Reports | August 30, 2011 0:39

World Cup R1.2: Leko and Wang Yue out

Peter Leko (Hungary) was eliminated by Sam Shankland (USA) at the World Cup in Kanty-Mansiysk on Monday, after their second game ended in a draw. Wang Yue (CHN) is also out after the first round; he lost 0.5-1.5 to Alexandr Fier (BRA). Anton Filippov won both games against the higher rated Sergei Zhigalko.


General info

The 2011 FIDE World Cup is a 128-player knock-out taking place August 27-September 20 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Siberia. The tournament delivers three participants for the next Candidates tournament/matches, as part of the new World Championship cycle. Except for the final, all rounds have 2-game matches at the FIDE time control: 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to finish the game, with a 30-second increment from the first move. In case of a 1-1 tie, on the third day of the round there's a tie-break with rapid games and if necessary blitz games and an Armageddon. More info here. Tournament bracket


Round 1.2

On the first day of the World Cup not 64 but 62 games were played, after Akopian and Wang Hao had to cancel shortly before the tournament. On Monday, the number of games was 61, because Ahmed Adly couldn't play. The Egyptian GM was hospitalized to the regional clinic due to sudden pains, which were caused by kidney stones. The official website reports that Adly is fine and can leave the hospital tomorrow. His opponent Bu Xiangzhi, who had won the first game, qualified for the second round. The biggest shock of this first round is the elimination of Peter Leko. After spoiling a close to winning advantage and then even losing his first game, on Monday the Hungarian didn't come close to an advantage (let alone winning chances) in his black game versus Sam Shankland. It was a surprising an excellent result for Shankland, who after the game said he had already booked a plane ticket for Wednesday. "This I have to change, and they will charge me a lot," the American said. Last year he was still a professional, but at the moment Shankland is a college student. "From the moment I went to college my results became huge!"

shankland

Sam Shankland eliminates Peter Leko

Leko, who recently returned to tournament chess after a rest period of nine months (here he explains why) , was a good sport: "My opponent was playing very strongly. I tried to do my best, I tried to experiment, but I failed." Another big upset was the knock-out of Chinese top GM Wang Yue by Alexandr Fier from Brazil. Like Shankland, already yesterday Fier beat his opponent and our regular commenter Thomas described it well:

He managed what Topalov couldn’t really do in his WCh matches against Kramnik and Anand, and what Grischuk recently (World Team Championship) didn’t manage against the same Wang Yue: break down the “Slav wall” – this particular line is a bit reminiscent of the Berlin, early queen swap and black playing ugly moves as -Rg8.

On day 2 Wang Yue got huge pressure, after sacrificing an exchange and getting two pawns back for it and what seemed like a killing bishop pair. However, Fier just defended and defended, until it was can easy draw. Gata Kamsky needs a tie-break to decide his match against Brazilian IM Diego Rafael Di Berardino. The U.S. Champion won his first game convincingly, but things went wrong in game 2: Di Berardino-Kamsky Khanty-Mansiysk 2011 Diagram Here 27... Bd5 should be equal. Instead, 27... Kh8?! was risky: 28. exd4! Bxf4 29. Qe2 Diagram Now Kamsky decided to defend the position a pawn down with 29... Bd5 but after 30. dxe5 Qe6 31. Rce1 Rac8 32. Bh4! White eventually won. After 29... Bxc1 White can choose between: a) 30. Rxc1 Qc6 31. d5 Rxd5 (31... Bxd5 32. Qxe5+) 32. Bxd5 Qxd5 33. Rc5 or b) 30. Qxe4!? Bh6 31. dxe5 with good compensation.

kamsky

Gata Kamsky: the highest rated player in the round 1 tie-breaks

The same happened to Paco Vallejo. First, the Spaniard easily beat Peruvian talent Jorge Cori with the black pieces, but then lost with White in the next game.

Vallejo

Vallejo needs a tie-break too

There was one more minimatch with this scenario (all other tied matches saw two draws): Iordachescu-Feller. The (in)famous French GM had to level the score on day 2, and managed: Feller-Iordachescu Khanty-Mansiysk 2011 Diagram45. Rxb7! Rxb7 46. Ba6 d4 (46... Rdd7 fails to 47. Qh8+) 47. Qb2 Kd7 48. Bxb7 dxe3 49. fxe3 Qc5 50. a6 Kc7 51. Kh1 Qxe3 52. Qa1 Rd2 53. a7 Rxg2 54. Qa5+ Kd7 Diagram 55. Bxc6+! Nxc6 56. Qd5+ Kc7 Diagram 57. a8N+! 1-0 Michael Adams had started with a smooth victory, playing Black against Philippine GM Mark Paragua. However, with the white pieces the English grandmaster got himself into trouble: Adams-Paragua Khanty-Mansiysk 2011 Diagram36... Rbb3 Paragua misses the killing 36... Bf6! a) 37. Qf2 Rxh3+ 38. Kg1 Bh4 39. Qf4 d3+ 40. Nd4 Rxd4; b) 37. Qe1 Rxh3+ 38. Kg1 d3+ 39. Qf2 Rh1+; c) 37. Qh6 Bg5!! (it's all about the Rxh3 trick) 38. Qxg5 Rxh3+ 39. Kg1 d3+ 40. Nd4 Rxd4. 37. Ng1 Rxb5 38. Nc3 Rxb2 39. Rxb2 Qxb2 40. Qd8+ Kh7 41. Nd5 Diagram41... Qf2 41... Bxd5 42. Qxd5 Rg3 was still relatively easy to win. 42. Nxe3 dxe3 43. Qg5! e2 44. Nxe2 Qxe2 45. Qh4+ Qh5 46. Qxh5+ gxh5 47. Rd6 Diagram and Adams managed to hold this and qualify for the next round.

Games round 1.2

 
 

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup 2011 | Round 1 Results
Name G1 G2 Tot   Name G1 G2 Tot
Round 1 Match 01         Round 1 Match 33      
Kaabi, Mejdi (TUN) 0 0 0   Corrales Jimenez, Fidel (CUB) 0 0 0
Karjakin, Sergey (RUS) 1 1 2   Polgar, Judit (HUN) 1 1 2
Round 1 Match 02         Round 1 Match 34      
Ivanchuk, Vassily (UKR) 1 1 2   Fressinet, Laurent (FRA) 1 1 2
Steel, Henry Robert (RSA) 0 0 0   Jumabayev, Rinat (KAZ) 0 0 0
Round 1 Match 03         Round 1 Match 35      
Ibrahim, Hatim (EGY) 0 0 0   Zherebukh, Yaroslav (UKR) ½ ½ 1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar (AZE) 1 1 2   Eljanov, Pavel (UKR) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 04         Round 1 Match 36      
Ponomariov, Ruslan (UKR) 1 ½   Berkes, Ferenc (HUN) 1 ½
Gwaze, Robert (ZIM) 0 ½ ½   Mareco, Sandro (ARG) 0 ½ ½
Round 1 Match 05         Round 1 Match 37      
Hansen, Eric (CAN) 0 0 0   Kazhgaleyev, Murtas (KAZ) ½ 0 ½
Gashimov, Vugar (AZE) 1 1 2   Andreikin, Dmitry (RUS) ½ 1
Round 1 Match 06         Round 1 Match 38      
Grischuk, Alexander (RUS) 1 ½   Morozevich, Alexander (RUS) ½ ½ 1
Genba, Vladimir (RUS) 0 ½ ½   Halkias, Stelios (GRE) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 07         Round 1 Match 39      
De La Paz Perdomo, Frank (CUB) 0 0 0   Filippov, Anton (UZB) 1 1 2
Radjabov, Teimour (AZE) 1 1 2   Zhigalko, Sergei (BLR) 0 0 0
Round 1 Match 08         Round 1 Match 40      
Kamsky, Gata (USA) 1 0 1   Riazantsev, Alexander (RUS) 1 ½
Di Berardino, Diego Rafae (BRA) 0 1 1   Bluvshtein, Mark (CAN) 0 ½ ½
Round 1 Match 09         Round 1 Match 41      
Lima, Darcy (BRA) ½ 0 ½   Drozdovskij, Yuri (UKR) ½ ½ 1
Svidler, Peter (RUS) ½ 1   Motylev, Alexander (RUS) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 10         Round 1 Match 42      
Jakovenko, Dmitry (RUS) 1 1 2   Wojtaszek, Radoslaw (POL) 1 1 2
Salem, A.R. Saleh (UAE) 0 0 0   Pashikian, Arman (ARM) 0 0 0
Round 1 Match 11         Round 1 Match 43      
Bezgodov, Alexei (RUS) ½ ½ 1   Shulman, Yuri (USA) ½ ½ 1
Vitiugov, Nikita (RUS) ½ ½ 1   Potkin, Vladimir (RUS) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 12         Round 1 Match 44      
Almasi, Zoltan (HUN) 1 1 2   Nielsen, Peter Heine (DEN) ½ ½ 1
El Gindy, Essam (EGY) 0 0 0   Postny, Evgeny (ISR) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 13         Round 1 Match 45      
Cori, Jorge (PER) 0 1 1   Romanov, Evgeny (RUS) ½ 0 ½
Vallejo Pons, Francisco (ESP) 1 0 1   Grachev, Boris (RUS) ½ 1
Round 1 Match 14         Round 1 Match 46      
Navara, David (CZE) 1 1 2   Inarkiev, Ernesto (RUS) 1 ½
Kabanov, Nikolai (RUS) 0 0 0   Salgado Lopez, Ivan (ESP) 0 ½ ½
Round 1 Match 15         Round 1 Match 47      
Rahman, Ziaur (BAN) ½ 0 ½   Gupta, Abhijeet (IND) ½ 1
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime (FRA) ½ 1   Mamedov, Rauf (AZE) ½ 0 ½
Round 1 Match 16         Round 1 Match 48      
Dominguez Perez, Leinier (CUB) 1 ½   Kobalia, Mikhail (RUS) ½ ½ 1
Moradiabadi, Elshan (IRI) 0 ½ ½   Lysyj, Igor (RUS) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 17         Round 1 Match 49      
Ivanov, Alexander (USA) 1 1 2   Socko, Bartosz (POL) 0 ½ ½
Wang, Hao (CHN) 0 0 0   Bologan, Viktor (MDA) 1 ½
Round 1 Match 18         Round 1 Match 50      
Leko, Peter (HUN) 0 ½ ½   Bu, Xiangzhi (CHN) 1 1 2
Shankland, Samuel L (USA) 1 ½   Adly, Ahmed (EGY) 0 0 0
Round 1 Match 19         Round 1 Match 51      
Esen, Baris (TUR) ½ 0 ½   Ivanisevic, Ivan (SRB) ½ 0 ½
Moiseenko, Alexander (UKR) ½ 1   Onischuk, Alexander (USA) ½ 1
Round 1 Match 20         Round 1 Match 52      
Le, Quang Liem (VIE) 1 ½   Bruzon Batista, Lazaro (CUB) ½ ½ 1
Megaranto, Susanto (INA) 0 ½ ½   Quesada Perez, Yuniesky (CUB) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 21         Round 1 Match 53      
Paragua, Mark (PHI) 0 ½ ½   Parligras, Mircea-Emilian (ROU) 1 1 2
Adams, Michael (ENG) 1 ½   Yu, Yangyi (CHN) 0 0 0
Round 1 Match 22         Round 1 Match 54      
Shirov, Alexei (ESP) 1 ½   Korobov, Anton (UKR) 1 1 2
Leon Hoyos, Manuel (MEX) 0 ½ ½   Zhou, Jianchao (CHN) 0 0 0
Round 1 Match 23         Round 1 Match 55      
Guliyev, Namig (AZE) 0 0 0   Rodshtein, Maxim (ISR) 0 ½ ½
Jobava, Baadur (GEO) 1 1 2   Harikrishna, P. (IND) 1 ½
Round 1 Match 24         Round 1 Match 56      
Caruana, Fabiano (ITA) 1 ½   Li, Chao b (CHN) ½ 0 ½
Pridorozhni, Aleksei (RUS) 0 ½ ½   Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son (VIE) ½ 1
Round 1 Match 25         Round 1 Match 57      
Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynal (CUB) 0 0 0   Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter (ROU) 0 ½ ½
Nepomniachtchi, Ian (RUS) 1 1 2   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam (UZB) 1 ½
Round 1 Match 26         Round 1 Match 58      
Bacrot, Etienne (FRA) ½ ½ 1   Akopian, Vladimir (ARM) 0 0 0
Robson, Ray (USA) ½ ½ 1   Negi, Parimarjan (IND) 1 1 2
Round 1 Match 27         Round 1 Match 59      
Fier, Alexandr (BRA) 1 ½   Iordachescu, Viorel (MDA) 1 0 1
Wang, Yue (CHN) 0 ½ ½   Feller, Sebastien (FRA) 0 1 1
Round 1 Match 28         Round 1 Match 60      
Tomashevsky, Evgeny (RUS) 1 1 2   Timofeev, Artyom (RUS) ½ 0 ½
Zhao, Zong-Yuan (AUS) 0 0 0   Azarov, Sergei (BLR) ½ 1
Round 1 Match 29         Round 1 Match 61      
Babula, Vlastimil (CZE) ½ 0 ½   Khairullin, Ildar (RUS) ½ ½ 1
Efimenko, Zahar (UKR) ½ 1   Ni, Hua (CHN) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 30         Round 1 Match 62      
Malakhov, Vladimir (RUS) ½ ½ 1   Fridman, Daniel (GER) ½ 1
Felgaer, Ruben (ARG) ½ ½ 1   Lupulescu, Constantin (ROU) ½ 0 ½
Round 1 Match 31         Round 1 Match 63      
Vorobiov, Evgeny E. (RUS) ½ ½ 1   Ragger, Markus (AUT) ½ ½ 1
Sutovsky, Emil (ISR) ½ ½ 1   Alekseev, Evgeny (RUS) ½ ½ 1
Round 1 Match 32         Round 1 Match 64      
Movsesian, Sergei (ARM) 1 1 2   So, Wesley (PHI) ½ ½ 1
Hou, Yifan (CHN) 0 0 0   Ding, Liren (CHN) ½ ½ 1


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Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

blade's picture

And one goes into second round, Bu Xiangzhi.

Remco G's picture

If there are any better contenders, they should have played.

john's picture

Taking three people from this very poor knock-out format tournament into the Candidates Cycle seems like a lot to me. I think only the winner should go forward, if that.

Harish Srinivasan's picture

There are 128 people playing and its better to have at least 3 go through to a cycle to allow for some one move concentration lap after somebody reaches the very top. Only that would be a pity.

john's picture

It is an interesting tournament in its own right I agree, but why pretend it has anything to do with finding the strongest player in the world? It clearly doesn't.

gg's picture

The usual response to that is that in matches the strongest player always wins regardless if the number of games is two, four or more. But I can understand why top players like Nakamura and Kramnik aren't interested in playing this type of events. At least it seems as if FIDE changed the system from having this knockout as qualification for a four game knockout Candidates as was originally planned. A double round robin as Candidates will make much more sense.

Thomas's picture

The tournament is what it is: one way (3 out of 8 spots) to qualify for the candidates event. Those, in total, eight players determine who gets the right to challenge the world champion, and whoever wins that match might be the strongest player in the world [some people might argue that this honor goes to the highest-rated player, regardless of how he performs in the candidates event and if he even participates].

Hence, the World Cup winner(s) are still about 20 classical games away from the world champion title. BTW I agree with your first post: three players from the World Cup is a lot, personally I would have preferred a follow-up to the FIDE Grand Prix (but I don't have the money to sponsor even one of these tournaments :) )

Lobster's picture

Well said, and very true.

Aingle Pack's picture

5 chinese eliminated. 2 go into tie-breaks.

RealityCheck's picture

A sad day for chinese chess players indeed.

Hoang Sa Truong Sa are Vietnamese's picture

And a great day for Viet Nam. We have only two players, who both qualified and one has elliminated a Chinese.

Hoang Sa Truong Sa are Vietnamese!!! Every Vietnamese agree with me!!!

Ben's picture

USA went an impressive (for our standards) 3-0-3 so far.

Rambus's picture

Hou Yifan showed her inexperience against Movsesian when she had him on the ropes, although Movsesian is rated more than 100 points higher. However, I think she also showed that poor Koneru hasn't an earthly chance in the World Championship.

TMM's picture

Unfortunately no Polgar vs. Hou in round two.

Zeblakob's picture

yes :( and Movesian playing women so far.

bondegnasker's picture

So if Movsesian beats Polgar, he's the strongest woman in the world?

TMM's picture

Today Polgar beat Movsesian to win 1.5-0.5, so she remains the strongest woman in the world for now.

Szoker's picture

Shankland !

I'm Impressed ;)

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