Reports | October 03, 2006 8:14

Kasparov talks

KasparovZelfs Karpov heeft inmiddels zijn mening gegeven over wat vanavond in het sportjournaal de 'toiletrel' werd genoemd. Dat maakt dat het wachten alleen nog was op... Kasparov. Zoals wel vaker reageerde The Boss via The Wall Street Journal, nog voordat duidelijk werd dat de zesde partij gespeeld zou worden. Die partij eindigde vandaag in remise.Meanwhile even Karpov commented on what was called the 'toilet commotion' on the Dutch sport journal tonight. Which means we only had to wait for... Kasparov to share his opinion. Like he did before, The Boss reacted via The Wall Street Journal, before it was clear that the sixth would indeed be played. That game ended in a draw today.

De eerste zes alinea's kunnen door schakers overgeslagen worden. Kasparov moet logischerwijs de situatie een beetje uitleggen voor een breed lezerspubliek. Wat lezenswaardiger wordt het als hij ingaat op zijn afgebroken match met Karpov in 1985. "My battles with the power-hungry thugs who ran the Soviet and international chess world were politically driven. To me they represented a backwards and corrupt system. They saw me as a threat to their control." Subtiel refereert de ex-schaker aan zijn huidige status in Rusland. Net als in deze passage: "The event is taking place in the capital of the Russian republic of Kalmykia under the auspices of its president, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, who is also the president of FIDE. He has created a vertical column of power that would be familiar to any observer of Russia today."

Het lag natuurlijk voor de hand dat de politicus Kasparov het Wall Street Journal-podium wederom zou gebruiken om zijn politieke denkbeelden naar voren te brengen, ook in een artikel dat over schaken gaat. Maar dit stukje, inmiddels ingehaald door de geschiedenis, gaat misschien wat ver: "Mr. Topalov was losing at the game and so he switched to gamesmanship. If the match is aborted he can claim he wasn't defeated and so maintain his status as FIDE champion. Mr. Kramnik rose to the provocation and now may walk off with the same faded title he took from me in 2000. For years he avoided both a rematch and unification with FIDE. If this chaos isn't resolved he can go on to claim "champion for life" standing outside of FIDE. Just like their brothers in spirit in the Kremlin, the chess nomenclatura hope to prolong the anarchy and corruption from which they have profited for so long."

Al met al niet bijzonder interessant, ook al is het Kasparov. Hopelijk is het aangekondigde interview, binnenkort bij Chessbase, smakelijker.

Update 3 oktober: het (korte) interview staat inmiddels hier. Ook niet superboeiend. Deze is wel aardig: "A referee can't lose control of a game or it will become like Netherlands-Portugal at the World Cup."

Voor het geval je hem nog niet gezien hebt: speel hier partij 6 na. De meest gewenste saaie remise die er ooit geweest is.The first six paragraphs can be skipped by chess players. Of course Kasparov has to explain everything for his non-chess audience. You'll want to read it from where he talks about the match cancellation in 1985, against Karpov. "My battles with the power-hungry thugs who ran the Soviet and international chess world were politically driven. To me they represented a backwards and corrupt system. They saw me as a threat to their control." In a subtle way the ex-chess player refers to his current status in Russia. Just like in this part: "The event is taking place in the capital of the Russian republic of Kalmykia under the auspices of its president, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, who is also the president of FIDE. He has created a vertical column of power that would be familiar to any observer of Russia today."

It was to be expected that the politician Kasparov would use the Wall Street Journal stage again to spread his political view, even in an article about chess. But this part, in the meantime not relevant anymore, probably goes a bit too far: "Mr. Topalov was losing at the game and so he switched to gamesmanship. If the match is aborted he can claim he wasn't defeated and so maintain his status as FIDE champion. Mr. Kramnik rose to the provocation and now may walk off with the same faded title he took from me in 2000. For years he avoided both a rematch and unification with FIDE. If this chaos isn't resolved he can go on to claim "champion for life" standing outside of FIDE. Just like their brothers in spirit in the Kremlin, the chess nomenclatura hope to prolong the anarchy and corruption from which they have profited for so long."

Altogether not especially interesting, even though it's Kasparov. Hopefully the announced interview soon to be published on Chessbase will be more juicy.

Update October 3rd: the (short) interview can now be found over here. Not that juicy either. This one I like, though: "A referee can't lose control of a game or it will become like Netherlands-Portugal at the World Cup."

In the case you didn't see it yet: replay the sixth game here. The most wanted dull draw ever.

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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

Goran's picture

"The most wanted dull draw ever." - Well said! :)

rapanui's picture

Een paar dagen geleden schreef ik op deze site dat Kasparov misschien een goede bemiddelaar zou zijn. Een totaal verkeerde inschatting, zo blijkt maar weer eens. Deze reactie slaat echter alles. We hebben veel meningen gehoord de laatste dagen, maar die van Kasparov is toch werkelijk de minst interessantste, de meest bevooroordeelde en het minst weloverwogen.

doggy's picture

Het interview is inmiddels bij Chessbase verschenen.Meanwhile the interview appeared at Chessbase.

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