other players possibly don't take rapid and blitz serious enough to travel this far to an separate event. Travel expenses can't be the problem as regulations stipulate good compensation.
By the way, I defenitely agree with Aronian and before that a case can be made for Karjakin winning the 2010 rapid world cup.

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