Reports | December 04, 2009 3:26

World Cup R5: Karjakin & Malakhov start with wins

Sergei Karjakin and Vladimir Malakhov have excellent chances to reach the semi-finals of the World Cup. On the first day of round 5, Karjakin beat Mamedyarov with White in an Open Ruy Lopez while Malakhov beat Svidler with Black in a Chebanenko Slav. Both Gelfand-Jakovenko, and Ponomariov-Gashimov ended in a draw.

The FIDE World Chess Cup takes place November 20th-December 15th inn Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It's a seven-round knockout with six rounds of matches comprising two games per round. The final seventh round consists of four games.

Round 1 (November 21-23): 128 players Round 5 (December 3-5): 8 players
Round 2 (November 24-26): 64 players Round 6 (December 6-8): 4 players
Round 3 (November 27-29): 32 players Round 7 (December 10-14): 2 players
Round 4 (November 30-December 2): 16 players


The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move from move one. Games start at 15:00h local time (11:00 CET).

Results round 5, day 1

World Cup 2009 | Results round 5

Round 5, day 1

Only four boards, and eight players are left in Khanty-Mansiysk. By the way, the round 4 losers went home with US $ 20,000 each (tax already deducted), while the players still in the field will be dividing a total (net) sum of $ 352,000. (This round's losers will earn US $ 28,000, the losers of the semis US $ 40,000, the runner-up US $ 64,000 and the winner US $ 96,000).

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov started with wins in all first four rounds, but today he lost game 1 against his first higher-rated opponent, Sergey Karjakin. Shakh's opening choice was a surprising one, since according to the database he played the Open Ruy Lopez only 11 games before, the last time in December 2004. Besides, Karjakin's preparation looked much better too.

15...0-0 was a deviation from a previous Karjakin game, but already with 18.g4! White had a clear advantage. Black just held on in the endgame, but White was always clearly on top. It seems that the last phase of the rook ending contains a few mutual mistakes:


49.f3! is winning on the spot here because of Zugzwang. After 49.Rf5 the move 49...g4 was absolutely necessary, but 49...Rb2? allowed the pretty 50.f4! and the pawn always queens.

In this group of eight, Vladimir Malakhov is a relatively unknown grandmaster since he's never played in a super-tournament, but as we mentioned before, the Russian has been a 2600-high GM for a long time (and now even 2700+). More concretely we're talking about the FIDE rating list of April 2002, when Malakhov passed the 2650 border and never went below!

This little intro makes it less of a surprise that Malakhov beat Svidler today, and we might add in an excellent game. Svidler went for 1.d4, despite the fact that his opponent's Chebanenko Slav has been looking very solid in this World Cup. After the opening the game got more and more interesting with every move, with Svidler sacrificing material for an attack, and Malakhov just taking everything because he had seen something very nice at the end of a long variation.


The move 27...g5! was necessary here but after 28.Qh5 d2 29.f6 Qxf6! 30.Bxd4 Qxd4+ 31.Kg2 it looks like White is winning...


...except for Malakhov's final move: 31...dxe1N+! and Svidler resigned.

Gelfand was probably caught in preparation by Jakovenko and got nothing out of the opening. In a long and tiresome event like this it's not a bad idea to take an early draw, even with White. And that's what Gelfand did.

Ponomariov-Gashimov was a fascinating battle. The Sicilian Dragon has been theoretically under a cloud for years against 1.e4, and in this respect its counterpart against 1.d4 is the Benoni. However, the new top 10 player Vugar Gashimov has been using it successfully for quite a while now.

Perhaps the opening needs such a strong player to be playable, because also in this game White got the upper hand. However, it looks like Ponomariov missed a few chances and therefore Gashmov's Benoni draw was a narrow escape today.


29.f3! would have won because 29...Rxd5 can be answered by 30.Nb4! Rc5 31.N2d3. In the game 29.Nd3 Qf7 was played, where 30. g5! Nxg5 31.Na7! Rb8 32.Nxc8 Rbxc8 33.Rxc8 Rxc8 34.f4 would have trapped the knight.

All photos by Galina Popova | courtesy of FIDE

Games round 5, day 1

Game viewer by ChessTempo

FIDE World Cup - Pairings & results rounds 2-7

Round 2
Round 3
Round 4
Round 5
Round 6
Round 7
 
Shabalov (2606)
  Navara (2707)
Navara (2707)  
Karjakin (2723)
Karjakin (2723)    
  Karjakin (2723)    
Timofeev (2651)  
Karjakin (2723)
Sakaev (2626)    
  Sakaev (2626)    
Radjabov (2748)      
Vitiugov (2694)    
Vitiugov (2694)    
  Vitiugov (2694)    
Milos (2603)  
Cheparinov (2671)    
  Bologan (2692)    
Bologan (2692)      
Laznicka (2637)    
Morozevich (2750)        
  Laznicka (2637)        
Laznicka (2637)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Milov (2652)    
  Mamedyarov (2719)    
Mamedyarov (2719)      
Mamedyarov (2719)    
Wang Hao (2708)    
  Wang Hao (2708)    
Ganguly (2654)  
Meier (2653)  
  Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)    
Vachier-Lagrave (2718)  
Yu Yangyi (2527)      
  Yu Yangyi (2527)      
Bartel (2618)    
Gelfand (2758)  
Amonatov (2631)      
  Gelfand (2758)      
Gelfand (2758)        
Gelfand (2758)      
Polgar (2680)      
  Polgar (2680)      
Nisipeanu (2677)    
 
Iturrizaga (2605)  
  Jobava (2696)  
Jobava (2696)    
Grischuk (2736)  
Grischuk (2736)      
  Grischuk (2736)      
Tkachiev (2642)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Sandipan (2623)  
  Jakovenko (2736)  
Jakovenko (2736)    
Jakovenko (2736)  
Rublevsky (2697)  
  Areshchenko (2664)  
Areshchenko (2664)
 
Sasikiran (2664)
  Bacrot (2700)
Bacrot (2700)  
Bacrot (2700)
Wang Yue (2734)    
  Wang Yue (2734)    
Savchenko (2644)  
Ponomariov (2739)
Akobian (2624)    
  Ponomariov (2739)    
Ponomariov (2739)      
Ponomariov (2739)    
Motylev (2695)    
  Motylev (2695)    
Najer (2695  
Li Chao (2596)    
  Li Chao (2596)    
Pelletier (2589)      
Gashimov (2758)    
Gashimov (2758)        
  Gashimov (2758)        
Zhou Jianchao (2629      
Gashimov (2758)    
Caruana (2652)    
  Caruana (2652)    
Dominguez (2719)      
Caruana (2652)    
Alekseev (2715)    
  Alekseev (2715)    
Fressinet (2653)  
Khalifman (2612)  
  Tomashevsky (2708)  
Tomashevsky (2708)    
Shirov (2719)  
Shirov (2719)      
  Shirov (2719)      
Fedorchuk (2619)    
Svidler (2754)  
Nyback (2628)      
  Svidler (2754)      
Svidler (2754)        
Svidler (2754)      
Naiditsch (2689)      
  Naiditsch (2689)      
Onischuk (2672)    
 
Zhou Weiqi (2603)  
  Kamsky (2695)  
Kamsky (2695)    
So (2640)  
Ivanchuk (2739)      
  So (2640)      
So (2640)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Inarkiev (2645)  
  Eljanov (2729)  
Eljanov (2729)    
Malakhov (2706)  
Malakhov (2706)  
  Malakhov (2706)  
Smirin (2662)



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Peter Doggers's picture
Author: Peter Doggers

Founder and editor-in-chief of ChessVibes.com, Peter is responsible for most of the chess news and tournament reports. Often visiting top events, he also provides photos and videos for the site. He's a 1.e4 player himself, likes Thai food and the Stones.

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Comments

GuidedByVoices's picture

No actual Western players left... I think Gelfand chess upbringing was not precisely in Israel... So the chinese players need to keep the pressure up and also quit smoking to catch up with these Vodka-drinkers... Look up for Malakhov, he might well follow the steps of Khalifman and Kazim in this format...

chess's picture

jakovenko made a new move 10...Bf6, cant find this move at my twic database and else. not so bad. so chess is still open for new opening moves and suprises.
where does the name svidler come from? i dont think it is a typical russian name. or is it?

marpada's picture

Some top players are able to serve equally well with either 1.e4 or 1.d4 , but Svidler is not one of then and his strength is reduced dramatically when he is out of his loved 1.e4.

Arne Moll's picture

Very nice to see a picture of a smiling Malakhov, I hadn't seen one before.

T. Goto's picture

I remember Malakhov from the candidate matches for Maxico. He lost to Grischuk at that time, but he was also tied first for an event I cannot remember the name recently (sorry, I am working on my final papers.) His game was in the book on Accelerated Dragon from Everyman (by Greet). I always thought he was a professional GM, but someone from here wrote that he is a nuclear engineer. Then, it is even more impressive that he achieved as high as he is now.

leigh's picture

The below sentence by GuidedByVoices made me laugh :

"the chinese players need to keep the pressure up and also quit smoking to catch up with these Vodka-drinkers"

Humour!

silvakov's picture

I think Malakhov's first claim to fame should be his 2700 ELO at the april 2004 list, when he was as high as number 17 in the world and as young as 24. Now, despite his 2707 ELO, with a 2715 peak in last list, he's "only" around number 25, 30. And, of course, the fact of being one of the strongest "full-time amateur" of all times (he always was nuclear engeneer, while most of the current poker-chess professionals were initially full time chess players)

unknown's picture

Great news! Mamedyarov crushed himself on Karjakin's rock!

Nakamura fan's picture

Sergei Karjakin and Vladimir Malakhov are in the semi-finals.

Oak's picture

Wasn't Malakhov completely winning?

Thomas's picture

Malakhov was probably better in the final position, I don't think completely winning - but Svidler had his reasons to offer a draw, and Malakhov had no compelling reason to decline .... .

@silvakov: I think 24 is already rather old in the current chess world ... . About world-top amateurs, arguably the strongest one (in my chessic lifetime) was Robert Huebner, nicknamed "Doc" for a reason: he always kept working as a papyrologist, which didn't keep him from getting quite far in several WCh cycles.

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