Reports | December 09, 2009 1:39

Ponomariov in World Cup final too

After Boris Gelfand, today Ruslan Ponomariov also qualified for the final of the 2009 FIDE World Cup. The Ukrainian defeated Vladimir Malakhov in a very exciting rapid tiebreak final: 3-1. Ponomariov lost the first game, but then won three in a row.

The FIDE World Chess Cup takes place November 20th-December 15th inn Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It's a seven-round knockout with six rounds of matches comprising two games per round. The final seventh round consists of four games and will be played December 10th-14th.

The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move from move one. Games start at 15:00h local time (11:00 CET).

Results round 6

World Cup 2009 | Results round 6

Tiebreak round 6

It was a completely new experience for ChessVibes and it's host Merijn van Delft on the live commentary today; first four rapid games, starting from 11:00 CET in the morning, and while the fourth started, by then the first round of the London Chess Classic had also started. Not an easy job, but the result was there: a wonderful coverage of a total of eight high-level chess games, which you can still replay.

Merijn had a nice start of his day as Ponomariov and Malakhov were fighting out a wonderful match. The first game went to Malakhov, and even with the black pieces. Again his Chebanenko Slav looked very solid, and then the Russian sacrificed his knight for a strong attack. Ponomariov could get away with a bad rook ending, but thanks to good technique Malakhov won the game anyway. A great start.

In such a situation one might start to play for a win with Black, but not by running too many risks. For this the Grünfeld is well-suited, and this is what Ponomariov picked. Malakhov however was well prepared and got a highly promising position, but then blew it. A level endgame came on the board in which it seemed like Ponomariov wanted to show that he's an even stronger endgame player than Malakhov. And he did.

In the next game Ponomariov decided to avoid another Chebanenko and he did that by postponing d2-d4 (but making all the other normal moves against the Slav). In the end the move had to be played, and a standard QGA was reached. Malakhov was taken by surprise by the move 10.e4!? and immediately erred. White's attack was very strong, and after the queens were exchanged Ponomariov won his piece back, and then won the endgame easily, two pawns up.

Probably in shock of what was happening, Malakhov again went wrong already in the opening phase of game 4, mixing up the move order. Ponomariov quickly won a pawn, and because of the score Malakhov avoided the exchange of queens, but this led to an even quicker disaster.

ChessVibes LiveYou can still replay IM Merijn van Delft's annotations on the live page. We're covering the World Cup and the London Chess Classic for free; starting from 2010 our live commentary will be subscription-based. You'll find more info here.

Tiebreak games round 6

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup - Pairings & results rounds 2-7

Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
 
Shabalov (2606)
  Navara (2707)
Navara (2707)  
Karjakin (2723)
Karjakin (2723)    
  Karjakin (2723)    
Timofeev (2651)  
Karjakin (2723)
Sakaev (2626)    
  Sakaev (2626)    
Radjabov (2748)      
Vitiugov (2694)    
Vitiugov (2694)    
  Vitiugov (2694)    
Milos (2603)  
Karjakin (2723)
Cheparinov (2671)    
  Bologan (2692)    
Bologan (2692)      
Laznicka (2637)    
Morozevich (2750)        
  Laznicka (2637)        
Laznicka (2637)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Milov (2652)    
  Mamedyarov (2719)    
Mamedyarov (2719)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Wang Hao (2708)    
  Wang Hao (2708)    
Ganguly (2654)  
Gelfand (2758)
Meier (2653)  
  Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)    
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Yu Yangyi (2527)      
  Yu Yangyi (2527)      
Bartel (2618)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Amonatov (2631)      
  Gelfand (2758)      
Gelfand (2758)        
Gelfand (2758)      
Polgar (2680)      
  Polgar (2680)      
Nisipeanu (2677)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Iturrizaga (2605)  
  Jobava (2696)  
Jobava (2696)    
Grischuk (2736)  
Grischuk (2736)      
  Grischuk (2736)      
Tkachiev (2642)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Sandipan (2623)  
  Jakovenko (2736)  
Jakovenko (2736)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Rublevsky (2697)  
  Areshchenko (2664)  
Areshchenko (2664)
 
Sasikiran (2664)
  Bacrot (2700)
Bacrot (2700)  
Bacrot (2700)
Wang Yue (2734)    
  Wang Yue (2734)    
Savchenko (2644)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Akobian (2624)    
  Ponomariov (2739)    
Ponomariov (2739)      
Ponomariov (2739)    
Motylev (2695)    
  Motylev (2695)    
Najer (2695  
Ponomariov (2739)
Li Chao (2596)    
  Li Chao (2596)    
Pelletier (2589)      
Gashimov (2758)    
Gashimov (2758)        
  Gashimov (2758)        
Zhou Jianchao (2629      
Gashimov (2758)    
Caruana (2652)    
  Caruana (2652)    
Dominguez (2719)      
Caruana (2652)    
Alekseev (2715)    
  Alekseev (2715)    
Fressinet (2653)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Khalifman (2612)  
  Tomashevsky (2708)  
Tomashevsky (2708)    
Shirov (2719)  
Shirov (2719)      
  Shirov (2719)      
Fedorchuk (2619)    
Svidler (2754)  
Nyback (2628)      
  Svidler (2754)      
Svidler (2754)        
Svidler (2754)      
Naiditsch (2689)      
  Naiditsch (2689)      
Onischuk (2672)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Zhou Weiqi (2603)  
  Kamsky (2695)  
Kamsky (2695)    
So (2640)  
Ivanchuk (2739)      
  So (2640)      
So (2640)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Inarkiev (2645)  
  Eljanov (2729)  
Eljanov (2729)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Malakhov (2706)  
  Malakhov (2706)  
Smirin (2662)



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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

ChessGirl's picture

Zee, it´s "G" for Girl, I would say.

You´ve got a point there, Merijn ;)

IM Merijn van Delft's picture

Nevermind ELO, reaching the final must be good for your EGO!

Zee's picture

Anyone know is "G"elfand pronounced like "G"irl or like "J"elly ?

Thanks-Z

ChessGirl's picture

Yes I absolutely agree with you Thomas, but I took that into consideration when I wrote my first message: What I mean is that probably Gelfand and Ponomariov played with a dynamic that is probably best for this kind of tournaments: solid, trying not to take too many risks, they both went to tie-breaks quite a few times. However, if you follow this "recipe for success" that will supposedly take you to the final, you do get to the final, but the best strategy actually cost you ELO points (as you mentioned, Gelfand´s points are mainly from last round).
However, other players like Mamedyarov earned some good ELO points but fell in the way.
That is what I find ironical, especially if you add the fact that, if Ponomariov loses in the final, there will probably be no special consideration towards him as World Cup finalist when it comes to inviting players to tournaments, etc., since this consideration will probably go only to the winner, as in the case of the Candidates Tournament, and on the other hand, his rating will be negatively affected (he can still lose a few points in the final). So I wonder... is it any better in that case for a player to reach the final than to lose in the quarter-final?

Thomas's picture

Slight addition to prove my point: Mamedyarov didn't play any tiebreaks and gained 15.6 ELO points from the event ... .

marpada's picture

It would have been interesting seen Malakhov in the final because of his uncompromising style. I hope he can get some invitations to super tournaments to see some new flesh.

I can't say Pono does not deserve the achievement, he's a heck of a fighter!!

Thomas's picture

@ChessGirl: I get your irony, but actually "all" one has to do to avoid losing ELO is beat lower-rated opponents in the (rated) classical games, rather than relying on tiebreaks. Moreover, a look at changes in the live rating list suggests that you have to stay in the tournament for long to limit the damage to your ELO!? These are the changes since the start of the World Cup:

Gelfand +3.8 (but only because he beat Karjakin 2-0)
Ponomariov -2.0
Karjakin -2.8 (also due to his result against Gelfand)
Malakhov +10.8 (a special case: he played three higher-rated opponents - Eljanov, Svidler and Ponomariov - scoring 3.5/6)

Ivanchuk -4.0
Radjabov -5.0
Morozevich -9.8

And I guess prize money is a nice compensation .... . BTW, whoever wins the final, maybe it is not fair that he gets much more than the "runner-up" (96,000$ vs. 64,000$), at least if this match will also be decided in rapid or blitz games. The winner will have additional guaranteed income from the candidates tournament .... .

PolGer's picture

Dear Chessfriends

If we look at all those FIDE- knock-outs from Lusanne ´98 to Khanty-Mansiysk ´09 and if we give 10 points to the winner, 5 to the runner-up, 3 for the semifinal and finally 1 point to the each player in quarter-final than we have something like this

Anand 23
Ponomajarov 21 (or 26)
Adams 16
Shirov 13
Khalifman 11
Gelfand 10 (or 15)
Aronjan 10
Kamsky 10
Kasimdshadov 10
Grischuk 7
Akopian 6
Ivanschuk 5
.... and many many more (including some really BIG ones!)

I hope that I had not missed any important results. ;) Just in case take my honest apology for that.

Impressive record by Ponomajarov, isn’t it!

Jan's picture

Yea.. lasting longer should be rewarded by elopoints :-)

Not sure if we talk about the same thing..

ChessGirl's picture
ChessGirl's picture

The thing I find funny about this KO system is that lasting for longer sometimes gives the dubious reward of actually losing ELO points, as is more or less the case :)

PolGer's picture

Dear Chessfriends

If we look at all those FIDE- knock-out´s from Lusanne ´98 to Khanty-Mansiysk ´09 and if we give 10 points to the winner, 5 to runner-up, 3 for the semifinal and finally 1 point to the player in quarter-final than we have something like this

Anand 23
Ponomajarov 21 (or 26)
Adams 16
Shirov 13
Khalifman 11
Gelfand 10 (or 15)
Aronjan 10
Kamsky 10
Kasimdshadov 10
Grischuk 7
Akopian 6
Ivanschuk 5
.... and many many more (including some really BIG ones)

I hope that I had not missed any important results. ;) Just in case take my honest apology for that.

Impressive record by Ponomajarov, isn’t it!

Zee's picture

@ChessGirl - Thanks!

ops's picture

gelfand second game. there are 3 games after move 16 in database and all 3 games won by white. that it means gelfand will win today?

Thomas's picture

@ops: The answer is "no" - you never win a game by resigning, nor by accepting a draw offer :)

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