Reports | August 29, 2011 16:49

World Cup R1.1: Leko loses to Shankland

In the biggest upset of the first day at the 2011 FIDE World Cup, Peter Leko of Hungary lost to American grandmaster Sam Shankland. Leko, a former World Championship contender, needs to win the second game with Black to stay in the competition.

General info

The 2011 FIDE World Cup is a 128-player knock-out taking place August 27-September 20 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Siberia. The tournament delivers three participants for the next Candidates tournament/matches, as part of the new World Championship cycle. Except for the final, all rounds have 2-game matches at the FIDE time control: 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to finish the game, with a 30-second increment from the first move. In case of a 1-1 tie, on the third day of the round a tie-break with four rapid games and if necessary blitz games and an Armageddon. More info here.

Round 1.1

The new World Cup is a day old and already it seems that this 4th edition in Khanty-Mansiysk is the best so far in terms of organization. The venue is stunning, as we mentioned in our previous report. On Sunday, when the first games were actually played, it became clear that the online chess fans are in for a treat as well. The Russian Chess Federation's superb coverage of their recent top tournaments is adopted in Khanty too, so apart from the games, the players themselves can be seen in high-quality video. On top of that, finally they have added English language commentary during the round. We can only join other websites who have already acclaimed the organizers for all this excellent stuff. However, having a bit of experience with video, we'll take the opportunity to provide some ideas to improve it even further. For example, there is no director who can switch to relevant camera positions. When the commentators talk about a game, with the small chess board in the down right corner, the video is not showing these players, but simply keeps switching between boards. What's very nice is that at the end of a game, sometimes a player joins the commentators to show the game, and in such cases the chess board should be made bigger. You can still watch the old videos here. World Cup R1.1 The biggest upset in the first round was Leko losing to Shankland. In a Semi-Slav, Anti-Meran the Hungarian kept a small advantage for a long time, but his opponent was just hanging on. Soon after the first time control all of White's advantage was gone, and Leko started to play inaccurately. Shankland's rook and knight were more active, and he could create a dangerous passed pawn. Perhaps Leko could have saved himself close to the end: Leko-Shankland Khanty-Mansiysk 2011 Leko loses to Shankland White lost after 63. Rb7+ Ke6 64. g5 Kf5 65. Rb5+ Kg6 66. Be1 b2 0-1, but we can't find a win for Black after 63. Be1! a) 63... Nxe3+ 64. Kf2 Nxg4+ (64... Nc2 65. Bc3 e3+ 66. Kf3) 65. Kg3 Ra1 66. Bc3 Rg1+ 67. Kf4; b) 63... Kd7 64. Bc3 Nxe3+ 65. Kg3 Kc6 66. Rb8 Nd1 67. Bg7 $1 b2+ 68. Kf4 e3 69. Kf3. The official website has Shankland commenting:

Of course I never expected to defeat with Black Peter Leko! I was hoping for a draw but everything could happen. That is why initially I prepared for my game with White a very sharp variation. Obviously I will reconsider my plans for Leko playing Black will surely do his utmost to make complications. After the opening Leko had got an advantage and his position was better during the whole game. When the game started to be presice we did not manage to avoid mutual blunders but I operated with tactical variations better. We faced the endgame with the position of a good Black Knight against a weak White Bishop. But even here I was ready for a draw until Leko started making several unlucky moves in a row. When my opponent offered a draw he had already a very bad position and I continued playing for I was not risking. Obviously I am very happy that could defeat Leko with Black.

Arguably the most spectacular game was Lima-Svidler. In a Grünfeld, the fresh Russian Champion got an impressive pawn majority on the queenside and started pushing, as Lima's king's attack was just a bit too slow. However, just before the time control Svidler blew it: Lima-Svidler Khanty-Mansiysk 2011 Lima-Svidler Here 36... Qe4 is the strongest, but more moves should be winning. Instead, after 36...b2?? 37. Qxa5 b1Q 38. Rxb1 Rxb1+ 39. Kf2 Black only had a draw: 39... Rb2+ 40. Kg3 Rxh2 41. Kxh2 Qf3 ½-½ We give all the games of the first day below. Please note that there are only 62 and not 64, because Parimarjan Negi (IND) and Alexander Ivanov (USA) went through to the second round without playing. As we reported earlier, their opponents Vladimir Akopian (ARM) and Wang Hao (CHN) had to cancel their participation.

Games round 1.1

 
 

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup 2011 | Round 1.1 Results
Name G1 G2 Tot   Name G1 G2 Tot
Round 1 Match 01         Round 1 Match 33      
Kaabi, Mejdi (TUN) 0   0   Corrales Jimenez, Fidel (CUB) 0   0
Karjakin, Sergey (RUS) 1   1   Polgar, Judit (HUN) 1   1
Round 1 Match 02         Round 1 Match 34      
Ivanchuk, Vassily (UKR) 1   1   Fressinet, Laurent (FRA) 1   1
Steel, Henry Robert (RSA) 0   0   Jumabayev, Rinat (KAZ) 0   0
Round 1 Match 03         Round 1 Match 35      
Ibrahim, Hatim (EGY) 0   0   Zherebukh, Yaroslav (UKR) ½   ½
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar (AZE) 1   1   Eljanov, Pavel (UKR) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 04         Round 1 Match 36      
Ponomariov, Ruslan (UKR) 1   1   Berkes, Ferenc (HUN) 1   1
Gwaze, Robert (ZIM) 0   0   Mareco, Sandro (ARG) 0   0
Round 1 Match 05         Round 1 Match 37      
Hansen, Eric (CAN) 0   0   Kazhgaleyev, Murtas (KAZ) ½   ½
Gashimov, Vugar (AZE) 1   1   Andreikin, Dmitry (RUS) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 06         Round 1 Match 38      
Grischuk, Alexander (RUS) 1   1   Morozevich, Alexander (RUS) ½   ½
Genba, Vladimir (RUS) 0   0   Halkias, Stelios (GRE) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 07         Round 1 Match 39      
De La Paz Perdomo, Frank (CUB) 0   0   Filippov, Anton (UZB) 1   1
Radjabov, Teimour (AZE) 1   1   Zhigalko, Sergei (BLR) 0   0
Round 1 Match 08         Round 1 Match 40      
Kamsky, Gata (USA) 1   1   Riazantsev, Alexander (RUS) 1   1
Di Berardino, Diego Rafae (BRA) 0   0   Bluvshtein, Mark (CAN) 0   0
Round 1 Match 09         Round 1 Match 41      
Lima, Darcy (BRA) ½   ½   Drozdovskij, Yuri (UKR) ½   ½
Svidler, Peter (RUS) ½   ½   Motylev, Alexander (RUS) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 10         Round 1 Match 42      
Jakovenko, Dmitry (RUS) 1   1   Wojtaszek, Radoslaw (POL) 1   1
Salem, A.R. Saleh (UAE) 0   0   Pashikian, Arman (ARM) 0   0
Round 1 Match 11         Round 1 Match 43      
Bezgodov, Alexei (RUS) ½   ½   Shulman, Yuri (USA) ½   ½
Vitiugov, Nikita (RUS) ½   ½   Potkin, Vladimir (RUS) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 12         Round 1 Match 44      
Almasi, Zoltan (HUN) 1   1   Nielsen, Peter Heine (DEN) ½   ½
El Gindy, Essam (EGY) 0   0   Postny, Evgeny (ISR) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 13         Round 1 Match 45      
Cori, Jorge (PER) 0   0   Romanov, Evgeny (RUS) ½   ½
Vallejo Pons, Francisco (ESP) 1   1   Grachev, Boris (RUS) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 14         Round 1 Match 46      
Navara, David (CZE) 1   1   Inarkiev, Ernesto (RUS) 1   1
Kabanov, Nikolai (RUS) 0   0   Salgado Lopez, Ivan (ESP) 0   0
Round 1 Match 15         Round 1 Match 47      
Rahman, Ziaur (BAN) ½   ½   Gupta, Abhijeet (IND) ½   ½
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime (FRA) ½   ½   Mamedov, Rauf (AZE) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 16         Round 1 Match 48      
Dominguez Perez, Leinier (CUB) 1   1   Kobalia, Mikhail (RUS) ½   ½
Moradiabadi, Elshan (IRI) 0   0   Lysyj, Igor (RUS) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 17         Round 1 Match 49      
Ivanov, Alexander (USA) 1   1   Socko, Bartosz (POL) 0   0
Wang, Hao (CHN) 0   0   Bologan, Viktor (MDA) 1   1
Round 1 Match 18         Round 1 Match 50      
Leko, Peter (HUN) 0   0   Bu, Xiangzhi (CHN) 1   1
Shankland, Samuel L (USA) 1   1   Adly, Ahmed (EGY) 0   0
Round 1 Match 19         Round 1 Match 51      
Esen, Baris (TUR) ½   ½   Ivanisevic, Ivan (SRB) ½   ½
Moiseenko, Alexander (UKR) ½   ½   Onischuk, Alexander (USA) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 20         Round 1 Match 52      
Le, Quang Liem (VIE) 1   1   Bruzon Batista, Lazaro (CUB) ½   ½
Megaranto, Susanto (INA) 0   0   Quesada Perez, Yuniesky (CUB) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 21         Round 1 Match 53      
Paragua, Mark (PHI) 0   0   Parligras, Mircea-Emilian (ROU) 1   1
Adams, Michael (ENG) 1   1   Yu, Yangyi (CHN) 0   0
Round 1 Match 22         Round 1 Match 54      
Shirov, Alexei (ESP) 1   1   Korobov, Anton (UKR) 1   1
Leon Hoyos, Manuel (MEX) 0   0   Zhou, Jianchao (CHN) 0   0
Round 1 Match 23         Round 1 Match 55      
Guliyev, Namig (AZE) 0   0   Rodshtein, Maxim (ISR) 0   0
Jobava, Baadur (GEO) 1   1   Harikrishna, P. (IND) 1   1
Round 1 Match 24         Round 1 Match 56      
Caruana, Fabiano (ITA) 1   1   Li, Chao b (CHN) ½   ½
Pridorozhni, Aleksei (RUS) 0   0   Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son (VIE) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 25         Round 1 Match 57      
Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynal (CUB) 0   0   Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter (ROU) 0   0
Nepomniachtchi, Ian (RUS) 1   1   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam (UZB) 1   1
Round 1 Match 26         Round 1 Match 58      
Bacrot, Etienne (FRA) ½   ½   Akopian, Vladimir (ARM) 0   0
Robson, Ray (USA) ½   ½   Negi, Parimarjan (IND) 1   1
Round 1 Match 27         Round 1 Match 59      
Fier, Alexandr (BRA) 1   1   Iordachescu, Viorel (MDA) 1   1
Wang, Yue (CHN) 0   0   Feller, Sebastien (FRA) 0   0
Round 1 Match 28         Round 1 Match 60      
Tomashevsky, Evgeny (RUS) 1   1   Timofeev, Artyom (RUS) ½   ½
Zhao, Zong-Yuan (AUS) 0   0   Azarov, Sergei (BLR) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 29         Round 1 Match 61      
Babula, Vlastimil (CZE) ½   ½   Khairullin, Ildar (RUS) ½   ½
Efimenko, Zahar (UKR) ½   ½   Ni, Hua (CHN) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 30         Round 1 Match 62      
Malakhov, Vladimir (RUS) ½   ½   Fridman, Daniel (GER) ½   ½
Felgaer, Ruben (ARG) ½   ½   Lupulescu, Constantin (ROU) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 31         Round 1 Match 63      
Vorobiov, Evgeny E. (RUS) ½   ½   Ragger, Markus (AUT) ½   ½
Sutovsky, Emil (ISR) ½   ½   Alekseev, Evgeny (RUS) ½   ½
Round 1 Match 32         Round 1 Match 64      
Movsesian, Sergei (ARM) 1   1   So, Wesley (PHI) ½   ½
Hou, Yifan (CHN) 0   0   Ding, Liren (CHN) ½   ½


Photos © Official website

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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

S3's picture

Have you ever asked your national federation about it? The general assembly (=representatives of all "FIDE countries") has to approve FIDE budgets and thus your federation probably has AR's or info on FIDE's income and spending.

But I guess the bulk of the money in this event is from Russian government and sponsors anyway. I doubt FIDE has enough money to facilitate this on it's own. All the more credit to them for finding these sponsors and partners.

Arne Moll's picture

Believe me, I've tried to find out about FIDE's finances, but I've not become much wise than the outdated and incomplete statements found on their website. It seems as untransparant as a neglected aquarium. I think it would take a lot of effort and patience to find out more, so I better leave it to proper journalists...

Arne Moll's picture

Are you sure there's no change in technology other than the language? To be sure, the main site sure looks much better and intuitively designed and the quality of the images and movies also looks much sharper.

As for the sponsors, it's all about oil, oil, oil. Which makes me think a lot of money was involved, and also makes me wonder whether such an event could ever be organized in a country that's not so heavily involved in that. Which makes Ilyumzhinov and his allies also more likely to stay in power for a while to come.

Call me a cynic, but what else can you be after 15 years of Kirsan?

Amos's picture

Well, the live feed from was good quality HD too too, so nothing much changing there. Although, I've noticed that commentators (at least Shipov) can now directly call upon the cameramen to show particular boards, thus essentialy directing the live show. Also, there might be more cameras in action here, as there are much more players than in any previous event covered like this.

It seems to me that the Russian Chess Federation has hit gold by finding a professional media company that can cover these events. They have gotten better and better over the time - something one would expect from dedicated professionals.

I don't think there is much to thank FIDE for here, except for "selling" the event to the Russian Chess Federation.

mishanp's picture

I think the HD/SD option appeared for the first time at the Russian Championship (might be wrong there), but I don't see anything else too different (maybe you're right that overall the website's slicker). The WhyChess system has replaced ChessOK to provide computer analysis (compared to the Olympiad, if I remember correctly).

To add to what I said about oil companies - just realised their are six (!) oil companies listed as sponsors on the homepage. Obviously you need to put up a fair amount of money as the prize fund's supposed to be $1.6 million and you've got all the other costs to add to that.

Szoker's picture

Crashed like 1 time for 5 seconds for me, so I dont even consider this a problem.

There are pictures.

Press conference ? at this stage of the tournament ? with 128 players ? ... (nvm, I'm watching Movsesian - Hou Yifan press conference RIGHT NOW)

Interviews will come up eventually, Im sure.

The HD live stream and english GM commentary are a great treat.

Im really enjoying it. (plus the great oldschool music in brakes between the commentary :P)

Szoker's picture

Crashed like 1 time for 5 seconds for me, so I dont even consider this a problem.

There are pictures.

Press conference ? at this stage of the tournament ? with 128 players ? ...

Interviews will come up eventually, Im sure.

The HD live stream and english GM commentary are a great treat.

Im really enjoying it. (plus the great oldschool music in brakes between the commentary :P)

Arne Moll's picture

The coverage and website look great indeed! Do we know how much it cost and who paid for it? Oh wait, the FIDE accounts for 2010 have yet to be published on their website...

Szoker's picture

Russians are always making great coverages of chess tournaments.

sporty's picture

not in this event though..... video ok, but live is crashing and that is essential. And news, interviews, press conference? hm.....

sporty's picture

Actually I wondered the same, the website was not updated for weeks, then at the start of the games it crashed..... It is a disaster coverage compared to the olympics, and much worse than it should be.
And let me guess, what international media went to the event? And how many will stay if Russians lose their games?

Sander's picture

Come on Arne, dont be so cynical.

I know FIDE in genral and Kirsan in particular are a bit off, but when they are actually doing something right why focus on the negative?

boki's picture

maybe when fide makes something good (like the coverage of the world cup) we should appriciate this. It is quite rare these days that there is something good from FIDE, unfortunatly.
But if it is good, it is simply good, so no need for sarcasm in my opinion

Peter Doggers's picture

Agree.

Arne Moll's picture

It's interesting to find out what was behind this huge change though, isn't it? Was it something structurally within the organization, were different people involved, with more expertise and know-how, or was it simply a matter of more money being outsourced to the right companies? It's relevant - for paying federation members if nothing else - to know whether it was planned and budgetted in advance or whether it was a case of sheer 'luck' that it worked this time. I don't see what's wrong with asking these questions. And yes, FIDE could be much more transparent in this. At the same time, we should praise their achievement. The two are not mutually exclusive IMHO.

mishanp's picture

But it's just using exactly the same system as the Candidates Matches (also a FIDE event), and the Russian Championship and the Tal Memorial, so I don't understand the sudden surprise at the coverage now. The difference is just that there's also English commentary, but that was a fairly obvious "innovation". There's an interview with the woman in charge of the TV coverage at the official site (only in Russian, I think): http://chess.ugrasport.com/?p=854&lang=ru They're also doing the Botvinnik Memorial with Carlsen, Anand, Aronian and Kramnik.

I'm not sure about the funding but Khanty-Mansiysk is an "oil-boom" town, so there's a lot of money there. (Incidentally, did you ever notice the main sponsor of the Russian Chess Federation is an arms manufacturer!? e.g. see the left of the board here: http://www.russiachess.org/online/2011/superw/ )

mishanp's picture

Actually the interview I mentioned is available in English as well (bear in mind e.g. "translation" = "broadcast"): http://chess.ugrasport.com/?p=881

S3's picture

You are a writer for chessvibes, maybe you could investigate it if you are really interested.

Arne Moll's picture

I've asked my national federation many questions regarding FIDE over the past years. As these things go, some were answered, others weren't. It's strange all this information isn't just available on the FIDE website, where it should be. Now, only someone who has a lot of time to investigate can perhaps find out something concrete.

S3's picture

I agree there should be information on the FIDE website. But I am surprised that your federation is not willing to share their info on FIDE financials. Did you specifically ask for a financial report? And do you know if they have any (of FIDE) ?

Aditya Kishore's picture

Can somene pls help me with analysis of Badur Jobaava Vs Guliyev Namig. To me its a lost for Badur if Guliyev playes Rg3 instead of Rg4(blunder) and 62 b2. Can black save the game?

Thomas's picture

I think the second-biggest upset is also worthwhile highlighting: Fier-Wang Yue 1-0. While the Brazilian had white, he wasn't at all "lucky" (as arguably Shankland and certainly Lima) but seemed to be in full control from start to finish. He managed what Topalov couldn't really do in his WCh matches against Kramnik and Anand, and what Grischuk recently (World Team Championship) didn't manage against the same Wang Yue: break down the "Slav wall" - this particular line is a bit reminiscent of the Berlin, early queen swap and black playing ugly moves as -Rg8.

German Chess Fan's picture

The official Website crashed in first round. Better follow the WhyChess Live Broadcast with a lot of features: http://worldcup2011.live.whychess.org/

jazzkoo's picture

what a great shot of shankland's eyes huh? a la tal...

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