Reports | August 02, 2008 18:37

Sochi R2: Aronian, Cheparinov & Kamsky win

It was a strange sight, at five minutes past three: only half of the players were sitting behind their boards. Fortunately everybody arrived in the end (last was Jakovenko, 12 minutes late) to create a good round, with wins by Aronian, Cheparinov & Kamsky.

It was a bit of a coincidence, because during lunch, I was having a discussion with Peter Svidler about the rule for arriving late at chess tournaments. As you may know, during the Olympiad in Dresden, it is not allowed to arrive later at the board than... the moment the round starts. Not half an hour, not fifteen minutes, not a minute is allowed.

A draconic measure, and ridiculous to implement for the first time during such a huge event as an Olympiad, was Svidler's opinion. "It's just impossible with all those players in busses, with the traffic in such a big city and all..." I agree with him, just like I agree that one hour is not really necessary either.

However, my first reaction was to argue in favour of Dresden's rule, because it's simply unacceptable when photographers are not able to take pictures. Many top players (and arbiters!) underestimate the power of publicity, I'm afraid. Later on, we settled the agreement that at least such measures should be implemented step by step, and so half an hour in Dresden and e.g. fifteen minutes at tournaments afterwards would be fine I guess.

And so it was funny to see all those empty chess boards at 15:05 hrs, but it couldn't have been the case that the players were avoiding the photographers, since there almost aren't any! It must have been some last-minute preparation that kept them away. Jakovenko-Radjabov was the last game to start, and naturally also the last to finish. ;-)

Round 2 results
Kamsky - Ivanchuk 1-0
Aronian - Navara 1-0
Karjakin - Wang Yue ?Ǭ?-?Ǭ?
Al-Modiahki - Grischuk ?Ǭ?-?Ǭ?
Jakovenko - Radjabov ?Ǭ?-?Ǭ?
Gashimov - Gelfand ?Ǭ?-?Ǭ?
Svidler - Cheparinov ?Ǭ?-?Ǭ?

[table=334]

After Ilyumzhinov and Karpov had left (did I mention that Anatoly Yevgenyevich was playing blitz for hours during the first round, with Emil Sutovsky?), the atmosphere during the second round was as quiet as the during the first, although enough excitement was to be found in the games themselves. The first player to appear in the press room was Gata Kamsky, who had all the reason to smile: he had just outplayed the great Ivanchuk, leaving the Ukrainian no chance at all.


Karjakin-Wang Yue wasn't very exciting; Karjakin decided to repeat his opening, but not the rest of his play against the same opponent at the first GP in Baku, which meant he didn't lose a drawn ending, but drew it. Then Aronian and Navara arrived; it looked like the Armenian had won his game right out of the opening (even GM Shipov thought so) but in reality Black is probably doing fine after 23...Qd6.


Svidler, who was one of the players arriving on time actually, clearly played under his normal level. Cheparinov surprised him by playing the Berlin Wall - something Svidler must know a few things about, as he worked with Kramnik a lot. He did reach a small plus out of the opening but after a big mistake it was suddenly over.

Al-Modiahki gained some confidence by comfortably drawing Grischuk, even after enjoying some initiative for a while in a French Winawer. The Petroff in Gashimov-Gelfand was a rare one, but the result was not a surprise. Jakovenko-Radjabov was the most interesting draw of the day; another fine performance by Radjabov in a King's Indian which probably should have delivered him a full point, but around the first time control he let it slip away.


All photos ?Ǭ© Mark Gluhovsky. Below you'll find the games of the second round (with commentary by GM Sergey Shipov and myself), followed by videos by Robert Fontaine and G?ɬ©rard Demuydt of Europe-Echecs.

Links:

Share |
Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Chris's picture

Are there any complete videos from the press conferences? I can see this huge commentary board but could not find a video of a complete analysis done on it....

peter's picture

There haven't been many press conferences in English here. Unfortunately I can't really influence that.

Stephan's picture

I am really disappointed. I enjoyed the coverage of the FIDE Media Team of the Grand Prix Tournament in Baku. I was happy that they finally realized that they have to invest some money for the chess fans who enjoy the games without knowing all to much what is going on when Super-GMs play, Those player interviews, the press condererens and the post-game-video-analysis of GM Azmaiparashvili were just a great service for the chess fans and i got the impression that FIDE finally understood how to promote the royal game. Therefore i really looked forward to the second event and what happens? Instead of extending those services (perhaps a live commentary via internet) they simply don't offer any of the mentioned services anymore. I don't know if I expect to much but the finacial costs of this services shouldn't be to much for such a big organization like FIDE. And the big man himself, Mr. Kok, mentioned in an interview, how important those services were to make chess more interessting for a greater public. So I can't understand this step backwards and hope that they return to their great media concept of the first Grand Prix in the future.

Eiae's picture

I am quite dissappointed too. It doesn't look like Global Chess understands how to promote their events.
Where are the live commentaries, where are the live cameras, where are the interviews with the players? Where is the media??
This is supposed to be FIDE and Global Chess' shot at making something outstanding in the world of chess, but it seems to me that they fail miserably. I just hope the players will make this a great event, so the old-time chess public will at least be entertained by the online relays. This will not attract new people, though.
Looks like the Grand Slam cycle will win in the long run and maybe they will even decide who will be the champs of the future. Well done Danailov.

peter's picture

I understand and I'll try to explain. Firstly, it's not really about money. Most importantly, the media team that was doing all those reports, couldn't be here because they are working at the World Youth in Turkey. I think the Europe-Echecs team is an excellent alternative. The coverage of Baku was better than usual, but the problem was also that because of an overload of videos, many people didn't watch any video. One round report a day is better I think, atlhough I can imagine that some of you wish for more. You can never satisfy everybody at the same time...

Eiae's picture

Global Chess is flunking it.

They needed to promote the Grand Prix as a top event in chess. Now it's just some tournament in Russia you can follow live.
Where are the live cameras? The live commentaries? The live interviews? Where is the media? Top tournaments should have those things these days if they want to make an impact.
I hopre the players will at least make this an event to be remembered.

Stephan's picture

Okay I understand. This europe-echecs stuff is really very good and they deliver high quality round reports. And its certainly not necessary that Mr. Azmaiparashivili comments on every boring draw. And some of those press conferenes weren't that great either (no critcism to the players, not everybody is born to give great interviews which are not held in their native language and after all they are there to play chess). But if Baku was as you say too much coverage Sochi is in my opinion far to less. I can remember that the chess fans on this site greatly admired the coverage of Baku and were as suprised as I, that FIDE did something reasonable for a change. Perhaps there can be found a adequate compromise in the future, a GM commenting on interessting games afterwards for example. And it would also not be bad to show sometimes a full analysis of one of the players on the demo board if they do it good, understandable and in a entertaining manner. Mr. Aronian and Radjabov are capable of this for example, if only one could slow down the latter a bit ;-). Tthe videos are recorded anyway, so why not make them available? Of course i do not know what amount of editing is necessary to do this, but if its not too much work, I would appreciate it very much.

arne's picture

"Gata only showed his utmost skill - there aren't many people who can beat a genius in such a style"

Indeed, but it sure does help that Kamksy himself is a genius too! :-)

Andy's picture

"... the media team that was doing all those reports, couldn?¢‚Ǩ‚Ñ¢t be here because they are working at the World Youth in Turkey."

:o

Then get another team?!?!, :S

arkansaw's picture

I think this event is being under-covered for some unknown reason.... at chessdom, there is hardly anything about it despite after 3 rounds, unlike the time at Baku. Same thing at chessbase, at the time of this posting they only have reports of round 1

tim gluckman's picture

I am definitely opposed to this new rule about arriving late. Peter wrote <> (my emphasis). Does that mean that the editor of 'Chess Vibes' has now changed his mind? In my humble opinion (IMHO) this is a terrible rule which is part of a general attempt to micro-manage people's lives.
And if "they" can impose it on grandmasters, they can do it to everyone. I wou?ɬ?ld rather do without a few photos -- which are only duplications of existing snaps anyway -- and retain the freedom. Going off message for a moment: thinking back to the "bad old days" of Communism in which people lived in complete unfreedom, at least they had the freedom to arrive at the board when they wanted. Oh sorry I forgot, this is freedom! this is democracy!

peter's picture

@tim I'm afraid you're also underestimating the power of publicity. Suppose Mr Borg of Global Chess has successfully interested a big sponsor, let's say Pepsi (who are actually sponsoring in Sochi). The CEO visits the tournament on the first day (which wasn't the case btw) and wonders why not all the players arrived in time. He doesn't ask, but when he's in Japan the next morning for business, he likes to read about this tournament he sponsors. He learns that his favourite player has won, but there's no picture of the game (with Pepsi in the background), and he calls the tournament organizer to find out that it's because the players weren't there yet! Imagine what Mr Pepsi will do next time. Perhaps not exactly like this, but something like this could happen I think.

And btw free will? What is this??

arne's picture

I think the problem is that different parties involved in this, have different interests. The players are interested in publicity only on a long-term level, but the sponsors and journalists want publicity right now. The public wants to see the players, of course, but they also like their particular 'habits' - Kramnik is always late, Navara is always behind his board 15 minutes before the game. It's what gives the players their personality - if they all behave the same way, it just wouldn't be the same. And, of course, sometimes 5 minutes less on the clock can be compensated by just giving some complex home-prepared variation a final check in your hotel room. If the prepared novelty works out, it's also the sponsors and the public that benefit from it. A poorly prepared player makes a clumsy impression on anyone - isn't that worth arriving 5 minutes late? These are tricky questions, and there's so single 'right' answer. That's why perhaps it's best to leave things as they are. In any case, I wouldn't say publicity is the decisive factor in all this. It's just one of them.

peter's picture

Don't think the argument of the 'last check in the hotel room' makes sense. Players simply have to get used to the fact that they have to finish their work in time, to be able to leave their room in time. Isn't that just part of professionalism? And, to follow your other (not very strong, imo) argument, is the difference between arriving fifteen minutes early or two second before the gong enough "difference in personality"?

Always late to work's picture

@tim gluckman

What does your boss say when you are late for work? I'm sure he is delighted by your freedom and democracy speach. LOL

They are PROFESSIONALS and this is their work! So yes, it is very reasonable to expect them to arrive at time for the games, photo shooting, press conferences, interviews and everything else that comes with it. If they don't want to play, then they can decide not to, just like you can quit your job if you don't feel like doing it.

Besides, you don't see for example a football or a tennis match getting delayed because some player(s) are late, do you?

Always late to work's picture

Good one arne!

Next time I will explain my boss that it's my personality :)

arne's picture

Ah, but seeing chess players as professionals is just one (very narrow-minded) way of looking at it. I don't think most spectators go to a chess tournament to see a bunch of professionals working together - they might come to my office instead to see that. But unlike the work I do for my boss, chess is also art, it has the power to make individuals happy. Chess players are surely not only professionals, but also artists. And artists deserve a little 'artistic license', I think. Was Jim Morrison a professional? Picasso? Did Chopin ever attend a press conference? Surely there's more to chess than just professionalism.
By the way, there already is a penalty for arriving too late in chess: you lose on time. Isn't one penalty enough?

Always late to work's picture

You can then use the same argument for footballers, tennis players and just about any top athlet in any sport.

Afterall maybe you are an "artist" on your specific area of work.

Always late to work's picture

It's all very simple: If the game is scheduled to start at 15:00 then it should start in 15:00 with both players present.

arne's picture

@Always. Any comparison with tennis or soccer is heavily flawed for obvious reasons. Indeed, if one soccer team prefers to be late 15 minutes, I'm sure the other team wouldn't object at all. But it will never happen because the opponents have scored 100 goals in the meantime.

Eiae's picture

No matter what the event is, sports or anything else, professional or not, it's simply considered rude to arrive late if you do it deliberately.
Chess have a timer running, which seems to make people think it's suddenly alright to keep everybody else waiting.
It's a very bad habit that chess should get rid of, especially at top level where a potentially large audience is involved.

Always late to work's picture

1) The referee wouldn't allow a football game to begin, without all 11 men from both teams being on a pitch. He even signals to both goal-keepers that the game will begin. I imagine that a team that would be late for a Champion's league game without a VERY GOOD reason would be severly penalised (probably expelled for next 2 or 3 years).

2) Even if the game without one team present would begin, they could only score one goal at most. The team that conceeded the goal has to kick-off from the center ;)

arne's picture

Yeah well, in chess you also have to be silent. Every game has its own set of rules. That's only charming, isn't it? What's the use of changing existing rules just because it's the same in other sports?
Anyway, it seems to me the argument 'it's good for publicity' is completely different from the argument 'it's good manners'. Both are valid, but they're not connected. If you want publicity, get Kosteniuk to play or make sure you invite players who play interesting chess, rather than quick draws. As for good manners, perhaps FIDE should start gving the right example before imposing dubious rules on others.

Always late to work's picture

So unlike other sportlers, chess players can come up to one hour late AND they can decide to stop playing when they feel like (agreeing to a draw). What on earth did the chess players do to deserve all those privileges???

Showing up punctually to the start of the game is the minimum what we can demand from them. Yes, this really is a radical change of the rules, huh? :p

Martin Glimmerveen's picture

Arne, I dont think both arent connected. As starters, its common sense to be on time. It goes for every profession/appointment/sports, everything. Indeed, in chess you get a time-penalty for this 'rudeness'. But there is a more global interest: which is publicity. This is needed to keep the public and sponsors interested. Hence, this is a responsibility of the players.

This doesnt mean the FIDE rule is brought very well, but the idea is fairly logical. I dont think it should be a global rule though. I mean, for my regular competition match I dont deem it necessary. There are no sponsors involved and also the odds of people taking a lot of precautions and still coming - say - 10 minutes late due to traffic jams, parking problems etc. is very high. Then it should be enough to have somewhat time less on their clocks.
But for a world championship, or a mega-tourney like Corus this is different.

arne's picture

I just don't understand why anyone, spectator, organiser or sponsor, should care whether a player is late or not. Chess players get paid to play good moves, not to behave like well-trained pupils. By the way, it's the same in any profession. Who cares if you're 15 minutes late at the office - as long as the work gets properly done, no? Who cares if Kasparov showed up late when he beat Topalov in Wijk aan Zee, 1997? Who cares if Ivanchuk picked his nose right before he played Qg7!! against Shirov? Or whether Shirov was wearing a tie when he played ...Re4!! against Kramnik. Any sponsor that focuses on these trifles surely hasn't understood why he is spending all his money.

Always late to work's picture

I guess you, like everyone else is looking forward to the WCC match between Anand and Kramnik. You take a day off and buy a (expensive) ticket to watch the game live. You go to the playing hall at 14.00 when the game is about to start, however the players are not there. You wait and wait and wait, but nothng happens. Later it turns out that Anand had a bad horoscope and Kramnik had a fight with his wife and they just weren't capabla to put down an "artistic" performance and the game was later played in the middle of the night (when they were in the mood) or was just called off.

I guess you don't see anything wrong with this picture, huh?

Things just can't work this way. Not in private life, and not in competition or bussiness, or in any other aspect of life.

Lajos Arpad's picture

Chess is for the players. Sponsors and the public helps the players to get money, but chess is not only business. I would play at tournaments even if i couldn't win money with my play (without sponsors), because i'm a Player. Those who wants to dictate the grandmasters's life are not seeing the point of playing chess. Chess is a logical food, an Art. We should respect the greatest players and not wine for their habits. Football and tennis are not chess, they are totally different things, so just stop this ridiculous comparison.

Always late to work's picture

Chess is for players. Basketball is for players, tennis is for players, golf is for players,...

While they are all completely different sports, they are by no means different in the aspect that we couldn't expect the players to appear punctually for the start of the game. In this aspect chess is no different than any other sport. And I'm not talking about friendly games in the park (if your friends tolerate you to always be late, then by all means....) I'm talking about professional tournaments.

No, it's not just me who say thant things can't work like this. And don't tell me that it doesn't bother you if you make an appointment with someone and then that person doesn't show up on time. Don't tell me that it doesn't bother you if the football/basketball/tennis/whatever game isn't on TV when it is supposed to be.

And by the way: The world does suck.

Always late to work's picture

Chess is for players. Basketball is for players, tennis is for players, golf is for players,...all sport is for players.

While they are all completely different sports, they are by no means different in the aspect that we couldn't expect the players to appear punctually for the start of the game. In this aspect chess is no different than any other sport. And I'm not talking about friendly games in the park (if your friends tolerate you to always be late, then by all means....) I'm talking about professional tournaments.

No, it's not just me who say thant things can't work like this. And don't tell me that it doesn't bother you if you make an appointment with someone and then that person doesn't show up on time. Don't tell me that it doesn't bother you if the football/basketball/tennis/whatever game isn't on TV when it is supposed to be.

And by the way: The world does suck.

arne's picture

So because you, Always late to work, declares it can't work that way, it shouldn't work that way? It reminds me of people who say 'the world just sucks'. The only good thing: it makes all further discussion useless.

Latest articles