Reports | December 05, 2009 21:42

World Cup: Gelfand and Ponomariov also through

In today's tiebreaks of the World Cup Boris Gelfand eliminated Dmitry Jakovenko while Ruslan Ponomariov knocked out Vugar Gashimov; both winners scored 2.5-0.5 in three rapid games. Tomorrow's semi-finals will see Ponomariov-Malakhov and Karjakin-Gelfand.

The FIDE World Chess Cup takes place November 20th-December 15th inn Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It's a seven-round knockout with six rounds of matches comprising two games per round. The final seventh round consists of four games.

Round 1 (November 21-23): 128 players Round 5 (December 3-5): 8 players
Round 2 (November 24-26): 64 players Round 6 (December 6-8): 4 players
Round 3 (November 27-29): 32 players Round 7 (December 10-14): 2 players
Round 4 (November 30-December 2): 16 players


The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move from move one. Games start at 15:00h local time (11:00 CET).

Results round 5

World Cup 2009 | Results round 5

Tiebreaks round 5

Both tiebreak matches in this 5th round were the shortest as was theoretically possible: only three rapid games. By then both Gelfand and Ponomariov had already reached a decisive 2.5-0.5 lead, and so they won their matches 3.5-1.5 against Jakovenko and Gashimov respectively.

The match between Ponomariov and Gashimov was basically decided in the first game - a real thriller. Gashimov got a probably winning advantage with the black pieces; 43...Rb3, 44...Nd6 and 45...Qe7 were all winning moves, objectively speaking. Ponomariov missed a chance at move 45 (where Qb1 is very strong) and 47 (where Rb8 is brilliant) but the last to err was Gashimov. A terrible experience for the Azeri GM, which had its effect on the remainder of the minimatch. Ponomariov outplayed his opponent nicely in game 2 and easily held the draw in game 3, and convincingly qualify for the semis.

This can also be said for Boris Gelfand, who is really in top shape in Khanty Mansiysk. He had no trouble at all qualifying for round 6 in his tiebreak match against Jakovenko. A solid Petroff draw to start with, then a very powerful game with the white pieces followed by another strong Black game - Gelfand was clearly the strongest.

All photos by Galina Popova | courtesy of FIDE

Games tiebreaks round 5

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup - Pairings & results rounds 2-7

Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
 
Shabalov (2606)
  Navara (2707)
Navara (2707)  
Karjakin (2723)
Karjakin (2723)    
  Karjakin (2723)    
Timofeev (2651)  
Karjakin (2723)
Sakaev (2626)    
  Sakaev (2626)    
Radjabov (2748)      
Vitiugov (2694)    
Vitiugov (2694)    
  Vitiugov (2694)    
Milos (2603)  
Karjakin (2723)
Cheparinov (2671)    
  Bologan (2692)    
Bologan (2692)      
Laznicka (2637)    
Morozevich (2750)        
  Laznicka (2637)        
Laznicka (2637)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Milov (2652)    
  Mamedyarov (2719)    
Mamedyarov (2719)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Wang Hao (2708)    
  Wang Hao (2708)    
Ganguly (2654)  
Meier (2653)  
  Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)    
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Yu Yangyi (2527)      
  Yu Yangyi (2527)      
Bartel (2618)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Amonatov (2631)      
  Gelfand (2758)      
Gelfand (2758)        
Gelfand (2758)      
Polgar (2680)      
  Polgar (2680)      
Nisipeanu (2677)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Iturrizaga (2605)  
  Jobava (2696)  
Jobava (2696)    
Grischuk (2736)  
Grischuk (2736)      
  Grischuk (2736)      
Tkachiev (2642)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Sandipan (2623)  
  Jakovenko (2736)  
Jakovenko (2736)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Rublevsky (2697)  
  Areshchenko (2664)  
Areshchenko (2664)
 
Sasikiran (2664)
  Bacrot (2700)
Bacrot (2700)  
Bacrot (2700)
Wang Yue (2734)    
  Wang Yue (2734)    
Savchenko (2644)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Akobian (2624)    
  Ponomariov (2739)    
Ponomariov (2739)      
Ponomariov (2739)    
Motylev (2695)    
  Motylev (2695)    
Najer (2695  
Ponomariov (2739)
Li Chao (2596)    
  Li Chao (2596)    
Pelletier (2589)      
Gashimov (2758)    
Gashimov (2758)        
  Gashimov (2758)        
Zhou Jianchao (2629      
Gashimov (2758)    
Caruana (2652)    
  Caruana (2652)    
Dominguez (2719)      
Caruana (2652)    
Alekseev (2715)    
  Alekseev (2715)    
Fressinet (2653)  
Khalifman (2612)  
  Tomashevsky (2708)  
Tomashevsky (2708)    
Shirov (2719)  
Shirov (2719)      
  Shirov (2719)      
Fedorchuk (2619)    
Svidler (2754)  
Nyback (2628)      
  Svidler (2754)      
Svidler (2754)        
Svidler (2754)      
Naiditsch (2689)      
  Naiditsch (2689)      
Onischuk (2672)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Zhou Weiqi (2603)  
  Kamsky (2695)  
Kamsky (2695)    
So (2640)  
Ivanchuk (2739)      
  So (2640)      
So (2640)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Inarkiev (2645)  
  Eljanov (2729)  
Eljanov (2729)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Malakhov (2706)  
  Malakhov (2706)  
Smirin (2662)



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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

VolleyD's picture

First game between Ponomariov and Gashimov is like "my Queen is my die".

Castro's picture

So unpredictable!
If Morozevich, Shirov, Svidler, Ivanchuk, or even Kamsky, Vachier or Polgar weren't eliminated already, we'd at least have some illusions of being "realist" on our favorite, maybe paradoxaly because they are brilliant but unpredictable.
Go Boris!

chess's picture

to bad. Karjakin-Gelfand should be the finales.

ChessGirl's picture

You say :)

Muadhib's picture

My "secret" favourite Gashimov is out.

I have feeling that the winner of Karjakin-Gelfand will defeat Ponomariov in the final. This of course can only mean one thing: Malakhov wins the Wotld Cup! :)

Muadhib's picture

World Cup, of course.

T. Goto's picture

As much as I miss guys who went home, I am amazed by the guys who are still standing. Gelfand-Karjakin would be a hard match; an old master vs a face of new generation (although he has been at the top level for quite a while). Ponomariov vs Malakhov would be hard fight and very unpredictable (ex. Champion of KO and a cool and unflinching engineer). Again, it is the matter of who will make the last decisive mistake. So far, for me, Malakhov's nice finish executed against Svidler is the most impressive one. Let's hunt for another beauty like that!

gg's picture

On a totally different subject this Bareev interview is interesting reading. He says that Nepomnyaschy would fit in Team Topalov, that Kasparov said that it's OK to take back moves, and that his moral code supported doing it. Bareev draws a parallel with Carlsen, who he describes as another take-back player, and says that he will always support the Russian players but never Carlsen. He thinks Karjakin can become top ten but hardly World Champion if Carlsen will stay in good health.

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout...

test's picture

@gg: Take into account that Bareev likes to talk with his tongue in his cheek. ;)
Don't take everything he says literally. The problem is of course that he does this so much that it becomes hard to figure out when he is being serious or not.

seyad hedayat salari's picture

very thanks for games.

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