Reports | December 03, 2009 4:08

World Cup: Gashimov, Gelfand, Jakovenko, Malakhov and Ponomariov also through

After Karjakin, Mamedyarov and Svidler, today five more players qualified for the World Cup's quarter-finals: Gashimov, Gelfand, Jakovenko, Malakhov and Ponomariov. Pairings for tomorrow's 6th round: Karjakin-Mamedyarov, Gelfand-Jakovenko, Ponomariov-Gashimov and Svidler-Malakhov.

The FIDE World Chess Cup takes place November 20th-December 15th inn Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It's a seven-round knockout with six rounds of matches comprising two games per round. The final seventh round consists of four games.

Round 1 (November 21-23): 128 players Round 5 (December 3-5): 8 players
Round 2 (November 24-26): 64 players Round 6 (December 6-8): 4 players
Round 3 (November 27-29): 32 players Round 7 (December 10-14): 2 players
Round 4 (November 30-December 2): 16 players


The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move from move one. Games start at 15:00h local time (11:00 CET).

Complete results round 4

World Cup 2009 | Tiebreak results round 4

Tiebreaks round 4

The biggest surprise perhaps on this last day of round 4 was the elimination of Alexander Grischuk by his compatriot Dmitry Jakovenko. The reason is that this elimination took place in a (dramatic!) blitz phase, where Grischuk, as an ex-World Blitz Champion, should be considered the favourite. (Last month he finished shared 5th at the World Blitz together with Svidler and Ponomariov, who are still in the race in Khanty-Mansiysk.)

After their two very quick draws in the classical games, the four rapid games all were fairly equal as well. But then the fireworks began In the first blitz game, Grischuk was clearly less concentrated than Jakovenko, probably missing both the Nd7-b6-d5 manoeuvre and the Qd3+Rb1 idea. Although he missed a mate in three on move 42, Jakovenko had no trouble winning the ending two pawns up.

Dmitry Jakovenko is through

However, in the second game Grischuk came close to levelling the score. 55.Re3? was a big mistake that allowed 55...Bd3!, locking up the rook.

58...Kf2 is curtains here, but instead Grischuk collapsed and created a self-mate a problem composer would be proud of. An unfortunate anti-climax of this match between two very strong Russian players.

Not in best blitz shape today: Alexander Grischuk

Of the other tiebreak matches, only Gelfand-Vachier-Lagrave reached the blitz games too, and these were no less dramatic. It's hard to say why the young French grandmaster refrained from the obvious 55.c6 in the first one, which would have given excellent winning chances. Instead, Gelfand grabbed his chance to activate his king and save the game. In the second blitz game Vachier-Lagrave simply got crushed.

The third rapid game between Vachier-Lagrave and Gelfand

Caruana started strongly against his Gashimov; his bishop sacrifice was entirely correct.

However, here he missed the strong follow-up 21.Qf5+! Rf6 22.Qd3! after which 22....Re6 is forced. White can win the piece back with a drawn position or continue attacking with 23.Rd1 Be7 24.Qxh7. In the game the Black king just walked away; 25...Qe8! was nice though 25...Qg8 is the same. In game 2 Caruana was outplayed while in game 3 Gashimov drew a pawn ending, showing his knowledge of the theory of corresponding squares.

Vugar Gashimov sends Fabiano Caruana home

To our surprise, Wesley So lost all three rapid games against Malakhov, and so the three youngest players left the World Cup today. The first was simply a very strong game by Malakhov, but in the second So got a promising position out of the opening. Perhaps 13.e6 was a bit too much however, and far in the endgame the Philippine avoided move repetition to even lose a drawn position. Winning with Black against Malakhov's ultra-solid 1.d4 game was too much to ask.

The story is over for Wesley So; Vladimir Malakhov is through

After some missed chances yesterday, Ponomariov did knock out Bacrot today. The match was decided in the 4th rapid game, which started fine for the French GM. Black is at least equal after 30...axb4, and 39...h5? was unnecessary. 43.Ke3! would have won quicker but when Bacrot missed 45...Ra5 it was over anyway.

Ruslan Ponomariov eliminates Etienne Bacrot

The pairings for tomorrow’s 6th round are Karjakin-Mamedyarov, Gelfand-Jakovenko, Ponomariov-Gashimov and Svidler-Malakhov. These quarter-finals, as well as the semis, will still be played over two classical games only. The final will consist of four.

All photos by Galina Popova | courtesy of FIDE

Tiebreak games round 4

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup - Pairings & results rounds 2-7

Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
 
Shabalov (2606)
  Navara (2707)
Navara (2707)  
Karjakin (2723)
Karjakin (2723)    
  Karjakin (2723)    
Timofeev (2651)  
Karjakin (2723)
Sakaev (2626)    
  Sakaev (2626)    
Radjabov (2748)      
Vitiugov (2694)    
Vitiugov (2694)    
  Vitiugov (2694)    
Milos (2603)  
Cheparinov (2671)    
  Bologan (2692)    
Bologan (2692)      
Laznicka (2637)    
Morozevich (2750)        
  Laznicka (2637)        
Laznicka (2637)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Milov (2652)    
  Mamedyarov (2719)    
Mamedyarov (2719)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Wang Hao (2708)    
  Wang Hao (2708)    
Ganguly (2654)  
Meier (2653)  
  Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)    
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Yu Yangyi (2527)      
  Yu Yangyi (2527)      
Bartel (2618)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Amonatov (2631)      
  Gelfand (2758)      
Gelfand (2758)        
Gelfand (2758)      
Polgar (2680)      
  Polgar (2680)      
Nisipeanu (2677)    
 
Iturrizaga (2605)  
  Jobava (2696)  
Jobava (2696)    
Grischuk (2736)  
Grischuk (2736)      
  Grischuk (2736)      
Tkachiev (2642)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Sandipan (2623)  
  Jakovenko (2736)  
Jakovenko (2736)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Rublevsky (2697)  
  Areshchenko (2664)  
Areshchenko (2664)
 
Sasikiran (2664)
  Bacrot (2700)
Bacrot (2700)  
Bacrot (2700)
Wang Yue (2734)    
  Wang Yue (2734)    
Savchenko (2644)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Akobian (2624)    
  Ponomariov (2739)    
Ponomariov (2739)      
Ponomariov (2739)    
Motylev (2695)    
  Motylev (2695)    
Najer (2695  
Li Chao (2596)    
  Li Chao (2596)    
Pelletier (2589)      
Gashimov (2758)    
Gashimov (2758)        
  Gashimov (2758)        
Zhou Jianchao (2629      
Gashimov (2758)    
Caruana (2652)    
  Caruana (2652)    
Dominguez (2719)      
Caruana (2652)    
Alekseev (2715)    
  Alekseev (2715)    
Fressinet (2653)  
Khalifman (2612)  
  Tomashevsky (2708)  
Tomashevsky (2708)    
Shirov (2719)  
Shirov (2719)      
  Shirov (2719)      
Fedorchuk (2619)    
Svidler (2754)  
Nyback (2628)      
  Svidler (2754)      
Svidler (2754)        
Svidler (2754)      
Naiditsch (2689)      
  Naiditsch (2689)      
Onischuk (2672)    
 
Zhou Weiqi (2603)  
  Kamsky (2695)  
Kamsky (2695)    
So (2640)  
Ivanchuk (2739)      
  So (2640)      
So (2640)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Inarkiev (2645)  
  Eljanov (2729)  
Eljanov (2729)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Malakhov (2706)  
  Malakhov (2706)  
Smirin (2662)



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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

Chess.com

Comments

Thomas's picture

Tomorrow ChessGirl's prediction will be tested: How does Mamedyarov react to, how will he deal with his first loss in the tournament?

test's picture

I happened to be following that blitz game between Jakovenko & Grischuk live.
What a game.
At first it looked like a draw. Bishops of opposite, how can he win this? Oh no, Black is winning, unbelievable! Oh no, black is MATED. Even more unbelievable.

I wouldn't have called it an anti-climax though. ;) (Ok, it's a pity it had to be decided in blitz, but after all, they had 2 classical games and 4 rapid games to settle the matter, if that doesn't do it, what else is there? At least they don't use Armageddon, that really is unfair.)

Jens Kristiansen's picture

You may notice that now all the kids are out. By "kids" meaning those who are not yet matured men.
This is an extremely tough tournament, some kind of a "chess-marathon" and it takes stamina. So, over all top-chess is still a game for the matured, no matter how ingenious these kids are. As a matter of fact that also still goes for the true top-events, apart from some exceptions.
Remember last edition in 2007? The two wunder-kinds, Carlsen and Karjakin, were busted in the semifinals by Kamsky and Shirov.
And for the quarterfinals we are once again back to the "colledted works of Tolstoj". Not that I mind that, great players they are, but there is not that much new under the sun.

Thomas's picture

@Jens Kristiansen: I think you exaggerate a bit:
- Karjakin is now an established player, but still rather young (*1990)
- Gashimov is a, if not THE rising star of the last one or two years (even if there was more hype around, for example, Nakamura)
- Malakhov is a relative unknown. I asked about him on Dailydirt: he isn't even a professional player, but working fulltime as a nuclear engineer.
That's three out of eight ... .
And I would say "anything can happen" in the remaining rounds - copying what I wrote at Mig Greengard's site:

Some fun statistics about FIDE knockout events: Who made it into the quarterfinals? Numbers reflect seeding, the eventual winner is mentioned by name behind his number:

1999 - 1,2,5,16,27,31,36(Khalifman),46
2000 - 1(Anand),3,4,7,8,21,26,46
2002 - 1,4,5,6,7,9,15,19(Ponomariov)
2004 - 1,3,4,11,18,28(Kasimdzhanov),58,73
2005 - 2,3(Aronian),4,5,9,17,38,39
2007 - 5,8,10,11(Kamsky),13,14,17,31
2009 - 1,2,3,7,9,12,13,22

Nakamura fan's picture

@Thomas

Former winners Anand, Aronian, and Kamsky are 3 of the strongest players of the decade. 5 out of 7 years the number 1 seed made it to the quarterfinals. This year the top 3 seeds all made it. It's not that unpredictable.

Thomas's picture

@Nakamura fan: Anand and Aronian - among the strongest players of the decade, no doubt about it. Not that sure already about Kamsky (he was #11 seed in the last World Cup ...) - but even if we include him, that's three tournaments out of six in the list.

Ponomariov was "rising star" in 2002 (then 19 years old) and apparently always does well in KO events - the only player that reached the quarter finals in 2005, 2007 and 2009.

But Khalifman and Kasimdzhanov were, with all respect, absolute outsiders and had their "once in a lifetime" tournaments. Malakhov could be the next one - empirically spoken, he has a reasonable chance to win the World Cup!?

chess's picture

wow malakhov won today. what a game. his knight and rook not developed and still wins:) with last move promotion in knight:) realy funny game.

unknown's picture

As I said few days ago... Karjakin will be 1st real opponent for Mamedyarov.

chess's picture

Karjakin -Mamedyarov
this endgame with rooks, pawns should be draw, but s.o blunders. for example
48...Rb2 49.Kg6 Kd8 50.Kxg5 Ke7 51.Kg6 Ra2 52.Rf5 Rc2 53.Rf7+ Kd6 54.f4
Rg2+ 55.Kf6 Kxc6 56.f5 Kd6 57.Re7 c5 58.Re6+ Kd5 59.Rxa6
Rg8 60.Ra7 Kd6 61.a6 c4 62.Rb7 c3 63.Rb1Kd5 64.Rc1 Kc4 65.Ke7 Ra8 66.f6 Ra7+ 67.Kf8 Rxa6 68.f7 Kd3 69.Kg7=
but they dont have tablebases:) during games.

Nakamura fan's picture

@Thomas Kamsky just lost to Topalov last year for the right to play Anand for the World Championship. He went further than Carlsen or Aronian. Until someone else makes to the semi-finals of the next World Championship cycle, he is #3 in the world in terms of world championship cycles. If we go back more than a decade,

"Kamsky reached the finals of the 1994-1995 PCA World Championship Candidates' matches, eliminating Vladimir Kramnik and Nigel Short before losing to Viswanathan Anand. In the simultaneous FIDE Candidates he met with even greater success, defeating Paul Van der Sterren, Anand and Valery Salov and qualifying for a match with Anatoli Karpov."

He's obviously one of the top players of the last 15 years.

Nakamura fan's picture

@ Nakamura fan: "Until someone else makes to the semi-finals of the next World Championship cycle, he is #3 in the world in terms of world championship cycles."

The finals would have been more accurate.

ed's picture

Now only the big boys with 2700s are left.

Nakamura fan's picture

@ Ed "Now only the big boys with 2700s are left."

Agreed. There's so much young talent. There are 35 2700 rated players and 21 are under 30. They may be top 10 someday, but it's difficult for me imagine anyone outside the top 20 surpassing talents such as Carlsen, Aronian, Gashimov, Radjabov, Ponomariov, Grischuk, Jakovenko, Yue Wang, Eljanov, Karjakin, and Mamedyarov. Aronian won't turn 40 until 2022!

Thomas's picture

@christos: I wrote "relative", compared to the other 7 remaining players who all have played in supertournaments before. Of course it would have been a much bigger upset and surprise if - for example - one of the Egyptian participants was still in competition by now (but rather predictably, all were eliminated in the first round).

Nakamura fan's picture

I'm doing a little research and discovered that with Black Gata Kamsky beat Magnus Carlsen 6 to 4, with 6 draws. Here's nice win by Vladimir Malakhov over Francisco Vallejo-Pons. The game is FIDE World Cup 2005 Sicilian Defense: Najdorf. Zagreb (Fianchetto) Variation (B91) 1-0. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1378789

Radical Caveman's picture

Not only are all the remaining players over 2700 (and 7 of 8 are in the top 20), but all of them were born in the Soviet Union. Gelfand of Israel is a Belarus expatriot, and the others are all representing Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan.

But for the knockout format, it's almost like harkening back to the 80's or earlier. A bit dreary for my tastes, but we'll be seeing some very strong chess...

Jens Kristiansen's picture

Thanks, fellows for some usefull statistics and informations. There are indeed a lot of very talented VERY young players around now a days, "chess-kids" so to say, meaning they are still not adults and matured and fullgrown, a stage you first reach at the age of 18-20.
My point is that it seems that over all these kids do not stand the pressure in the real tough tournaments. It has probably a lot to do with stamina and endurance, and maybe something else.
You will find it hard to come up with an example of a, say, under-18 player, who has won a genuine top-tournament. Topchess is after all still a game for MEN (and women).

Thomas's picture

@Nakamura fan: Going back more than a decade - i.e. before he quit chess temporarily - says very little about Kamsky's current strength (maybe about the potential he still has?). Just as an example, back then Karpov was still a world-top player .... .

Before his break from chess, Kamsky had numerous successes. After his comeback, winning the World Cup in 2007 was his only major achievement (feel free to correct me if I miss something). His match against Topalov was a direct result of this. Due to some other not-so-good results in the last 12 months he is currently world #41 with ELO2695 .... .

His score against Carlsen is skewed by his 3-1 match victory at the 2005 World Cup - back then, Carlsen was "nothing more than" a promising young prodigy with ELO 2570. Excluding this event and limiting things to classical time controls, we are left with four draws: still respectable, but also reflecting the fact that Carlsen has/had difficulties to beat "Kamsky-type players".

christos (greece)'s picture

@Thomas: I don't agree that Malakhov is a relative unknown. As one can see here (http://ratings.fide.com/id.phtml?event=4120787), he was born in 1980 and he reached 2700 elo already in Jan 2004 (no 18 in the world at the time). Now, with a rating of 2706, 52 points less than the top seed, it is not really a surprise to reach the quarter-finals.
Actually, I had voted for him to win this tournament (before its start) here in chessvibes. Now I regret I did not put a bet on him :)

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