Archive for Reviews

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Sunday, September 06, 2009 2:53
As a fairly decent club player, I have always been impressed with club members, whether higher or lower rated than me, who were able to quickly evaluate basic endgames as 'elementary' draws or wins. I must admit I have always had difficulties remembering and truly understanding even the most basic endgames. That's why I was happy to read two...
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Wednesday, August 26, 2009 16:47
It's easy to become spoiled. In my review of Kasparov's book on his first two matches against Karpov (1984-1985), I expressed the hope that his next books would be as great as the first. But now that Kasparov has written about his 1986-1987 matches, I find myself so used to the level of his books that it seems quite tedious to praise his new book...
Thursday, August 06, 2009 20:34
Opening books and even more opening books: does it ever stop? Not likely, looking at the pile of opening books that have come out recently. In this review, I will look at a small selection of the sample from four different major publishers. But first I'd like to pose a question I have wondered about for as long as I can remember. Suppose you...
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Thursday, July 23, 2009 23:15
The quarterly Matten provides a mixture of interviews, stories and anecdotes with a literary flavour, interweaved with drawings, cartoons and photos. Recently the 6th issue came out, and as a rare exception we bring a review in the Dutch language. Sinds de opheffing van Schaaknieuws en de Engelstalige successen van Nederlandse schaakschrijvers...
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Monday, July 13, 2009 19:46
Prejudice is the root of all evil. It took me over five years before I finally picked up Mark Haddon's prize-winning novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, just because I thought the title was terribly pretentious. Once I had read one paragraph, I couldn't stop until I had finished it a few hours later. Chess books, too, are...
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Sunday, July 05, 2009 18:30
In my previous review, I praised Bobby Fischer's compact use of language. This time, I want to show that good chess writing doesn't have to be compact - the book I'm reviewing today is everything but compact, but it's also very good. IM Herman Grooten, a well-known Dutch chess trainer and author of chess books, has finally collected his training...
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Tuesday, June 30, 2009 21:50
Peter told me last week he had been to a concert called The Beatles vs. The Stones. Tastes differ, but still ... as a Beatles fan I can't help feeling tempted to start a discussion with Stones fans sometimes, just for fun. Do they really think Sticky Fingers is better than Sgt. Pepper? I guess making comparisons like these is only human. In this...
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Sunday, June 14, 2009 22:11
Ivan Sokolov's Winning Chess Middlegames - an Essential Guide to Pawn Structures has already received so much positive feedback from reviewers that it seems difficult to say something different about the book. I had very high expectations of this recent New in Chess top selling book, but after such extraordinary praise, I must admit I was slightly...
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Monday, May 25, 2009 22:14
Igor Stohl's Instructive Modern Chess Masterpieces is written in the tradition of classic chess books such as Tarrasch's Dreihundert Schachpartien and Nimzowitsch's Die Praxis Meines Systems: serious game analysis put in a broader context of chess developments over time. The new enlarged edition, published by Gambit, contains over 100 pages of...
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Wednesday, May 13, 2009 0:03
I wouldn't have expected a book on a few World Championship matches of more than 50 years ago to reach the no. 1 spot in the New in Chess bestseller's list, but that's what happened last month. Then I discovered it contains a lot more than that. Botvinnik-Smyslov, Three World Chess Championship Matches, is a compilation of Mikhail Botvinnik's...

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