Archive for Opening

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Thursday, July 01, 2010 23:31
During my holidays I received a lot of chess books from various publishers. There's lot to look forward to! One of the most interesting books is the latest volume of John Watson's ambitious project to explain and analyse all chess openings. But the book became much more than just another opening manual. Two years ago, I wrote a generally positive...
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Tuesday, May 05, 2009 14:33
It doesn't happen often that a chess author makes me laugh, but Ilya Odessky is one of them. But that's not all. Many reviews of his new book Play 1.b3!, published by New in Chess, are also extremely funny. The point is, most reviewers assume Odessky wrote an opening book, which only reveals they haven't even read the book. This book is not about...
Friday, May 01, 2009 21:07
In two recent reports on the Grand Prix in Nalchik, my colleague-editor Michael Schwerteck wrote about how he hates the Petroff Defence - especially the way it's played by all these super grandmasters. All these boring draws - blegh. And Michael's clearly not the only one. Let's consider what can be so hateful about the Petroff in the first...
Thursday, April 23, 2009 3:49
Everybody has a favourite chess move. Many just love 23...Qg3. Tim Krabb?©'s favourite is 16...Nc6. According to British Chess Magazine, it's 47...Bh3. And a member of my local chess club is obsessed by the move 7.Ke3! in the Traxler Counter-Attack. These are all highly spectacular moves. My own favourite is the¬†very modest queen-shuffle 2.Qe2. I...
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Sunday, February 08, 2009 1:00
John Watson is one of the best chess authors around. Currently, he's writing a series of high-quality opening books, focussing (as always) on understanding and framing the opening in its proper context. I will take a look at the latest volume in his 'Mastering the Chess Openings' series, published by Gambit Books, which is about the English...
Wednesday, February 04, 2009 5:23
All successful chess players are alike; every unsuccesful chess player is unsuccessful in his own way. I was eight years old and I was excited as any eight-year-old can be. My excitement was caused not by chess, but by the arrival of a book I had ordered, titled How to be a Spy. It was full of thrilling tips which could be used by our 'group' in...