Weekly endgame study | November 16, 2009 1:28

Weekly Endgame Study (144)

Weekly Endgame StudyEvery week we present you an endgame study selected by IM Yochanan Afek: player, trainer, endgame study composer and writer. A week later the solution is published. Good luck solving!


A. Manveljan
2001

White to play and draw

Next week the solution.

Update 21:12: It seems that this is the first endgame study ever published at ChessVibes that's busted by the tablebase! 1.b6+ Kd1! 2.b7 Kc2 wins for Black. But since the (flawed) solution of the study is quite pretty, this week's task is: how to draw with White if Black answers 1.b6 with 1...Ke3.


Solution last week

Y. Afek
2000

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Yochanan Afek's picture
Author: Yochanan Afek

IM Yochanan Afek is a chess player, trainer, endgame study composer and writer. His complete selection of studies can be found here.

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Comments

Jochem's picture

> Finally, the draw after 1…Ke3 2.b7 Be6 3.Bc4 is very trivial!

It's not too difficult, but I wouldn't call it trivial after 3...Rd2+ (took me some time)

Titus's picture

The only thing tablebases have to do with it is that it is a 6 piece ending. Hence, it has been solved exactly and its solution is freely available e.g at
http://www.shredderchess.com/online-chess/online-databases/endgame-datab...
. I assume this composition was created before tablebases existed or it was composed by someone that thinks using tablebases in unethical for designing and solving endgame studies ;-)

Arne Moll's picture

I must admit I don't understand anything of this study, not even its refutation.

When I first saw it, it immediately reminded me of the famous Saavedra position, I guess with the position of the kings and the black rook and the white pawn trying to promote are rather similar.
So basically the very first line I looked at was 1.b6+ Kd1 (or Kd2) 2.b7 Kc2 and Black mates just like in the Saavedra position! How is it possible that the composer missed this, and how is this a 'tablebase' refutation?
Actually only 1...Kd1 wins because after the better try 2.Kb3 Bb6 3.Kc4 Black has 3...Rd2!! winning because the rook can get behind the pawn in the line 4.Kc5 Bg2 5.b7 Rb2. The only reason to play 1...Ke3 (which was apparently part of the solution) is that 2.Kb3 again doesn't work because the rook can get behind the b-pawn after 2...Bc6 3.Kc3 Rd2.
But here's the strange thing: if the author has seen this motif (as he must have after 1...Ke3), why hasn't he looked at 2...Kd1 (making Rd2 possible as well) which also threatens the simple mate with Kc2? It's a complete mystery to me. Also, I still don't see what tablebases have to do with this. It's just a simple refutation.
Finally, the draw after 1...Ke3 2.b7 Be6 3.Bc4 is very trivial! Here, I don't see any subtlety either. Am I missing something? Mr. Afek, can you explain what's going on here?

Peter Doggers's picture

Aha, interesting. It seems that this is the first endgame study ever published at ChessVibes that's busted by the tablebase! 1.b6+ Kd1! 2.b7 Kc2 is the idea - White is mated.

Well, since the (flawed) solution of the study is quite pretty, this week's task is: how to draw with White if Black answers 1.b6 with 1...Ke3.

Willem's picture

1.b6+ Kd1 2.b7 Be6 3.Bc4 is quite annoying.

Thomas's picture

Yesterday during the break of a blitz tournament I could "kibitz" when Jan Timman and Afek were discussing unpublished endgame studies (of the "less heavy-weighted":) ) - this and seeing living legend Korchnoi in action were more than adequate compensation for missing live coverage of the Tal Memorial .... .

Arne Moll's picture

You may be right. I don't see it any defence for White either after 1.b6+ Kd1 2.Kb3 Bc6 and White will surely not be able to hold this in the long run (although I haven't analysed it extensively). Seems Black can just play Rd7-g7 and Bc6-f3 there, and then come closer with the king. Perhaps we're missing something truly brilliant?

Titus's picture

white is dead lost after b6+ K d1! . Tablebases do not lie. Maybe an error in the position or it should be "white to play and lose"?

Willem's picture

I guess white should draw.

Richard's picture

>> Finally, the draw after 1…Ke3 2.b7 Be6 3.Bc4 is very trivial!

>It’s not too difficult, but I wouldn’t call it trivial after 3…Rd2+ (took me some time)

Me neither, you still have to find one very, very pretty move with white!!

Arne Moll's picture

@Richard, Jochem. I must say I stopped after 3.Bc4, after which I thought 'there are no variations'. What line are you referring to?

Richard's picture

1. b6+, Ke3? 2. b7, Be6 3. Bc4, Rd2+ 4. Ka1 (only move), Rd1+ 5. Kb2 and now black has another try: 5..., Bf5! Now what?

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