Reports | October 01, 2012 20:39

London GP R9: Mamedyarov takes the lead from Gelfand

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov is the new leader at the FIDE Grand Prix in London. On Monday the Azerbaijani beat Leinier Dominguez while the leader of the tournament, Boris Gelfand, went down for the first time, against Alexander Grischuk. Hikaru Nakamura lost his fourth game in a row, to Mickey Adams, and Veselin Topalov defeated Vassily Ivanchuk.

Mamedyarov leads in London with two rounds to go | Photo © Ray Morris-Hill

Event Grand Prix | PGN via TWIC
Dates September 20-October 4, 2012
Location London, UK
System 12-player round robin
Players Hikaru Nakamura, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Grischuk, Veselin Topalov, Peter Svidler, Wang Hao, Boris Gelfand, Peter Leko, Shakriyar Mamedyarov, Leinier Dominguez Perez, Anish Giri, Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Rate of play

120 minutes for the Ô¨Årst 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then each player will be allotted 15 minutes after the second time control and an increment of 30 seconds per move will be allowed from move 61 onwards

Extra Players will not be allowed to offer draws directly to their opponents; players will continue to play if the arbiter does not authorise the draw

In a spectacular round with four decisive games, the standings were shaken up considerably. Gelfand snatched a poisoned pawn and lost his first game of the tournament to Grischuk, which gave Mamedyarov the chance to take over the lead by defeating Dominguez. At the other end of the leaderboard Nakamura's form crisis continued – the American lost against Adams. In the last two rounds Mamedyarov will defend his half point lead against Wang Hao and Leko.

Grischuk won in 19th century style, and after the game he said: "I was not 100% sure that the sacrifice would win, but I saw that I had at least perpetual." GM Robert Fontaine added: "Such a move just has to be played."

PGN string

After the game Gelfand did analyze with Grischuk. The conclusion was that taking on d2 was already the decisive mistake. If Gelfand had castled there "Black's chances to draw are bigger than White's chances to win" (Grischuk).

Videos by Macauley Peterson

Mamedyarov nicely outplayed Dominguez in a Bogo-Indian with an early g2-g4-g5 push. The new leader wasn't sure about this plan, and thought that it was about equal until the inaccurate d6-d5 push. The players quickly reached an ending, and White used his bishop pair with maximum effect.

PGN string

Nakamura played the Caro-Kann against Adams and blitzed out his opening moves. He then probably miscalculated something, because his rook got sort of stuck on a4 without doing much, and White obtained total control over the d-file.

PGN string

Gelfand and Grischuk are now half a point behind Mamedyarov, but so is Topalov. On Monday the Bulgarian managed to win a slightly better ending against Ivanchuk.

PGN string

Wang Hao and Leko had theoretical fight, even though the Chinese played this Nimzo line for the first time and Leko did not expect it. The Hungarian had bad memories, losing two crucial games with Black in it. This time he played accurate enough. 

PGN string

Giri vs Kasimdzhanov seemed to be heading for a draw quickly as soon as Black managed to get ...Ne4 and ...f5 in. However, Giri found a way to continue, and at some point Black allowed some sort of breakthrough. In an position with only heavy pieces, both kings were under attack by the opponent queen, so a perpetual was always in the air. It's not clear whether White could win somewhere.

PGN string

Schedule & pairings

Round 1 15:00 CET 21.09.12   Round 2 15:00 CET 22.09.12
Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Leko   Leko 1-0 Ivanchuk
Nakamura 0-1 Gelfand   Adams ½-½ Mamedyarov
Topalov ½-½ Grischuk   Giri ½-½ Wang Hao
Dominguez ½-½ Giri   Grischuk ½-½ Dominguez
Wang Hao ½-½ Adams   Gelfand ½-½ Topalov
Mamedyarov ½-½ Ivanchuk   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Nakamura
Round 3 15:00 CET 23.09.12   Round 4 15:00 CET 24.09.12
Nakamura ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Adams
Topalov ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Giri ½-½ Ivanchuk
Dominguez ½-½ Gelfand   Grischuk 1-0 Mamedyarov
Wang Hao ½-½ Grischuk   Gelfand 1-0 Wang Hao
Mamedyarov 1-0 Giri   Kasimdzhanov ½-½ Dominguez
Ivanchuk ½-½ Adams   Nakamura ½-½ Topalov
Round 5 15:00 CET 25.09.12   Round 6 15:00 CET 27.09.12
Topalov ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Giri
Dominguez ½-½ Nakamura   Grischuk ½-½ Adams
Wang Hao ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Gelfand ½-½ Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov ½-½ Gelfand   Kasimdzhanov 0-1 Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk ½-½ Grischuk   Nakamura 0-1 Wang Hao
Adams ½-½ Giri   Topalov 1-0 Dominguez
Round 7 15:00 CET 28.09.12   Round 8 15:00 CET 29.09.12
Dominguez ½-½ Leko   Leko ½-½ Grischuk
Wang Hao ½-½ Topalov   Gelfand ½-½ Giri
Mamedyarov 1-0 Nakamura   Kasimdzhanov 1-0 Adams
Ivanchuk ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Nakamura 0-1 Ivanchuk
Adams 0-1 Gelfand   Topalov ½-½ Mamedyarov
Giri ½-½ Grischuk   Dominguez ½-½ Wang Hao
Round 9 15:00 CET 01.10.12   Round 10 15:00 CET 02.10.12
Wang Hao ½-½ Leko   Leko - Gelfand
Mamedyarov 1-0 Dominguez   Kasimdzhanov - Grischuk
Ivanchuk 0-1 Topalov   Nakamura - Giri
Adams 1-0 Nakamura   Topalov - Adams
Giri ½-½ Kasimdzhanov   Dominguez - Ivanchuk
Grischuk 1-0 Gelfand   Wang Hao - Mamedyarov
Round 11 12:00 CET 03.10.12        
Mamedyarov - Leko        
Ivanchuk - Wang Hao        
Adams - Dominguez        
Giri - Topalov        
Grischuk - Nakamura        
Gelfand - Kasimdzhanov        

London GP 2012 | Round 9 standings

 

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

KingTal's picture

The first 4 guys were Candidates last year, maybe they acually were worth it. )

Chris's picture

The start 5 were candidates

KingTal's picture

I meant that the guys placed 1-4 at moment in this tournament were in the Candidate matches last year, whatever you were trying to say. lol

Chris's picture

The 5th one, Leko was playing WCCh match :)

sen's picture

It is suprising to see no comments from great nakumura's fan.Is this worst performance by a number rank 5 fide player ever on loosing four consecutive matches ? Nak is out of top 10 live ratings!

hansie's picture

The Top Gun has five losses now in the tourney, the last four straight ones, and three losses to forty-year plus players.

eric's picture

Nakamura is having a terrible tournament. But he will be back in Top-10 soon, it is for sure. By the way I am not a Naka fan, but I love to see him playing interesting chess.

flea's picture

Funny how u confuse impotent chess with interesting chess. The most interesting side of this is the pathetic amount of idiotic ideas he puts in his games . This guy is no big deal. He will evaporate very soon from the top chess world.

eric's picture

Look at the liverating list again man:) Who is back in the list?

choufleur's picture

Nakamura 2800+ by the end of the year ?

RealityCheck's picture

Carlsen 2853.5 Biel? Bilbao? Boring!

123's picture

Maybe he should re-hire Kasparov.

Spectator's picture

Rather a horrible loss by Gelfand. Reminds me of early 20th century games!

Thomas's picture

Before today, Gelfand had scored 2.5/3 with the Sicilian - it took an offbeat line (something he couldn't possibly prepare?) to beat him ... .

NN's picture

Why blame the opening, when he played such a move as ...Qxd2 in the middlegame? I was watching the game live, and I wondered how could he miss the reply Bxe6, or, if he didn't miss it, how could he underestimate it. It is immediately obvious this is a very dangerous sacrifice for Black. And ...0-0 was such an obvious alternative, putting the King to safety.

flea's picture

Yeah that was smth very weird.

Thomas's picture

Yeah but this would leave him a pawn behind with little compensation, only some (vague?) hopes based on opposite-colored bishops. To me it seems that something had already gone wrong before - hard to say when, where and why, in any case Grischuk managed to steer clear of typical Sicilian structures and plans.

Bartleby's picture

Gelfand's game reminded me of his loss in the WCh, where he over-confidently went into a line that didn't work tactically, and, uncharacteristically for GM play, didn't re-evaluate it in time. He gave up his lead without a real fight.

Bronkenstein's picture

Gandalf was the first to deviate (6...Nc6 or, identically , 8...Nc6) - one would expect Grischuk - if anyone - to be surprised, but instead Boris then spent almost half an hour on his VERY next move! @ that point, I was almost sure that he will mindfart and lose - as he did =(

Chris's picture

Gandalf?! I didn't know fictional characters played chess at the international level!

Chris's picture

Have been 2 or more Chrises? :-)

Bronkenstein's picture

Nobody told you that Lord of the Rings is in fact the documentary about Barriss Gandalf, AKA the Cookie Exterminator? =)

Chris's picture

Would have been Naka Moro he would withdraw from tournament.

MJul's picture

Moro withdrew and spend months without playing torunaments before because he had several health issues (or chronic disease, we don't know). He even talk about being ill all the time when he was a kid.

If you don't know you should better investigate before making such statements.

Chris's picture

Moro withdraws many times. After the last one he won blitz championship in Moscow in short time.

MJul's picture

Yes, but blitz it's not classical. Remember Tal defeated Kasparov in Blitz a month before he died.

Chris's picture

The point was that he has been healthy.
Ill person does not play tournaments.

MJul's picture

Did you read what I wrote? Tal was ill, he runned away from the hospital while dying and still won versus Kasparov.

Anonymous's picture

Bwahahaha @ Nakamura!! Love to see an arrogant loser get his just deserts.

Let's face it, he had this coming to him for a looong time! ..I ca't stop laughing. Lol!!

Anonymous's picture

"Just desert?" Which one of his victories he didn't deserve? All his successes have come from his talent and hard work.

The fact that you rejoice in someone else's misfortune speaks for your character

RG13's picture

Topalov is back in the saddle!

noyb's picture

Nakamura needs to hire a coach. Situation indicates multiple problems, not just one. Opening choices, emotional fatigue, and psychology all factors. I'd suggest Adrian Mikhalichishin!

Anonymous's picture

He needs a shrink more than a coach.

Casey Abell's picture

Oh boy, a depressed tweet from Naka today...

While I do my absolute best to commit harakiri, (chess) at least her calming presence from afar puts it all in perspective.

Bartleby's picture

That's rather poetic.

Casey Abell's picture

It's rather down in the dumps.

Aiy9W's picture

"While I do my absolute best to commit harakiri, (chess) at least her calming presence from afar puts it all in perspective."

naka tweet 4h ago

Anonymous's picture

Gelfand surrendered the lead in this tourney for the same reason he surrendered the lead during his WC match - pawn snatching!

foo's picture

i thought it was more like rook snatching ;)

Anonymous's picture

It's a sad time for Nakamura and his fans. But we must remember his strange series of losses against Carlsen that didn't account for their rating differences - losses that both attributed to psychological rather than skill. Here, in a tournament to decide who will challenge the WC, he makes the same kind of errors, the same type of losses.

I think Nakamura must first believe he can be the WC, only thien will things turn around for him in the Grand Prix.

RG13's picture

That and perhaps change his style of play to something more classical or perhaps even Soviet. His Tata Steele victory while being coached by Kasparov is prominent.

sen's picture

We can't call it is a odd and strang series of losses.This performance is expected from nakamura in WC cycle.Nakamura is not mentally strong to compete in World championship he can't perform when it really matters.Atleast now he should stop his bigmouthing and understand what seperates from infant with MAN.There is big surprise stored in candidates matches 2013 (ie magnus loosed badly).I think aronian will take the mantle from anand after next two cycles(ie anand should retain next two championship).

Chris's picture

Do you play tournament chess?
I doubt.

sen's picture

No i don't, iam quite busy with software profession.

Chris's picture

So you should not make remarks about tournament play.

sen's picture

i don't think there is a rule in chessvibes forum on commenting that it needs pre-requiste to be an tournament player.Just accept that your favourite over hype nakamura is a flop show here and going to be a big flop in future.

Chris's picture

I do not mean that it is forbidden but that the remarks made by person who does not know the tournament play are sometimes funny or ridiculous.

sen's picture

No i don't, iam quite busy with software profession.

RealityCheck's picture

@ sen Don't be offended--

"what separates from infant with MAN" is usually expressed in other words. For example: Competing for a shot at the world championship title "separates the men from the boys"

sen's picture

i used the word "INFANT" knowingly.

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