Archive for Reviews

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Review: Advanced Chess Tactics
(3)
Monday, May 21, 2012 13:52
Self-improvement is nowadays mainly focused on learning new openings with the aid of databases. Young people especially tend to neglect studying other parts of our royal game, which might result in fundamental shortcomings. Lev Psakhis insists that a mastery of tactics is an invaluable strength for a competitive chess player. Psakhis is a well-...
GM Stuart Conquest on Averbakh's Centre-Stage and Behind the Scenes (Part 2)
(8)
Tuesday, May 01, 2012 23:12
I seldom review chess books. To review a chess book one has to read it - at least, I always do - and this immediately presents a problem, for what if the book is no good? In that case one's time is doubly wasted, for not only has one read a worthless book, but afterwards one is obliged to write about it. In such unhappy circumstances there is no...
Stuart Conquest on Averbakh's Centre-Stage and Behind the Scenes (Part 1 of 2)
Thursday, April 26, 2012 17:41
I seldom review chess books. To review a chess book one has to read it - at least, I always do - and this immediately presents a problem, for what if the book is no good? In that case one's time is doubly wasted, for not only has one read a worthless book, but afterwards one is obliged to write about it. In such unhappy circumstances there is no...
Review: The Alterman Gambit Guide - Black Gambits 1
(0)
Tuesday, April 10, 2012 11:26
Frankly speaking, I’ve never been fond of opening books where the author proposes dubious gambits to his readers. Nowadays the growing strength of the engines enables people to refute the recommended lines at a single touch. However, after reading the first couple of pages of The Alterman Gambit Guide Black Gambits 1 I sensed I’d have to adjust my...
Review: Kaufman and his Komodo
Wednesday, March 28, 2012 8:43
Nowadays opening books play a different role than before the database era. There is no longer a need for a complete survey of all possibilities. Instead, opening books may have different focuses, supporting or even avoiding the database knowledge. Quite familiar is an opening book written by an expert of high level, which supplies valuable...
Review: The Tarrasch Defence
Sunday, February 19, 2012 1:29
The Tarrasch Defence is a great opening. It is both solid and active, it has a rich history and it has been endorsed by numerous world class players, including Garry Kasparov. Dr. Siegbert Tarrasch himself gave the good example when he wrote, more than a hundred years ago, of ‘his’ 3…c5: “All along I instinctively recognized this move as the right...
Review: The Ragozin Complex
Friday, February 03, 2012 16:28
As a life-long King's Indian player (not counting the occasional flirt with the Grünfeld), I've never been very enthusiastic about answering the move 1.d4 with putting my pawns on d5 and e6. In Queen's Gambits White always has a small but very annoying edge, the Nimzo & Queen's Indian complex somehow doesn't seem to suit my style and without...
Review: Garry Kasparov on Garry Kasparov Part 1: 1973-1985
Friday, December 16, 2011 22:05
Hikaru Nakamura was recently interviewed by Daniel King about his cooperation with Kasparov (which, as we now know, is already over). To my surprise, the American super grandmaster repeated the old, long refuted cliché that Kasparov’s main strength was in openings. Nakamura: I mean you look at middlegames or endgames and I’m quite convinced there...
Dutch Special: Paul van der Sterren's memoirs
Thursday, November 10, 2011 17:20
Our most faithful readers know that (very) occasionally we pay attention to a chess publication in the Dutch (our native) language, when we feel we cannot leave it unmentioned. This is one of those moments: the publication of Dutch GM Paul van der Sterren's memoires. A must-read for Dutch chess fans, and therefore reviewed in Dutch. Zo'n twee...
Review: Yearbook 100
Wednesday, October 19, 2011 15:51
From the start of this website back in 2006 there has been no clear rule about which content would (should?) be published, except for: what kind of chess article would I, the editor-in-chief, find interesting to read? Five and a half years later I still try to follow this guideline, and it made me decide to do this review. Some of you might be...

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