Reports | April 24, 2012 7:58

Ni Hua first on tiebreak in Dubai

Ni Hua of China finished first on tiebreak at the Dubai Open. The 28-year-old grandmaster from Shanghai finished shared first, together with Georgians Baadur Jobava & Mikheil Mchedlishvili as well as Normunds Miezis of Latvia and Chanda Sandipan of India.

Ni Hua wins the 14th Dubai Open | All photos courtesy of the official website

Event 14th Dubai Open | Chess-ResultsPGN via TWIC
Dates April 14th-24th, 2012
Location Dubai, UAE
System 9-round Swiss
Players

The strongest participants are Baadur Jobava, Loek van Wely, Vladimir Akopian, Ivan Sokolov, Viorel Iordachescu, Abhijeet Gupta, Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu, Tigran Petrosian, Parimarjan Negi and Ni Hua

Rate of play 90 minutes for the whole game + 30 seconds increment from move 1
Prize fund US $50,000 with a US $10,000 first prize

See also our first report: Akopian & Ni Hua lead in Dubai

Tournament leaders Vladimir Akopian and Ni Hua, who both scored 4.5/5, drew their mutual game on Saturday morning quickly. This allowed four players to join them in the lead: the three Indians Abhijeet Gupta, Parimarjan Negi and Chanda Sandipan and also Normunds Miezis of Latvia and Evgeny Miroshnichenko of Ukraine. Gupta won amazingly quickly with an exchance sacrifice, just after the game, a Bogo-Indian, had left theory:

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Later that day the 7th round was also played. Latvian Miezis, who has huge Weekender tournament experience, was the only grandmaster (out of seven) who managed to win (and thus score 2/2 that day).

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Normunds Miezis (Latvia)

Dutchman Loek van Wely had started disappointingly but fought himself back to the higher ranks. He handled the black side of a Velimirovic Attack pretty well:

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In round 8 Miezis drew with Black against Gupta and only one player joined him in the lead: Chanda Sandipan.

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The following game was a sharp affair:

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The last round was played on Monday, with a lot of players still in contention for big money prizes. Miezis and Sandipan both played carefully and drew their game on board 1 after 30 moves. Baadur Jobava waved a mating net in an ending:

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Mchedlishvili emerged as the winner against Van Wely, who also played for a win with a Benoni.

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Ni Hua defeated Kuzubov and became one of many to finish on shared first place.

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The 28-year-old Chinese grandmaster edged out Jobava, Mchedlishvili, Miezis and Chanda on tiebreak.

The 14th Dubai Open, also called the Sheikh Rashid Bin Hamdan Al Maktoum Cup, was held in the Dubai Chess & Culture Club. The tournament was named after the Deputy Ruler of Dubai and the Minister of Finance and Industry of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The total prize fund was US $50,000, with a first prize of US $10,000. We presume that the five GMs shared the total amount of the first five prizes combined. 

14th Dubai Open | Final standings (top 40)

Rk. Title Name FED Rtg RtgI Pts. TB1 TB2 TB3 TB4
1 GM Ni Hua CHN 2637 2637 7.0 20791 0.0 54.5 42.5
2 GM Jobava Baadur GEO 2706 2706 7.0 20693 0.0 52.5 40.5
3 GM Mchedlishvili Mikheil GEO 2626 2626 7.0 20457 0.0 50.0 39.5
4 GM Miezis Normunds LAT 2557 2557 7.0 20334 0.0 53.5 42.5
5 GM Sandipan Chanda IND 2595 2595 7.0 20274 0.0 52.0 41.0
6 GM Akopian Vladimir ARM 2684 2684 6.5 20513 0.0 51.0 42.0
7 GM Petrosian Tigran L ARM 2643 2643 6.5 20488 0.0 51.5 40.5
8 GM Miroshnichenko Evgenij UKR 2624 2624 6.5 20292 0.0 50.5 40.0
9 GM Andriasian Zaven ARM 2616 2616 6.5 20215 0.0 52.0 40.5
10 GM Gupta Abhijeet IND 2643 2643 6.5 19938 0.0 49.5 39.0
11 GM Hovhannisyan Robert ARM 2600 2600 6.5 19875 0.0 48.5 38.0
12 GM Volkov Sergey RUS 2623 2623 6.5 19689 0.0 46.5 36.5
13 GM Zhou Weiqi CHN 2628 2628 6.5 19666 0.0 50.5 39.0
14 IM Shyam Sundar M IND 2474 2474 6.5 19316 0.0 46.0 36.0
15 GM Sokolov Ivan NED 2653 2653 6.5 19160 0.0 49.5 38.0
16 GM Kuzubov Yuriy UKR 2615 2615 6.0 20123 0.0 51.5 40.0
17 GM Baklan Vladimir UKR 2612 2612 6.0 20037 0.0 48.5 37.5
18 IM Shyam Nikil P IND 2490 2490 6.0 19997 0.0 51.0 40.5
19 GM Negi Parimarjan IND 2639 2639 6.0 19941 0.0 52.0 40.5
20 GM Iordachescu Viorel MDA 2644 2644 6.0 19859 0.0 48.5 38.0
21 IM Grigoryan Karen H ARM 2510 2510 6.0 19692 0.0 49.5 38.5
22 GM Ganguly Surya Shekhar IND 2633 2633 6.0 19661 0.0 48.0 36.5
23 GM Van Wely Loek NED 2691 2691 6.0 19560 0.0 49.5 38.0
24 GM Nisipeanu Liviu-Dieter ROU 2643 2643 6.0 19399 0.0 46.5 36.5
25 FM Atabayev Maksat TKM 2367 2367 6.0 19339 0.0 45.5 35.5
26 GM Ghaem Maghami Ehsan IRI 2581 2581 6.0 19268 0.0 47.5 36.5
27 WGM Sergeyeva Mariya KAZ 2327 2327 6.0 18578 0.0 42.0 32.5
28 GM Evdokimov Alexander A RUS 2555 2555 6.0 18535 0.0 41.5 32.0
29 GM Harutjunyan Gevorg ARM 2455 2455 6.0 18463 0.0 42.5 32.5
30   Baghdasaryan Vahe ARM 2406 2406 6.0 18411 0.0 42.0 33.0
31 GM Gopal G N IND 2572 2572 5.5 20307 0.0 52.0 41.0
32 IM Vishnu Prasanna V IND 2406 2406 5.5 20213 0.0 48.0 38.0
33 GM Pantsulaia Levan GEO 2595 2595 5.5 20095 0.0 52.0 42.0
34 IM Akshayraj Kore IND 2422 2422 5.5 19926 0.0 45.0 35.5
35 IM Ezat Mohamed EGY 2441 2441 5.5 19780 0.0 46.0 36.0
36 FM Atabayev Yusup TKM 2404 2404 5.5 19727 0.0 47.5 37.5
37 GM Lalith Babu M R IND 2532 2532 5.5 19490 0.0 47.0 36.5
38 GM Amin Bassem EGY 2608 2608 5.5 19482 0.0 47.5 37.0
39 GM Kravtsiv Martyn UKR 2588 2588 5.5 19326 0.0 45.5 35.5
40 GM Kovchan Alexander UKR 2598 2598 5.5 19287 0.0 44.0 34.0

See also our first report: Akopian & Ni Hua lead in Dubai

Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

st32's picture

GM Sokolov on his round 2 forfeit:
Ivan explains that he and Loek van Wely had shared a taxi which had mistakenly driven them to a distant part of Dubai. After the mistake had been corrected the two arrived 32 minutes after the start of the round (30 minutes are allowed). "Loek opponent clearly understood the problem and wanted to play the game," says Ivan. "My opponent wanted her point very badly. After the appeals committee had positively answered our appeal and allowed our games to be played, Loek's game started. Tania Sachdev left the playing hall once she saw appeals committee meeting with deliberate intention to 'win' her point. She was in her hotel, so I got a zero. About 15 minutes later the Delhi girl happily arrived back in the playing hall..."

IM Tania Sachdev on Sokolov's reaction:
"They have no zero tolerance here and with a 30 minute default time the games start at 5:30 p.m. All the players leave by the official bus together at 4:45. My opponent showed up a little over the default time for whatever reason he claimed. The arbiter stopped the clock on my board and signed the sheets, I left for my hotel about 15 minutes later, around half past six, not even aware that there was going to be an appeal. At half past seven in the evening I got a call from the organizer stating that they have decided that I must play the game and must get to the tournament hall as soon as I can, which is a little far and if stuck in traffic can take forever. It was of course not ideal to start playing at 8 p.m. when the game is suppose to begin at half past five, but in any case if they said I had to then I had to. However five minutes later, while I was at the reception leaving, I got another call saying that there has been a miscommunication and that there is a possibility of a rematch only if I want it and its not forced. I took the decision that I did not want to start my game at eight in the evening, and that was it. As I was on my way I went to the hall and reached well past eight p.m. I am extremely shocked at Mr. Sokolov's reaction. This is a sport and there are rules. If a person is not able to make it on time, let alone 30 minutes later, for whatever reason, I really think the least they can do is get over it, instead of making themselves sound like the victim of their opponents decision."

Thoughts?

Rodzjer's picture

This is a funny story. Once more it shows how ridiculous some of the rules around chess are.
Sokolov was late. The game was declared lost. He appealed. The committee decided. Sachdev had a right to refuse. She did. Sokolov lost. Those are the facts. The rest is emotion.

Niima's picture

Well said. I would have liked to play in her place, but a game started at 20:00 can last past midnight and affect the next day as well. IM Tania Sachdev was within her rights.

redivivo's picture

Sokolov is just a bad loser, nothing to discuss.

aligma's picture

There is bad loser and a ruthless winner.

st32's picture

well, it seems to me that playing the game was definitely the sporting thing to do. She wont gain rating with this point, and I think that any norm gets cancelled if one of the points is a walkover. By Sokolov's version, she went out of her way to claim a useless point and by her version, she didn't play because it was too late. Regardless,I don't think he has any real reason to complain. What happened to him could have happened to anyone, but more walkovers have been given for sillier reasons.

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